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Faculty and Staff Notables

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October 2017

  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal has been nominated for a B. Iden Payne Award in Scenic Design. His design for The Herd, a David Jarrott Production, is one of five designs being considered for the best scenic design of 2016–2017 season in the Greater Austin Area. The recipient of this top design award will be announced at the November 3rd, B. Iden Payne Award Ceremony being held at the Scottish Rite Theater, Austin, Texas. His designs for The Herd, The Price, and Clybourne Park received the Austin Critics Table Award for Excellence in Scenic Design in June 2017.

  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony presented a paper titled “Several Questions which Work for Almost Any Computer Science Exam” at the 26th Annual Rocky Mountain Conference of the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges in Orem, Utah, held Oct. 13–14, 2017. Her paper will be published in the December 2017 issue of the Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi was competitively selected to present a lecture titled “Financial Mentorship Strategies for Voice Teachers” at the fall meeting of the National Association of Teachers of Singing, South Texas Chapter. Informed by her work directing BELTA (Building Empowering Lives Through Art), a nonprofit that provides free crowdfunding services to artists and musicians, her presentation focused on crowdfunding best practices, fiscal sponsorship for artists and the basics of searching for grants to individuals.

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was the featured speaker at Project Minnesota/León’s (PML) annual fundraiser on Oct. 14. His remarks were on the topic of contemporary Nicaraguan politics. He also led a seminar on the same topic for some PML’s board members and donors.

  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton spoke at Baylor University as a visiting artist on Oct. 9. Daulton presented demonstrations in lithography and intaglio printing, shared his work, spoke about the conceptual ideas in his work and process, and discussed his career path as an artist and educator.  

  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer gave an invited talk and led a seminar at Purdue University on Oct. 5. Her talk, “Access Rebels: A Crip Manifesto for Social Justice,” was co-sponsored by Purdue’s Critical Disability Studies Program and the Purdue Honors College. Using the frame of “access rebels,” Kafer discussed the possibility of building radical cultures of accessibility and solidarity. She also led a seminar with undergraduate and graduate students on her research about the Ashley X case.

  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Terracotta Warriors after the First Emperor: Re-evaluating the Qin Legacy in the Han” at University of Colorado Boulder on Oct. 5. The lecture was delivered as the part of the 2017–2018 lecture program of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA), and co-sponsored by the Boulder chapter of the AIA and the Museum of Natural History at the University of Colorado Boulder.

  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks presented an invited talk at a Symposium within the XCLAMA (Latin American MalacologicalSociety) about the results from five years of investigating apple snails in Uruguay. The presentation, titled “Overlapping and Overlooked: Pomacea species distribution, diversity and hybridization in Uruguay,” included four alumni co-authors (Sofia Campos ’16, Carissa Bishop ’17, Paul Glasheen ’16, and Averi Segrest ’16), five Uruguayan collaborators (Clementina Calvo, Dr. Mariana Meerhoff, Cristhian Clavijo, Ana Elise Röhrdanz, and Fabricio Scarabino) along with United States partner Dr. Ken Hayes of Howard University. This work represents the first evidence presented for hybridization of the snails in the native range, which has broad evolutionary implications. In addition, the work included a description of the broad and complex distribution of a cryptic species, a species containing individuals that are morphologically identical to those in a different species.

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr recently had her proposal “Hidden No More: Stories of Triumph, Excellence, and Achievement in Math and Computer Science” selected for funding as a mini-grant through the “WATCH US” grant from the National Science Foundation INCLUDES program. This mini-grant will bring four women from underrepresented groups with doctorates in mathematics and computer science to campus over the 2017–2018 academic year for a lecture series where each speaker will tell her journey to math (or computer science) and also share the type of research she does.

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari led the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) into its 41st season with a concert at the Austin ISD Performing Arts Center on Sept. 24. As Music Director of the ACO, Ferrari opened the orchestra’s Made in America season by conducting a program of music by Bernstein, Copland, Ellington, and Stookey. The latter, with text by Lemony Snicket, is a narrated who-dun-it aimed at engaging younger audience members. The ACO also sponsored an instrument petting zoo prior to the concert and offered this performance as a “pay what you wish” event.

  • Professors of Biology Maria Cuevas and Maria Todd presented their research “Expression of claudin-3 and -4 tight junction proteins in endometrial cancer cell lines and tumor tissues derived from African American women” at the 10th American Association of Cancer Research Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved in Atlanta, Ga. Sept. 25–28. An abstract was published in the AACR Meeting Proceedings.

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth will give a presentation on Southwestern’s Football + Experience Abroad program at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ (AAC&U) held January 24–27, 2018, in Washington, DC. Berroth’s proposal was one of over 450 submitted to present at the conference. AAC&U accepted fewer than 20 percent of those submitted. The proposals selected represent the work of faculty members, administrators, and higher education leaders at colleges, community colleges, universities, and educational organizations across the country.

  • Assistant Professor of Business Hazel Nguyen published an article titled “Stock market liquidity: Financially constrained firms and share repurchase” in the journal Accounting and Finance Research, 2017, vol 6(4).

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura and Robert Lehr ’15 published a paper in Mathematics Magazine’s October 2017 issue titled “A New Perspective on Finding the Viewpoint” (90, no. 4, p. 267-77). The article uses projective geometry to give a new method for determining where a viewer should stand in front of a two-point perspective drawing to view it correctly.

  • Part-Time Instructor of Economics and Business Jim Christianson recently made a presentation to the Waco Scandinavian Club titled “History of the 10,000 Swedish Settlers of Travis and Williamson Counties 1870–1910.”

September 2017

  • Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner’s artwork from her “Crossed Paths” series was selected for the exhibition “Small Format 2017” in Dublin, Ireland. Organized by Black Church Print Studio, the exhibition is being held at Library Project, a “cultural hub at the heart of Temple Bar, multidisciplinary in approach. The space offers visitors an open door to discover local and international contemporary art practices through a collection of publications and a variety of exhibitions and events.” Earlier this year, she exhibited three large drawings in her “Centripetal Forces” series at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in “Drawing Perspectives,” an invitational exhibition of five artists curated by Professor Barbara Fontaine White, who described her curatorial intent in the catalogue as follows, “’Drawing Perspectives’ celebrates a variety of approaches to drawing and demonstrates the complexity of content and media utilized today.”  Varner also exhibited five of her engravings at the VAM Gallery in Austin in “Eight from Texas,” curated by Professor Tim High, University of Texas. Lily Press in Washington, D.C., a fine art press, is currently publishing two editions of large prints, created by Varner at the press this summer with Master Printer Susan Goldman, owner and operator.

  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower presented a paper titled “From ‘Tydder’ to ‘Tudor,’ ‘Stewart’ to ‘Stuart’: Dynasty, Empire, and Identity in the Early Modern Atlantic World” at the “Modern Invention of Dynasty: A Global Intellectual History, 1500–2000” Conference at the University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK, Sept. 21–23, 2017.

  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi chaired and participated in a panel at the Marketing Management Association Conference in Pittsburgh, Pa., held Sept. 20–22, 2017. The panel focused on methods to  develop innovative and original marketing course materials and design class discussions which garner thoughtful student engagement.

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth accepted a nomination to serve on the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) Program Committee for the 2018 AATG / American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Convention and World Languages Expo in New Orleans, La., Nov. 16–18, 2018. This prestigious nomination came from the president of the AATG who annually selects three AATG members. The committee identifies topics and chairs for a number of planned sessions of special interest to the membership. Committee members also review and select all session proposals with a focus on German. They are instrumental in shaping a future-oriented program representative of important aspects in teaching and learning German. This convention marks an important year of intentional inter-connectedness and will be especially exciting since AATG and ACTFL will be meeting in conjunction with the Fédération Internationale des Professeurs de Langues Vivantes/International Modern Language Teachers’ Federation (FIPLV). Furthermore, AATG has extended an invitation for Berroth to participate in the Internationaler Deutschlehrerinnen- und Deutschlehrerverband in a North America meeting.

  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer had a chapter published in the new collection Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities: Toward an Eco-Crip Theory, edited by Sarah Jaquette Ray and Jay Sibara (University of Nebraska, 2017). Her contribution, “Bodies of Nature: The Environmental Politics of Disability,” is reprinted from her book Feminist Queer Crip (Indiana University, 2013) and is included in the “Foundations” section of the anthology.

  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones published an article titled “Homeopathy ‘for Mexicans’: Medical Popularisation, Commercial Endeavours, and Patients’ Choice in the Mexican Medical Marketplace, 1853–1872” in the journal Medical History, 61, 4.

  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’ composition “Pájaros” for solo flute and strings enjoyed its world première performance Sept. 17, 2017, with the composer as soloist with the Balcones Community Orchestra under the direction of Dr. Robert Radmer. Based on bird songs of central Texas, the piece was warmly received with a standing ovation. Inglis also performed the first movement of “Concerto No. 4” by François Devienne. Inversion Ensemble will perform “Pájaros” Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017, at 7 p.m. at Westminster Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall in Austin, and Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, at 3 p.m. at First United Methodist Church of Pflugerville.

  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa’s article “Chopsticks, Golliwogs and Wigwams: The Need for Cultural Awareness in Piano Teaching Materials and Repertoire” appeared in the October/November 2017 issue of American Music Teacher, the journal of the Music Teachers National Association. The article explores how piano teaching materials and repertoire still in use today can convey attitudes toward ethnic and cultural groups that do not reflect the progress being made in daily life.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel will have an installation in ”Fountain: sculptural musings on the readymade” at St. Edward’s University in Austin. The artists in the exhibit investigate reconfigured, found, mass-produced, or functional objects to elicit sculptures that are familiar yet absurd, compelling yet irreverent, perplexing yet seductive. Opening Reception will be Friday, Sept. 22, from 6–8 p.m. at St. Edward’s  Fine Arts Gallery. The installation will be on view through Oct. 12, 2017.

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth was elected to the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) Texas leadership team. On a three-year term, she will serve as Vice President, President, and Outgoing President to assure continuity and mentoring. At the Sept. 9, 2017, joint meeting of all three Texas AATG chapters, Berroth delivered a presentation on her research and teaching praxis in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) with sample lessons from her project of connecting German and Math to an audience of German teachers working at Texas high schools, colleges, and universities.

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin gave a talk on the “Pink Tide” and Latin America’s Political Pendulum at the Bulverde/Spring Branch Public Library as part of the Foreign Policy Association’s Great Decisions discussion program.

  • President Edward Burger was invited to lead the plenary session, “The State of Higher Education in Texas,” at the Annual Meeting of the Independent Colleges and Universities of Texas held in Austin on Sept. 11, 2017, in which he discussed educational issues with Lee Jackson, Chancellor of The University of North Texas System, and Bill Powers, President Emeritus of The University of Texas at Austin.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus co-authored  an article titled “Translanguaging Pedagogies for Positive Identities in Two-Way Dual Language Bilingual Education” in the Journal of Language, Identity & Education. This is a timely article considering the rise of two-way dual language programs in the local area(s).

  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes writes for the blog Lawyers, Guns & Money. The blog was recently named one of the top 100 political science blogs on the web. Read her recent pieces here.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel was invited to participate in “In-Cahoots: Mischievously Playful Craft” at Signature Gallery in Atlanta, Ga. The exhibition features artists who push the boundary of craft, technique, and concept. The gallery is on view Sept. 16–Oct. 7.

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin participated in a panel titled “What Have We Learned About Revolutions?” at the 2017 meeting of the American Political Science Association. His remarks were under the rubric “Revolution in the Age of Authoritarian Revanchism.”

  • Deidra McCall, Class of 2017, participated in the Honors Program and presented a research paper titled “Racialized Politics and the Confederate Flag: Why Society Can Never Be Color-Blind” at the August 2017 American Sociological Association (ASA) annual meeting in Montreal, Canada. Her participation was funded through her award as Southwestern’s first Mellon Undergraduate Fellow. At this same conference, Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe and Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron presented a paper titled “Neutralizing Harm: Sexist and Racist Jokes among Undergraduate Students.” Holly O’Hara, Class of 2017, and Dakota Cortez, Class of 2019, are co-authors on the paper. This paper is part of a larger project supported by SU’s Faculty-Student Collaborative research funds. Byron also served his final year on the ASA Honors Program Advisory Council.

  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller presented a paper at The Second Conference of the European Association for Asian Art and Archaeology, held at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, from Aug. 24–27. The paper, titled “The Status of the Mural in Early Han Art: Reflections from the Shiyuan Tomb,” was presented on a panel that she organized and chaired titled “Mural Painting in Han China: Re-Examining the Origins and Development of the Genre.”

  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton exhibited new mixed media works and a limited edition book at the Nicole Longnecker Gallery in Houston, TX. The work was part of a three-person exhibition on view from July 8–Sept. 4, 2017.

  • Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes and Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth’s proposal submitted for programming in MLL German has been selected to receive a Deutsch macht Spaß Grant in the amount of $500. The American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) is offering these grants through funds provided by the German government’s Netzwerk Deutsch program. The grant will support a community outreach program in October.

August 2017

  • Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote published the article “Alternative DNA structure formation in the mutagenic human c-MYC promoter” in the highly ranked journal Nucleic Acids Research. This research is significant because it implicates the involvement of a three-stranded DNA structure in genome instability associated with the human c-MYC oncogene region and cancer. Chemistry alumni Sarah Coe ’17 and Olivia Drummond ’17 were involved in this research project.

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “The Disappearing Jew” in Inside Higher Education.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel had work selected for the fourth annual Juried National exhibition at Red Lodge Clay Center in Red Lodge, Mont. The exhibition highlights the diverse scope of ideas and techniques artists are exploring in contemporary ceramics.  The exhibition will be on view to the public September 1–22, 2017.

  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar was quoted in a recent article in VICE Motherboard exploring the cultural influence of the iPhone on the tenth anniversary of its release. The June 27, 2017 article, by Caroline Haskins, is titled “The iPhone Has Objectified Our Faces.”

  • Professor of Theatre Kathleen Juhl and Cathy Madden’s co-edited book, Galvanizing Performance: The Alexander Technique as a Catalyst for Excellence, was published on August 21, 2017. The Alexander Technique is practiced widely by performing artists. It encourages artists to make the choice to perform with ease and confidence. This book is the first of its kind because it focuses specifically on the ways performing artists and their teachers engage the Alexander Technique as they rehearse and perform. The book represents the first time Alexander Technique teachers have formally opened the doors to their teaching studios and classrooms to reveal specific pedagogies for working with the technique and performance.

  • Senior Director of Advancement Services and Operations Leigh Petersen chaired the APRA (Association of Professional Researchers for Advancement) Data Analytics Symposium in Anaheim, Calif. in August. Close to 150 universities and nonprofits joined together for two days for intensive data analytic presentations and internationally known speakers.

  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi co-authored the article “Effects of Offline Ad Content on Online Brand Search: Insights from Super Bowl Advertising,” which is forthcoming in the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science.

  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones co-organized the symposium “(Un)Bounded Doctors: Nation, Profession, and Place in the Local and Global Formation of Medical Groups in the 19th and 20th Centuries” together with Dr. Beatriz Teixeira Weber from Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil, for the International Congress of the History of Science and Technology in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, July 23–29, 2017. The symposium brought together scholars from McGill University (Canada), University of Western Ontario (Canada), Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (Brazil), Casa de Oswaldo Cruz/Fiocruz (Brazil), Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico), Brown University (USA), and Southwestern University (USA) to discuss the demography of doctors as a result of state-building processes, migration, professional organization, and the provision of health. In this panel, Hernandez Berrones presented the paper “From Foreign Healers to International Doctors: Internationalism and the Consolidation of Homeopathy in Mexico, 1853–1942.” The ideas for this paper resulted from conversations with Latin American & Border Studies committee members about the inclusion of Borderland Studies in the Latin American Studies Program and with students and faculty during the First Borderlands Symposium in the fall of 2016.

  • Head Football Coach Joe Austin’s solicited article “Rev-Up Your ‘Jet’ Motion Offense with Explosive Play-Action Passes” was published by American Football Monthly on Aug. 15, 2017.

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth is a member of the Collaborative Work Group/Board of Authors on an innovative German project. With leadership from Macalester College German Studies professor Britt Abel, a Digital Humanities Advancement Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) will help the group create digital open-educational resources for teaching and learning German language and culture. Dr. Faye Stewart, a former Brown Junior Visiting Assistant Professor of German at Southwestern, is also a member of the team.

  • President Edward Burger was recently elected to serve on the Governing Board of the Aspen Institute Wye Seminars in collaboration with the Association of American Colleges and Universities.

  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks attended the Ecological Society of America meetings in Portland, Ore., with three of her research students, Carissa Bishop ’17, Madison Granier, class of 2019, and Sophia Campos ’16, Aug. 6–11. All three presented their own research posters at this national meeting attended by over 4,000 ecologists. Bishop shared her experience mentoring her peers in an Invertebrate Ecology lab taught by Burks. Her poster “Turning an RA into a TA: Case study in utilizing undergraduate research expertise to improve a molecular ecology course undergraduate research experience” evaluated a module made possible by funds from the Keck Foundation. Granier presented her poster titled “Snail Slime in Real Time: qPCR Detection of Environmental DNA from Apple Snails”  which includes a collaboration with SU alumni Dr. Matthew Barnes ’06. This project extends her SCOPE research from the summer of 2016. Campos added the final samples to her analysis and presented a poster titled “Cryptic Yet Curiously Common: Population genetic structure and diversity of a cryptic Pomacea sp. and its better known congeneric P. canaliculata.”  Co-authors include Dr. Ken Hayes from Howard University and Cristhian M. Blavijo and Fabrizio Scarabino from Uruguay.

  • Professor of Art and Art History and chair of Art History Thomas Noble Howe published Excavation and Study of the Garden of the Great Peristyle of the Villa Arianna, Stabiae, 2007-2010 (Quaderni  di Studi Pompeiani, VII, [Associazione Internazionale di Amici di Pompei/Editrice Longobardi, Castellammare di Pompei/Fondazione Restoring Ancient Stabiae, 2016 (2017)]. Howe is lead author/editor and excavation director of the project, 2007–13 and along with Kathryn Gleason (Cornell), Michele Palmer, and Ian Sutherland (Middlebury). The publication is supported by subventions from the von Bothmer Fund of the Archaeological Institute of America, Associazione Internationale Amici di Pompei, School of Architecture Preservation and Planning, University of Maryland, Joyce and Erik Young. The major significance of this excavation of this enormous excellently preserved garden (c. 108 x 35 m.) is that it is the first actual archaeological evidence of the existence of the type of garden seen in the famous garden fresco of the Villa of the empress Livia at Prima Porta, formerly thought to be a “fantasy” painting. Howe and Gleason have since developed and published further theses on how this discovery clarifies exactly how elite inhabitants and guests used this garden and ambient architecture to move through spaces and interact in an intensely political environment. At one point Howe lead field seasons of as many as 110 people from twelve institutions and seven countries.

  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Chad Stolper co-authored the article “Vispubdata.org: A Metadata Collection About IEEE Visualization (VIS) Publications” which has been published in the September 2017 issue of IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics (IEEE TVCG).

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor published an article titled “Easing Political Digestion: The effects of news curation on citizens’ behavior” in the Journal of Information Technology and Politics. The article is coauthored with Danielle Psimas, a 2015 graduate of the University of Virginia’s Politics Honors Program.

  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony and Kathryn Reagan ’16 coauthored an article on “Community-Engaged Projects in Operations Research” in the Summer 2017 issue of Science Education and Civic Engagement: An International Journal. The research for this article was conducted during the Spring 2015 Operations Research course, with support from Director of Community-Engaged Learning Sarah Brackmann. Reagan was a Community-Engaged Learning Teaching Assistant and Anthony was a participant in the CEL Faculty Fellows program.

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura presented a talk, “Fractals in Japanese Woodblock Prints,” as part of the Academic and Cultural Lecture Series of the Japan-America Society of Greater Austin in July 2017. This public lecture was presented at St. Edward’s University.

  • Four of our mathematics faculty, two students, and an alumnus were active at MathFest, a national meeting of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) held July 26–29, 2017 in Chicago, Ill.

    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura co-presented the minicourse “Visualizing Projective Geometry Through Photographs and Perspective Drawings” with Annalisa Crannell of Franklin & Marshall College and Marc Frantz of Indiana University.

    • Visiting Assistant Professor John Ross presented “Lessons Learned Creating IBL Course Notes” at the MathFest Contributed Paper Session “Inquiry-Based Teaching and Learning.”

    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton co-organized and presented the workshop “Examples and Experiences in Teaching a Modeling-Based Differential Equations Course” with Rosemary Farley of Manhattan College, Patrice Tiffany of Manhattan College, and Brian Winkel of SIMIODE.

    • Beulah Agyemang-Barimah ’17 and Shelton co-presented “Pharmacokinetic Models for Active Learning” with Theresa Laurent of St. Louis College of Pharmacy.  This was part of the Contributed Paper Session “A Modeling First Approach in a Tradition Differential Equations Class.” Shelton’s work was supported by the Keck Foundation Grant at Southwestern.

    • Daniela Beckelhymer and D’Andre Adams, both class of 2020, presented “Choose Your Own Adventure: An Analysis of Interactive Gamebooks Using Graph Theory” in the MAA Student Paper Session based on work from the 2017 SCOPE work supervised by Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr.  Their travel was supported by the SCOPE and S-STEM programs at Southwestern.

    • Ross and Marr served as judges for some of the MAA Student Paper Sessions.

  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa was a featured artist and one of three guest presenters at the Oregon Music Teachers’ Association annual conference in Lincoln City, Ore, July 14–16, 2017. He presented two sessions, “Basics of Contrapuntal Playing on the Keyboard” and “Echoes from the East: Debussy and the Javanese Gamelan,” taught a master class on the keyboard music of J.S. Bach, and performed a solo recital of music by Bach, Debussy and Schumann.

  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was an invited participant at the Google Cloud Platform Faculty Institute held at Google’s Mountain View, Calif., campus in July–Aug. 2017. The institute brought together approximately 60 faculty and numerous Googlers to consider how cloud technologies can be more effectively incorporated into the classroom.

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth was invited to present the concluding paper in a three-session section on integrating STEM and German at the XVI. International Conference of Teachers of German, IDT, in Fribourg, Switzerland from July 31–Aug. 4, 2017. IDT meets every fourth year and is the world’s largest international convention for teachers of German. Berroth shared her research in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) resulting from her ACS funded interdisciplinary project on connecting Math and German, on which she collaborated with Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum. Berroth’s participation was funded by a scholarship from the Goethe Institute in Washington, DC.

  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger presented a paper at a seminar on the topic of strangers and immigration in Shakespeare and the modern world at the conference of ESRA (European Shakespeare Research Association) in Gdansk, Poland. In addition, at the same conference, he led a workshop titled “Shakespeare Between Languages.” In this workshop, a variety of European Shakespeare scholars translated a section of English poetry into French, Polish, Italian, Spanish and Chinese. Saenger led a discussion of the practical and theoretical challenges and opportunities of these varied encounters with language difference.

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr co-organized the mini-conference “Constructing the Future of Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) Conference: The Past 20 Years and the Next 20 Years” on July 27, 2017 in Chicago, Ill.  Visiting Assistant Professor John Ross presented the poster “Using IBL in Classes with Fewer or Shorter Meetings” at the IBL conference.  Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton also participated in the IBL conference.

  • Professor of Religion Laura Hobgood published a chapter titled “Animals” in The Routledge Companion to Death and Dying, ed. Christopher Moreman. Routledge, 2017.

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “The Misogyny of MENASHE” in Lilith Magazine Blog.

  • Professor of Mathematics Kendall Richards coauthored (with Horst Alzer) the article “Inequalities for the Ratio of Complete Elliptic Integrals,” which was recently published in the Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society.

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr was among 10 faculty from across the country selected to attend the Workshop on Increasing Minority Participation in Undergraduate Mathematics at the Park City Math Institute in June 2017.  The workshop was led by Dr. Bill Velez from University of Arizona and Dr. Erica Walker from Teachers College, Columbia University.

  • Assistant Professor of Economics Patrick Van Horn presented his research titled “The Federal Reserve as a Start-Up: New Evidence from the Daily Discount Ledger from 1914–1917” at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas on July 11, 2017. His paper was coauthored by Christoffer Koch.

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth was invited to observe and participate in sessions of the intensive summer language programs in Arabic at Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane, Morocco in July 2017. The guest visit, pedagogy observation, and intensive study was made possible by a Sam Taylor Fellowship awarded by the United Methodist Church.

July 2017

  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo was invited to present as a part of a panel at the 2017 American Library Association Annual Meeting in Chicago, Ill. This panel, titled “Giving Voice to Diverse Collections Through Digitization,” included other professionals from Amherst College, Washington University, the University of Minnesota, and Washington State University. The panel focused on ways that digitization of material in archives and special collections can help to give voice to underrepresented groups in the historical narrative. Sendejo presented on the Latina History Project, a collaborative project between Sendejo, Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer, and Southwestern’s Special Collections. Over 100 librarians and archivists were in attendance. The panel was organized and planned by Director of Special Collections & Archives Jason W. Dean.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower presented a paper titled “’Every Candidate…Is Running Against Our Union’: AFSCME’s Response to Tax Cut Fever in the Late 1970s” at the annual meeting of the Labor and Working Class History Association at the University of Washington in Seattle.

  • Part-time Assistant Professor of Applied Music Li Kuang was invited to hold a four-day guest artist residency at both Yantai University’s College of Fine Arts and Jilin College of Fine Arts in China May 30–June 10, 2017. During the time of these residencies, Kuang taught masterclasses, gave private lessons, conducted clinics and presented solo recitals at both schools. In addition, Kuang was invited to teach a masterclass at Sichuan Conservatory of Music in Chengdu, China, on May 23. His residencies received great success and his trip to China helped create connections between Chinese music schools and Southwestern University. Kuang has already received several additional invitations from major conservatories for guest artist residencies and has set engagements with some of them for the summer of 2018.

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Flying While Female on El Al” on Lilith’s Magazine blog.


    Meyers also published “‘Are You or Have You Ever Been a Zionist?’  A Letter to Chicago Dyke March” in The Forward.  

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel had work selected for an exhibition titled “Small Works” at Trestle Gallery in Brooklyn, New York. The exhibition was juried by Bill Carroll, Director of the Studio Program of the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts in New York City. Small Works features over 60 local, national, and international artists in all different areas of contemporary art who focus on the significance of intimately scaled works of art.  The exhibition will be on view to the public July 6–27, 2017.

  • Professor of Art Mary Visser presented a paper titled “Think, Connect and Create” at the 2017 annual meetings of the AEFA/Service of Art and Education in Paris, France. This paper presents how liberal arts universities use 3D printing as an educational tool that helps students make connections across disciplines.

  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller published a review of the book Color in Ancient and Medieval East Asia (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015) in volume 137, issue 1 of the Journal of the American Oriental Society.

  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron presented a paper titled “Employment Discrimination Activism and Intergenerational Change” at the CERES Conference at the University of Edinburgh on June 16, 2017. This paper compares race-based employment discrimination claims across the U.S. and U.K.

June 2017

  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger published a review of The City Theater’s production of Taming of the Shrew in Austin.

  • Professor of English David Gaines was interviewed by BuzzFeed and quoted in the article “People Think Bob Dylan Plagiarized His Nobel Lecture From SparkNotes” on June 15. Gaines joined the conversation regarding Bob Dylan’s alleged use of Spark Notes in his discussion of Moby-Dick.

  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper published a chapter titled “Faust’s Schubert: Schubert’s _Faust_” in Goethe’s “Faust” in Music: Music in Goethe’s “Faust,” ed. Lorraine Byrne Bodley (New York: Boydell, 2017). The first study to discuss the complete corpus of Schubert’s settings from Faust as a group in their dramatic and historical context, the chapter argues that Schubert, treating Part I of Goethe’s tragedy just four years after its publication in Vienna, was the first composer not only to appreciate the significance of Goethe’s recasting the traditional Faust narrative as a wager rather than a pact (and hence a venture in which humanity could outsmart or otherwise overcome the cosmic forces of Good and Evil that operate in the foreground of the drama), but also to understand that the true driving force of the drama is not Faust himself, but Gretchen. In so doing Schubert musically iterated “the woman question” that was gaining increasing prominence in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century European cultural spheres, grappled astutely with a theme of Goethe’s drama even as much of the literary world was viewing it with incomprehension or outright hostility, and pioneered interpretive trends that have since assumed almost dogmatic status.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel had two sculptures selected for an exhibition titled “Sweet ‘n Low: An International show of Cute” at Bedford Gallery in Walnut Creek, Calif.  The exhibition was juried by Evan Pricco, editor of Juxtapoz Magazine, and Susannah Kelly and Neil Perry of Antler Gallery in Portland, Ore. Sweet ‘n Low features artwork from over 130 local, national, and international artists who extend the genre of cute from cuddly and precious to creepy and ironic. The exhibition will be on view June 22–Aug. 27, 2017.

  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis’ composition “Letters to Faith” made its world premiere June 3 at Austin’s new choral collective Inversion Ensemble. The eight-voice a cappella choral work sets to music two letters written by Inglis’ grandparents to their daughter, Faith Inglis, while she was a student at Pomona College. Faith’s parents wrote these letters to comfort and encourage her after a poor showing on an exam, but unwittingly revealed amusing and poignant family characteristics.

  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo presented “The Face of God Has Changed: Mujerista Ethnography and the Politics of Spirituality in the Borderlands” at the Inter University Program for Latino Research (IUPLR) conference in San Antonio on May 18. She was invited to present on a panel titled “Cultural Anthropology in the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands: A Texas Perspective.” Sendejo spoke on her current book project and a forthcoming publication on the emergence of Chicana feminist thought in Texas, which she connected to Southwestern’s Latina History Project.

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Serious Missteps in Dirty Dancing Remake” in Lilith Magazine’s blog.

  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal’s scenic design for the play, The Herd, has been added to the short list of plays under consideration for B. Iden Payne award nominations for 2016–2017. Roybal also received the Austin Critics Table Award for Excellence in Scenic Design for the 2016–2017 theatre season for his designs for  Clybourne Park, The Price, and The Herd. All three plays were credited for design excellence. The Herd and The Price were designed for David Jarrott Productions. Clybourne Park was designed for Penfold Theatre. These plays were selected for the award from all the plays produced in Austin and the Greater Austin Area for 2016–2017. The adjudicators were critics writing for both print and online publications including the Austin-American Statesman, Austin Chronicle, CTX Live, BroadwayWorld Austin, Austin Entertainment Weekly, ConflictofInterest.com, and Arts and Culture Texas. Clybourne Park also received the Austin Critics Table Award for Excellence in Collaborative Ensemble Production. Roybal was scenic designer, Justin Smith ’04 was technical director, and Austin Mueck ’18 was assistant scenic designer.

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari performed (conducted) three concert programs with the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) over the past four months. The March 25 concert, “Texas Rising Stars,” featured concerto winners from the Butler School of Music at the University of Texas-Austin in addition to William Grant Still’s Afro-American Symphony. On May 13, the ACO hosted the Texas Guitar Quartet in a performance of Rodrigo’s Concierto Andaluz for Four Guitars. Also on the program was Tchaikovsky’s 4th Symphony. June 9–10 marked the 40th annual Zilker Park pops concerts. This year featured music by the Beatles and an eclectic array of music chosen by ACO audiences throughout the 2016–17 season.

May 2017

  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones organized the panel “Medical Pluralism in Latin America Revisited: Chinese Medicine, Homeopathy, and Psychoanalysis in the Latin American Landscape in the 19th and 20th Centuries” for the annual meeting of the American Association for the History of Medicine in Nashville, Tenn. (May 4–7, 2017). In this panel, he also presented the paper titled “’Hostilidad,’ ‘Desorden’ and ‘Indisciplina’: The Challenges of Medical Pluralism at the National Homeopathic Hospital during the Age of Institutionalization of Biomedicine in Mexico City, 1893–1934.”

  • Southwestern Head Men and Women’s Tennis Coach Billy Porter was named Wilson/Intercollegiate Tennis Association’s Men’s Tennis West Region Coach of the Year.

  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti was invited to contribute the essay on “Adorno and Democracy” for the Blackwell Companion to Adorno, a volume that will be edited by Espen Hammer, Peter Gordon, and Max Pensky. Her essay, “The Dispossession of the Public and the ‘Common Benefits’ Clause: Working Against Neoliberal Oligarchy through U.S. State Constitutions,” was also just published in American Political Thought: An Alternative View, edited by Alex Zamalin and Jonathan Keller (Routledge, 2017).

  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer gave an invited talk at Portland State University (PSU) on May 11. She spoke about coalition-building and imagining social justice futures. While at PSU, she met with students, staff, and faculty from the Disability Resource Center, the Queer Resource Center, and the Women’s/Gender/Sexuality Studies Department, among others.

  • Professor of Education Michael Kamen and Mary Rouhiainen, Class of 2018, co-presented findings from their summer Faculty-Student Research project titled “Role of Imaginary Play in the Zone of Proximal Development and Science Learning” at the annual conference of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching.

  • Assistant Professor of Economics Patrick Van Horn presented his archival efforts at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas and the results of those efforts at the Innovative Solutions for Archives and Financial Crises Conference at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. The event was co-hosted by the European Association for Banking and Financial History. Van Horn was the closing speaker at the Archival Showcase, which bridged the efforts by archivists and economists to use historical materials to investigate economic issues.

  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Noble Howe will deliver the opening plenary lecture: “Bold Imitator: The Arrival of the Greek Monumental ‘Orders,’ the Autodidact Polymath Architect and the Apollonion of Syracuse” at the conference Fonte Aretusa  Πηγὴ Ἀρέθουσα, Third Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece, with special emphasis on: Μίμησις – Μimēsis: imitation, emulation, representation, reenactment, at the Sicily Center for International Education in Syracuse, Sicily, May 25–28, 2017. The invitation is the third in the last year which relates to recent interest in his dissertation “The Invention of the Doric Order” (Harvard 1985) on what is arguably the most controversial topic in architectural history, the creation of the Greek architectural “orders” (column types). The lecture proposes that the methodology which is generally used in architectural design classes, such as his own architecture studios, should be applied to questions of architectural history. Howe also will be chairing a session. The lecture will be in English, the chaired session in Italian. The lecture reprises a topic presented recently: that the profession of architect did not rise from the profession of builders.

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers has been invited to join the editorial board of Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor presented a paper titled “The Emotional Consequences of Political Incivility and Psychological Conflict Orientation” at the European Consortium for Political Research Joint Session Workshops in Nottingham, United Kingdom. The workshop, titled “Political Incivility in Parliament, Party Competition and Political Communication,” brought together scholars from 10 countries for four days of in-depth discussion on the topic.

  • Manager of Facilities & Maintenance Operations Shorty Schwartz was elected to the Texas Association of Physical Plant Administrators (TAPPA) for a one-year term. TAPPA is an organization of higher education facilities management professionals that promotes professionalism, networking, and education amongst the higher education facilities community.

  • Associate Director of Grants Niki Bertrand was awarded Honorable Mention for her recent poster presentation at the American Association of Physical Anthropologists meeting in New Orleans in April 2017. Bertrand’s doctoral thesis explores how anthropogenic factors influence stress-related behavior and physiology in a critically endangered species of monkey in Indonesia. The poster focused on one aspect of her research, the innovative collection of salivary cortisol using a non-invasive method from untrained, wild macaques. Bertrand was also awarded the 2017 Opler Scholarship for Dissertation Writing from the University at Buffalo Anthropology Department to support the completion of her thesis.

  • Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote gave an invited seminar at the University of North Texas. Her talk included work from her sabbatical on the consequences of damage to non-B DNA structures including its role in causing human genetic diseases such as cancer.

  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron gave an invited lecture titled “Implicit Bias, Microaggressions, and the March Toward More Inclusive Pedagogies” at SUNY Geneseo on April 27, 2017. He spent April 28 meeting with Geneseo students and their Special Diversity Commission to talk about campus climate issues and retention efforts.   

  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 was the featured guest performer for Austin Bridal Magazine’s 30th Anniversary Gala on Apr. 13 in Austin, Texas.

  • Southwestern was well represented at the Association of College Admission Counselor Super Conference in San Antonio, Texas Apr. 23—25. Dean of Enrollment Services Christine Bowman presented “The ABC’s of Paying for College,” as well as “A Grapefruit or a Plum? What Students Should Consider when their College list is a Fruit Basket which includes Small Liberal Arts Colleges and Medium and Large Public and Private Institutions. Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr presented “STEM and the Liberal Arts! Yes, Really” and Admission Counselor Patrick Firme presented “No, Nope, Na-Ah, No Way: Counseling Denied Students.”  This conference saw high school and college admission professionals from the Southern Texas and Rocky Mountain Regions of the United States.

  • Retired Associate Professor Rebecca Sheller and Professors of Biology Maria Cuevas and Maria Todd published an article in Biological Proceedings Online titled “Comparison of transepithelial resistance measurement techniques: Chopsticks vs. Endohm.” Measurement of transepithelial resistance (TER) is frequently used to determine the strength of tight junctions between epithelial cells in culture. However, the use of different technical approaches to measure TER sometimes results in inconsistent reports for TER readings within the same cell lines. To address this discrepancy, they compared two frequently used approaches (Chopsticks and Endhohm) and two types of polymer inserts (polycarbonate vs. polyester) to measure the TER values of three mammalian cell lines. Their study demonstrated the importance of using a single approach when seeking to measure and compare the TER values of cultured cell lines.

  • Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes and Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth accepted an invitation to screen and discuss the documentary Out of the Shadows: German Stories of Love, War and Faith on Apr. 25, 2017. Their presentation contributed to the Spring 2017 film series “Nachkriegsidentitäten - Post War Identities” hosted by the Department of Germanic Studies at The University of Texas, Austin.

  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes presented a paper “From ‘Ghetto’ to ‘Apartheid’: Education Policy as Housing Discrimination in 1970s Lyon” at the Society for French Historical Studies Annual Conference in Washington, D.C. She also participated in a special roundtable on “Human Rights in the Modern Francophone World.”

  • Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner had two prints selected for the 11th Biennial International Miniature Print Exhibition 2017 at the Center for Contemporary Printmaking in Norwalk, Connecticut, by Fredya Spira, Associate Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The juror reviewed 632 prints from 294 artists from 24 countries and 32 U.S. states. Varner’s prints, “Crossed Paths: Short Version” and “Path Over Tienanmen” will be on view from June 4—Aug. 27 at the Center.

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari has been awarded second place for the 2016 American Prize Competition in orchestral conducting (community orchestra). The American Prize competitions are national awards adjudicated through submission of recorded performances. Ferrari submitted video recordings of her performances of Beethoven’s 2nd Symphony, the Shostakovich 5th Symphony, and the Marquez Danzon No. 2, all performed with the Austin Civic Orchestra.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi was invited to present a lecture titled “Practical Uses for Technology in the Solo Voice Studio” at Northwest Vista College in San Antonio, Texas on Apr. 19.

  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal designed stage scenery and was Scenic Artist for David Jarrott Productions’ staging of The Herd, by Rory Kennear, now playing at Trinity Street Theatre. His interior, suburban London setting showcased paintings by two local artists, Shanny Lott of Austin and Associate Director of University Events Xan Koonce. This is Roybal’s second design for David Jarrott Productions. His first design, The Price by Arthur Miller, was awarded the 2016 Best Scene Design Award in Austin and the Greater Austin area by the Central Texas Excellence in Theatre Awards.

  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 judged the Spring 2017 Choir Competition for The Texas Charter School Academic and Athletic League (TCSAAL). TCSAAL works to aid the individual growth of Texas’ charter school students through academic and athletic competition, promotion of teamwork and a healthy lifestyle, and the constant pursuit for academic excellence.

  • Professor of English David Gaines offered two classroom workshops and delivered an invited address to the Texas Writers’ Conference at Schreiner University in Kerrville, Texas, on Apr. 25. The title of his address was “Dylan, Revelations, and Change: The Nobel Prize and ‘Literature.’”

  • Professor of Music and Austin Civic Orchestra Music Director Lois Ferrari led the Austin Civic Orchestra to second place in the 2016 American Prize Competition in community orchestra performance. The American Prize competitions are national awards adjudicated through submission of recorded performances. Ferrari and the ACO submitted live performances of Berlioz’s Symphonie Fantastique, Milhaud’s Creation du Monde, and the Marquez Danzon.

  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti participated in a panel titled “Mindfulness, Meditation, and Politics: Practices of the Social, Practices of the Self” on Apr. 13, 2017 at the Western Political Science Association conference in Vancouver, Canada. Her paper was titled “Zen Democracy: Experience and the Political Value of Modern Western Buddhism” and draws from a new book project.

  • Professor of Art and Art History, Chair of Art History, and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Thomas Howe will give an invited lecture, “Strolling with Power: New Light on Movement and Viewing in the Elite Villas of Stabiae,” at the conference “Gasparow Readings: Literature and Politics in Classical Antiquity” on Apr. 21. The conference is jointly organized by Russian State University for the Humanities (RSUH) and by Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA). It will be held at the RANEPA premises in the south-west of Moscow. Howe was invited to chair one of the sessions. The lecture will be in English with Russian translation.

  • Southwestern biochemistry alumna Katie Ferrick ’16 is the recipient of the prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. Ferrick conducted research with Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Maha Zewail-Foote during her four years at Southwestern. She is currently in graduate school at Stanford University. This year, there were 13,000 applications and NSF made 2,000 award offers

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Cinematic Sustenance for a Jewish Feminist Exodus” in Lilith Magazine Blog.

  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited presentation titled “Emperor Jing’s Yangling: A New Model for the Han Imperium” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York on Apr. 9. The lecture was part of a three-day symposium offered in conjunction with the major international loan exhibition, Age of Empires: Chinese Art of the Qin and Han Dynasties (221 B.C.–A.D. 220). The landmark exhibition features works borrowed from 32 museums and archaeological institutes in China that have never been previously shown in the West. Scholars from North America, Europe, and Asia discussed the significance of these recent archaeological finds from a global perspective in the symposium, which was organized by the Met, the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University, and the NYU Center for Ancient Studies.

April 2017

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor participated in the second research convening of the National Institute for Civil Discourse in Tucson, Ariz., on March 23–25.  She presented work she began with Southwestern alumna Grace Atkins ’16 titled “Signaling Incivility: The Role of Speaker, Substance and Tone.” She also presented her work on “The Emotional Consequences of Political Incivility and Psychological Conflict Orientation” at the Midwest Political Science Association’s annual meeting in Chicago, Ill., April 6–9.

  • Professor of Economics Emily Northrop’s article “A Stable Climate or Economic Growth?” was accepted for publication in the Review of Social Economy.  This research compares the rate of improvement in global CO2/GDP needed to meet the Paris Agreement commitments to the rate of progress we’ve achieved over the last 30 years.

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura and Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross took eight students to the Texas Section Meeting of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) at Texas A&M University-Commerce March 30–April 1, 2017.

    • Amy Jenkins, Class of 2017, presented “Instruments in Ones and Zeros: How Computers Mimic Timbre.” Jenkins’ work was based on her capstone supervised by Futamura.

    • Other students in attendance were Victoria Gore, Class of 2017, Morgan Engle,  Bonnie Henderson and Elyssa Sliheet, all Class of 2018, Sarah Cantu, Class of 2019, and Daniela Beckelhymer, D’Andre Adams, Victor Herrera, all Class of 2020. Gore, Henderson, Beckelhymer, Adams, and Herrera participated in the Calculus Bowl and made it to the final round.

    Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton attended the Executive Committee Meeting and Business Meeting as Immediate Past Chair of the Texas MAA, which included duties as Chair of the Nominating Committee, and the Department Liaisons Meeting. Funding for this trip was provided by the following at Southwestern: Fleming Student Travel Fund, the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, and the NSF S-STEM grant.

  • Professor of English David Gaines delivered “Listening To, Writing About and Teaching Dylan,” an invited lecture at Texas A&M University-Central Texas in Killeen on Apr. 10. He presented as part of the university library’s event devoted to the art of the 2016 Nobel Laureate in Literature.

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari performed (conducted) three concerts with the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) over the past six months. One on Oct. 29, another on Dec. 10, and the final on Feb. 4. The Feb. 4 concert, titled “Spotlight on Southwestern,” was presented in the Alma Thomas Theater and featured an all-Southwestern tribute. Professor of Music Kenny Sheppard lead the Southwestern Chorale in a collaborative performance of Mendelssohn’s Elijah, featuring Associate Professor of Music Bruce Cain and Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi as soloists. The ACO also performed Professor of Music Michael Cooper’s edition of Mendelssohn’s “Italian” Symphony, and Associate Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde’s composition, Lament. Also featured were nine Southwestern alumni, including Gus Sterneman ’06 who is the ACO’s assistant conductor.

  • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe, Professor of Sociology Sandi Nenga, and eight students presented papers at the annual meeting of the Southern Sociological Society in Greenville, S.C., March 30–April 1.

    • Deidra McCall, Class of 2018, presented “Racialized Politics and the Confederate Flag: Why Society Can Never Be Color-Blind.”

    • Melanie Theriault, Class of 2017, presented “Should we say something about her sister? Family roles and the siblings of people with disabilities.”

    • Samantha Pentecost, Class of 2019, presented “’We’re Not All the Same’: Levels of Conservatism and Assimilation as Predictors for Latino Partisan Choice.”

    • Cadie Pullig, Class of 2017, presented “Talking about Campaign Advertisements: How College Students Discuss the Appearance of Political Candidates.”

    • Kelly McKeon, Class of 2017, presented “Catching Up: Overcoming a Deficit in Cultural Capital as a First Generation College Student.”

    • Sarah Surgeoner, Class of 2017, presented “Femvertising: Commodification and Critical Consumption of Feminism in Advertising.”

    • Holly O’Hara, Class of 2017, and Dakota Cortez, Class of 2019, presented a paper titled “Sexual Assault, Zero Tolerance Policies, and the Gender Climate at a Liberal Arts University.” This paper was co-authored with Associate Professor of Sociology Reginald Byron and Lowe.

    • Holly O’Hara, Class of 2017, presented “Searching for a Genuine Sorority Woman: Greek Recruitment Practices at Public and Private Universities.”

    • Nenga presented “How Teenage Latinas Respond to and Resist Gender Surveillance in a College Readiness Program.”

    • Lowe also served on the program committee for the conference.

  • Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti presented a paper on April 1 at the Association for the Study of Law, Culture, and the Humanities conference at Stanford Law School. Her paper was titled “Common Benefits and Equal Privileges: The New Progressive Federalism, State Constitutional Rights, and a Democratic Politics against Neoliberal Oligarchy.”

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower published “Public Sector Unionism” in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of American History, eds. John Butler et. al.

  • President Edward Burger delivered the Luncheon Address at the Association of State Supervisors of Mathematics Annual Meeting on April 1 in San Antonio.  His lecture was titled “Leading with the ’20 Year Question.’” All 50 states were represented. On April 7, he returned to San Antonio for the annual meeting of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. There he led a workshop titled “Flipping classrooms into dynamic and impactful learning spaces with videos,” and then the Keynote Address of the conference, titled “Effective Thinking and Creative Puzzle-Solving.”

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth is the recipient of an internationally competitive DAAD scholarship to participate in a faculty development seminar in Erfurt, Germany, April 8–14, 2017. The German Academic Exchange Service (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst) seminar “Religions in Germany and the 500 Year Anniversary of the Reformation” brings together German teachers from all over the world to learn, discuss, and share resources. Berroth’s contribution, “Martin Luther in Film,” offers insights into research and teaching on filmic representations of the reformer produced in East and West Germany and in the USA. Berroth started this project in 2011, when she mentored Rory Jones ’12. Rory completed his German Honors Thesis on Luther, earned a Fulbright Fellowship, and for the year following his graduation from Southwestern taught English and continued his research exactly where he had hoped to be placed: Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Germany.

  • Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes and Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth offered a screening and panel discussion of their documentary, “Out of the Shadows: German Stories of Love, War, and Faith,” on March 30, 2017 at Southwestern University. Reyes, Berroth, and film director Whitney Milam discussed the film and its contexts with attentive audience members, many of whom shared their own memory narratives after the viewing. The documentary offers narratives and reflections of Germans who experienced the horrors of WWII as young children and later immigrated to the United States. Challenging easy dichotomies between victims and perpetrators, those stories reflect the resilience of people who found their ways out of the shadows of war and led faith-filled lives in their new homeland. The film project was made possible by a Sam Taylor Fellowship grant from the United Methodist Church. The inaugural screening at the Texas German Heritage Society in Austin generated interest among diverse audiences. Further screenings and panel discussions are planned for University of Texas at Austin and for Sun City in Georgetown. Reyes and Berroth express their gratitude for the excellent administrative and practical support of Administrative Assistant for the Faculty Susie Bullock.

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth participated in the 48th Annual Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) Conference in Baltimore, Md, March 23–26, 2017. The convention theme, “Translingual and Transcultural Competence: Toward a Multilingual Future in the Global Era,” furthered a much-needed discussion on the nature and value of the multicultural mosaic that the United States has become in the global era. Berroth presented her research paper titled “Pilgrimages of Recovery: Marica Bodrožić’s Work on Resilience, Landscapes and Humans” for the panel named Writing Spaces: Landscapes and/in German Travel Writing. Berroth also chaired and contributed to a panel sponsored by the Coalition of Women in German, Feminist Approaches to/in German Studies: Inclusivity and Sustainability. Her presentation, “Empathy: Experiments in Teaching for Diversity and Inclusiveness,” reflected on teaching methods and content for teaching on the Syrian refugee crisis and on transnational identity formations.

  • Three Southwestern students, mentored by Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth, presented their work at the Seventh Undergraduate Research Conference in German Studies on Saturday, April 1, 2017. This year the conference, co-organized by Lafayette College and Moravian College, took place at Moravian College in Bethlehem, Pa. This conference gives students the opportunity to present their research in all German-related fields, including but not limited to the study of German literature, film and culture, art history, music, philosophy, history and politics. Rosa Karen Castañeda Hernandez, Class of 2017, a double major in German and Communication Studies, presented her German Capstone project, “Illuminating Dark Tourism: Perspectives on Representations of Holocaust Tourism in Am Ende kommen Touristen (2007),” for a panel on the Holocaust. Miriam Richard, Class of 2018, an Education major who studied German at SU and abroad, presented her research paper titled “The Painful Consciousness of Being Transnational: Representations of Transnational Identities in German Texts and Films.” Aaron Woodall, Class of 2018, a Political Science major, presented his research on “Displacement and the Reconstruction of Transnational Identity.”

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton was invited to speak at the Undergraduate Mathematics Colloquium at the University of North Texas in Denton, TX on March 29, 2017. She will present “Markovian Recycling and other Math Models,” a continuation of work with Yvette Niyomugaba ’13. Shelton and Niyomugaba conducted research under a Summer Faculty Student Project and throughout Niyomugaba’s senior year. Shelton has expanded and updated the work as part of a sabbatical.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower won a Summer Stipend fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support the completion of his book, A Revolution in Government: Jerry Wurf and the Rise of Public Sector Unions in Postwar America (University of Pennsylvania Press).

  • 2015 graduate Paul Glasheen’s thesis appeared in an advance, online version in the highly respected, peer-reviewed journal Freshwater Science. The study, “Survival, recovery, and reproduction of apple snails (Pomacea spp.) following exposure to drought conditions,” resulted from work that Glasheen conducted in Uruguay as part of a National Science Foundation International Research Experiences for Students (IRES) program co-directed by Professor of Biology Romi Burks and Howard University colleague Dr. Kenneth Hayes. Uruguayan partners Dr. Mariana Meerhoff and M.Sc. Clementina Clavo followed the recovery of the snails after the U.S. team returned in January of 2015.  A close-up photo of the field habitat will grace the cover of the journal when published in June.

  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano and seven of her students presented papers at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association in San Antonio March 31–April 2. Sarah Matthews, Class of 2017, Kayleigh Thomas, Maddie Straup, and Martin Martinez, all Class of 2018, presented “Not cool, dude: Perceptions of solicited vs. unsolicited sext messages from men and women”; and Marissa Rosa, Brooke Swift, and Helena Lorenz, all Class of 2018, presented “LOL, ILY: The effects of textspeak and gender on dating profile perceptions.”

March 2017

  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi and Makaela Starks, Class of 2017, presented their project titled “Online Retail Privacy Policies: Consumer, Manager, and Legal Insights” at the Texas Marketing Faculty Research Colloquium at Baylor University held March 23–24.

  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti accepted an invitation from the political science department at Trinity University in San Antonio to present a paper on March 23, 2017. She presented a talk, titled “The Experience of Meaningful Democracy: Adorno in America,” that drew from her recent book, Adorno and Democracy: The American Years (University Press of Kentucky, 2017).

  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes authored a book chapter titled “On Women and Dwarves: Material Engagements in the Brothers Grimm’s Kinder- und Hausmärchen” in the book Tracing the Footsteps of Dwarfs: Images, Concepts and Representations in Popular Culture.

  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum has had two publications co-authored with students accepted to the Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference taking place in July 2017. Both publications are based on research done last summer as part of SCOPE (Summer Collaborative Opportunities and Experiences). “Comparing Direct and Indirect Encodings Using Both Raw and Hand-Designed Features in Tetris,” a full paper written with Lauren Gillespie, Class of 2019, and alumna Gabriela Gonzalez ’16, will be presented as a talk at the conference. “Balancing Selection Pressures, Multiple Objectives, and Neural Modularity to Coevolve Cooperative Agent Behavior,” an extended abstract written with Alex Rollins, Class of 2017, will be presented as a poster.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing John Pipkin has been awarded a Yaddo Residential Fellowship (Saratoga Springs, NY) to work on his new novel about the Tour de France under Hitler.  The prize is prestigious: “Collectively, Yaddo artists have won 74 Pulitzer Prizes, 29 MacArthur Fellowships, 68 National Book Awards, and a Nobel Prize (Saul Bellow, who won the Nobel for Literature in 1976). Notable Yaddo artists through the turn of the millennium include James Baldwin, Leonard Bernstein, Truman Capote, Aaron Copland, Philip Guston, Patricia Highsmith, Langston Hughes, Ted Hughes, Jacob Lawrence, Sylvia Plath, Martin Puryear, Katherine Anne Porter, Amy Sillman, Clyfford Still, and David Foster Wallace. More recent guests include Terry Adkins, Laurie Anderson, Jeffrey Eugenides, Sheri Fink, and Matthew Weiner” (www.yaddo.org).

  • Professor and Chair of English Eileen Cleere delivered a paper at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Association (INCS) Conference in Philadelphia, Pa., March 17–20. Her paper, “The School Story for Girls, 1872–1929: A Sublimation of Sensation,” was partly based on her 2015 and 2016 faculty-student research, combined with her own new project on post-Freudian psychology and adolescent fiction. Cleere also serves on the Governing Board of INCS.

  • Technical Assistant and Exhibitions Coordinator Seth Daulton exhibited a conference-sponsored themed exchange portfolio titled “Those Who Arrive Survive” during the Southern Graphics Conference International in Atlanta, Ga., March 15–19. The portfolio featured small books produced by artists from across the country. This conference, the largest of its kind, brings together national and international printmakers for panels, portfolios, demonstrations, exhibitions, and discourse on contemporary printmaking practices.

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published an essay titled “Identity Crisis: The White Jewish Question Posed in THE HUMAN STAIN” in Washington Independent Review of Books.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel is featured in an exhibition titled “Mixed Feelings: The Irreverent Object” at Mt. Hood Community College in Gresham, Ore. The exhibition examines how ceramic art, rooted in the domestic, plays an active role in reflecting and shaping identities. The exhibition is part of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts (NCECA) annual conference, March 22–25 in Portland, Ore.

  • Twenty-two Southwestern students traveled to the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor to attend the 120th meeting of the Texas Academy of Science (TAS), March 4–5. Collectively, Southwestern students gave four oral presentations and presented 12 posters in numerous sections of the Academy including Conservation Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology, Computer Science, Environmental Science, Physics, Systematics and Evolution, Freshwater Science, and Science Education. Much of the work presented at TAS took place in past summer SCOPE programs. Several students and alumni received awards:

    • Victoria Gore, Class of 2017, received the Best Oral Presentation Award in the Environmental Science Section for her work, “Extreme Precipitation: Changes in Rain Frequency from 1895-2015 in Central Texas.”  Gore worked on this project during SCOPE with her mentor Part-Time Assistant Professor of Physics Rebecca Edwards.

    • Bella Ferranti, Class of  2017, received the Best Oral Presentation Award in the Physics Section for her talk, “Laser Frequency Combs and the Search for Exoplanets.”  This is the second presentation that Ferranti has given at the Texas Academy of Sciences.

    • Lauren Gillespie, Class of 2019, received the Best Poster Presentation Award in Mathematics and Computer Science for her work entitled “Evolving Tetris Players Using Raw Screen Inputs,” which she worked on with Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum.

    • Sofia Campos ’16 took the Best Poster prize in the Systematics and Evolution Section and also won 2nd place overall for her presentation, “Cryptic yet curiously common: Population genetic structure and diversity of a cryptic Pomacea sp. and its better known congeneric P. canaliculata,”  which summarized her work in Uruguay with Professor of Biology Romi Burks.

    • Madison Granier, Class of 2019, received the Best Poster prize in the Conservation Biology section and also received a $1500 grant from the Academy to support her undergraduate research titled “Snail Slime in Real Time: qPCR Detection of Environmental DNA using Apple Snails.”  This work involves a collaboration between Granier, Burks and alumni Matthew Barnes ’06, now an Assistant Professor at Texas Tech University.

    • Carissa Bishop, Class of 2017, won two presentation awards: Best Oral Presentation in Freshwater Science, for her talk entitled “Applying Band-Aids: Challenges associated with molecular detection of Angiostronglyus cantonensis infection within Uruguayan and Brazilian apple snails,” and a Poster Award in Science Education for a collaborative project titled “Innovating molecular art: Communicating the true cost of science through repurposed materials.” Campos ’16, Shannon Walsh and Hugo Cepeda, both Class of 2018, all made contributions to the molecular art piece based on research that they have done with Burks. All of the molecular work has been made possible through a grant awarded to the Natural Sciences by the Keck Foundation.

    Other TAS presenters included Alex Taylor, Renee Walker, Morgan O’Neal, Jillian Bradley, Daniel Gonzalez, Eris Tock, Alex Rollins, and Jiawen Zhang, all Class of 2017, Ramesh Nadeem, Dakota Butler, Diana Beltran, Susan Beltran, and Madelyn Akers, all Class of 2018. Additional faculty mentors included Professor of Chemistry Kerry Bruns, Assistant Professor of Chemistry Michael Gesinski, Professor of Biology Ben Pierce,  and Part-Time Assistant Professor of Biology Airon Wills.

  • Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Faculty Alisa Gaunder published a book titled Japanese Politics and Government with Routledge in March 2017. This book investigates Japanese politics in the postwar era from theoretical and comparative perspectives offering an in-depth exploration of postwar political institutions, political reform in the 1990s, the policymaking process, and the politics of economic growth and stagnation. It also draws attention to key policy issues including women and work, immigration, Japanese aging/low fertility society, security and trade.

  • Southwestern’s Studio Art Department in the Department of Art and Art History has been listed as among the “25 Small Colleges and Universities Strong in Art and Design” in The Fiske Guide to Colleges. The department has received this recognition annually since 2006. Edited by Edward B. Fiske, former education editor for The New York Times, The Fiske Guide serves as a respected, authoritative sourcebook comprising 320+ four-year schools, and is fully updated and expanded annually.

  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis recently participated as a flutist, singer, and featured composer in the inaugural concert of Inversion Ensemble, a choral collaborative dedicated to the presentation of new choral works. The Feb. 25 concert in Austin included Inglis’ compositions “In Heaven and on Earth” for chorus, flute and clàrsach, and “On the Mystery of the Incarnation” for chorus and strings.

  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti gave an invited lecture at Oklahoma City University on March 2. Her talk drew from her new book project and was titled “The Common Benefits Clause: Working Against Neoliberal Oligarchy Through U.S. State Constitutions.”

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi traveled to Mississippi University for Women and presented a lecture recital, “Songs of the Boulanger Sisters,” at the inaugural Music by Women Festival, March 3–4. Dr. Chuck Dillard, area coordinator for collaborative piano at Portland State University, collaborated on the performance portion of the lecture recital.

  • Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower delivered a paper titled “A Threshold Moment: Public Sector Organizing and Civil Rights Unionism in the Postwar South” at the biennial meeting of the Southern Labor Studies Association in Tampa, Fla. He also chaired and commented on a panel discussion titled “Organizing the New, New South: Labor Unions and Employers in the South during the 1970s and 1980s.”

  • Professor of Biology Ben Pierce was featured in the article “Untangling the Social Web of Frog Choruses” in the March 2017 issue of The Scientist.

  • Director of Special Collections and Archives Jason Dean and Emily Grover ’16 co-authored an article about using social media as a tool for teaching reference works for rare books to undergraduates in the field. They highlight the necessity of these works, as well as the education of undergraduates in the fundamentals of descriptive bibliography, expanding on Grover’s time as a fellow last summer in the Rare Books and Manuscripts Division of the Library of Congress. The piece will be published in the Spring 2017 issue of RBM: A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage. RBM is the Association of College and Research Libraries’ journal covering issues pertaining to special collections libraries and cultural heritage institutions; the preeminent journal in the field.

  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer was invited to share a work in progress with the Department of Anthropology at Rice University as part of their brown bag series. Her presentation explored race and disability in relation to notions of mourning, loss, and death. While at Rice, Kafer also met with graduate students and led two workshops with undergraduate students in the “Disability Inside Out” class.

  • Sports Information Director Megan Hardin was announced as the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) College Division Rising Star on March 1. The award is one of seven major awards presented to current sports information directors annually at the CoSIDA national convention and is presented to both a university division and a college division member with 10 years of service or less whose work at their institution and service, dedication, energy and enthusiasm to the profession make that individual a “rising star” in athletic communications. Hardin will be presented with the award in Orlando in June at the annual national convention.

  • Studio Arts Technician Daniel Gardner presented a wheel-thrown ceramics workshop at Baylor University in Waco, Texas on Feb. 27.

  • Professor of Spanish Laura Senio Blair, Mattie Cryer, Class of 2017, and Antonio Mendez, Class of 2020, served as coaches at SXSWedu on March 7. Senio Blair met with attendees interested in the liberal arts, Cryer spoke about undergraduate research, and Mendez mentored first-generation college students. The meetings were one-on-one or small group opportunities for students, parents, and attendees to think about and explore their learning goals.

  • Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes and Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented their documentary film “Out of the Shadows: German Stories of Love, War and Faith” at the Texas German Heritage Society on Feb. 26. This oral history project explores the stories of Germans who were children during WWII and later emigrated to the United States. The project was funded through a Sam Taylor Fellowship. A screening and discussion at Southwestern is scheduled for March 30 at 6:30 p.m.

February 2017

  • President Edward Burger delivered the 2017 Richard Anderson Lecture at the Louisiana and Mississippi Section of the Mathematical Association of America’s Annual Meeting on Feb. 17 at Millsaps College.

  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer gave an invited talk at Vanderbilt University on Feb. 23. Her talk, “Wanting: Disability in Relation,” discussed disability in the context of other movements for social justice. While at Vanderbilt, she participated in a workshop with the Disability Justice Caucus of the Nashville Feminist Collective.

  • Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore delivered the keynote address at the Black History Month celebration hosted by the Sun City Ebony Ladies organization on Saturday, Feb. 28, and performed an original poem titled Black Beauty that was written to disrupt the harmful impact of colorism that exists between and within communities of color. Moore also presented “At the Crossroads of Equality: Paths to Liberation and Progress in Academia,” in honor of Black History Month, on Feb. 8 at the Williamson Museum’s Salon. The Williamson Museum’s Salon is a monthly speaker series that features leading professionals and researchers in their respective fields.

  • Professor of Political Science and Tower-Hester Chair Tim O’Neill’s article “New Directions in Anti-Terrorism Policy” has been accepted for publication in the journal Studies in Conflict & Terrorism. Another article, “The Canucks, Brits and Yanks:  Creative Anti-Terrorist Policy Making in the 21st Century,” will appear in the Winter 2017 edition of the Journal of Conflict and Security Law.  He has also signed a contract with Sage/CQ Press for a textbook on American Politics tentatively titled The Quest for Fair and Effective Government: The American Experience.

  • Professor of English David Gaines presented “Dylan’s Nobel Prize and Its Meaning” to the Congregation Havurah Shalom in Georgetown on Feb. 26.

  • Associate Professor of Theatre Kerry Bechtel recently designed the costumes for Unity Theatre’s production of The Diary of Anne Frank.  This production opened on Feb. 10, 2017 and will continue its run through the beginning of March. Brandy Giordano, Class of 2017, worked as both costume design assistant and costume technician on the production. Unity Theatre is professional theatre company located in historic Brenham, TX.

  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller gave an invited lecture titled “Beyond the Five Colors: Reconsidering Purple and Its Sources in Ancient China” at Columbia University in New York on Feb. 17. The lecture was part of the Early China Seminar Lecture Series, sponsored by the Tang Center for Early China, the Department for East Asian Languages and Cultures, and The Columbia University Seminars.

  • Professor of Art and Art History, Chair of Art History, and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Thomas Howe has just published an article “Stabiae: A Draught Sustainability Master Plan after the Model of Aerospace” in Atti dei Convegni, no. 306 (Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, Roma, 2017) 205-222. This article was first presented in Italian at the conference XXXIII Giornata dell’Ambiente: Resilienza delle città d’arte ai terremoti/Enhancing the Resilience of Historic Sites to Earthquakes, Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei Roma on November 3-4, 2015. The Lincei (“Lynxes”) is the oldest and possibly most prestigious scientific academy in Europe; Gallileo was a co-founder in 1602.

  • Austin Mueck, Class of 2018, received a Best Scenic Design Award for his design of the musical, You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown at the 2017 Texas Educational Theatre Association Conference in Galveston. Associate Professor of Theatre and Resident Scenic Designer Desiderio Roybal mentored and advised Mueck’s poster presentation at the TETA Conference. Mueck designed You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown for the Southwestern University Theatre Department in November 2016 under the mentorship of Roybal and Southwestern Technical Director Justin J. Smith ’04.

  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 performs the role of “Fairy” in Verdi’s brilliant comedic opera Falstaff with the San Diego Opera, directed by Olivier Tambosi and conducted by Daniele Callegari.  Performances take place at the San Diego Civic Theatre February 18, 21, 24, and 26.  The San Diego Opera is ranked among the top 10 opera companies in the United States. For more information visit sdopera.org.

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura published an article titled “The Image of a Square” in the February edition of American Mathematical Monthly, with co-authors Annalisa Crannell and Marc Frantz.

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari is a finalist in the 2016 American Prize Competition in Community Orchestra Conducting. The American Prize competitions are national awards judged via submission of recorded video performances. Ferrari’s video entry was of the Shostakovich 5th Symphony and the Marquez Danzon No. 2, both with the Austin Civic Orchestra.

  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger was invited to deliver a paper titled “The Foreign Words and Worlds of Twelfth Night” at the conference Global Chaucer and Shakespeare in the Digital World held at George Washington University. He also performed a show at the intermission, featuring his impression of Kenneth Branagh and Alan Rickman. His visit was graciously hosted by George Washington University and the George Washington Digital Humanities Institute.

  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes published an article titled “Ramadan in the Republic: Imperial necessity and local religious assistance to Muslim migrants” in a special issue of French Cultural Studies: “Religion in France: Belief, identity and laïcité.”

  • Professor of Art and Art History and Coordinator General of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Thomas Howe has been invited to lecture on his recent work on the Roman Villas of Stabiae, Italy, at the École Française d’Athènes on Feb. 20. The lecture will summarize the fieldwork of thirty-five institutions from over a dozen countries since 2007. The work included major excavation, garden study, conservation and architectural recording. The lecture will be part of the Kyklos series of lectures sponsored in part by the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Klassische Archäologie - Winckelmann-Institut and Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Athens, Greece.

  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Physics Rebecca Edwards attended the 97th Annual Meeting of the American Meteorological Society Jan. 22–26 in Seattle, Wash. At the meeting, physics student Oliver Sale, Class of 2017, presented a poster titled “Investigation of Central Texas Surface Ozone Concentrations 1980–2015,” which resulted from work he did with Edwards and Dr. Gary Morris of St. Edward’s University as part of the SCOPE program (Summer 2016) and as part of his capstone research with Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton.

  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower presented a paper titled “’We could not suffer it’: Kings, Popes, and the Construction of British Empire, ca. 1450–1550” before the Ecclesiastical History Society’s Winter Meeting at Magdalene College at Cambridge University in Cambridge, England on Jan. 14. The conference theme was “Church and Empire.”

  • Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore delivered the keynote address for the Black History Month celebration at the historic Round Rock Sweet Home Pinnacle of Praise on Saturday, Jan. 28. The address was anchored by the National 2017 Black History Month Theme: The Crisis in Black Education and provided statistics about the disproportionate impact of K–12 school suspension and expulsion on students of color in southern states. In celebration of the occasion, several Round Rock dignitaries were in attendance.

  • Associate Professor of Education and Co-Editor of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History: Black History Bulletin Alicia Moore was featured in a recent edition of the Berkeley Review of Education. Ten Tips for Facilitating Classroom Discussions on Sensitive Topics, by Alicia Moore and Molly Deshaies ’12, “provides a foundation of confidence for the teacher and can be used in elementary, secondary, or post-secondary settings.” Moore is a networked leader who collaborates with colleagues to broaden participation and concurrently organizes resistance and advocates for systemic improvements in social justice through knowledge.

January 2017

  • President Edward Burger was invited to address the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board at their quarterly meeting to speak on Southwestern University and issues of higher education. He brought with him Southwestern students Mac Light, Class of 2017, Mylien Tran, Elizabeth Wright, both Class of 2018, and Jasper Stone, Class of 2019, who also engaged with the Board. The meeting was broadcasted and has been archived here.  (Southwestern University is introduced at 1:09:50).

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura developed a TED-Ed video lesson on the Mathematics of Sidewalk Illusions, animated by Jeremiah Dickey. She developed the idea for the lesson, wrote the script and developed discussion questions and a “dig deeper” section.

  • Professor of Art Mary Visser has new artwork in The International Group exhibition 3D Glitch, curated by James Hutchinson. The exhibit runs Jan. 19–Feb. 10, 2017 at the Filodrammatica Gallery in Korzo, Croatia.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor published an article titled “Assessing Undergraduate Student Learning in Political Science: Development and Implementation of the ‘PACKS’ Survey” in PS: Political Science and Politics.  Sydnor was also invited to present her research on “The Interaction of Political Incivility and Psychological Conflict Orientation” as part of the University of Texas Moody College of Communication’s Political Communication Lecture Series. She also presented a poster on the same topic at this year’s meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

  • Visiting Professor of Art Ron Geibel’s work was selected to be part of the 30th annual Materials: Hard + Soft International Contemporary Craft Competition and Exhibition at the Patterson-Appleton Arts Center in Denton, Feb. 3–May 6, 2017. The exhibition was curated by JoAnn Edwards, Executive Director of the Museum of Craft and Design in San Francisco.

  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal was awarded Best Scenic Design of a Play for 2016 by the Central Texas Excellence in Theatre Award Committee for his work on Arthur Miller’s “The Price.” Austin Mueck, Class of 2018, served as Assistant Scenic Designer for “The Price.” The Scenic Designs under review came from all plays produced by theatres in Austin and the Greater Austin area during 2016.


    David Jarrott Productions, production company for “The Price,” also received awards for Best Production of a Play and Best Leading Actor in a Play. Jarrott Productions has commissioned Roybal to design scenery for Rory Kinnear’s “The Herd” opening April 2017 in Austin. Mueck will again serve as Assistant Scenic Designer and will also serve as Production Assistant to the Producer during the run of the play.

  • Several Psychology students and faculty presented their work at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Jan. 19–21 in San Antonio.

    • Aaron Garcia, Class of 2017, Skylar Smith ’16, Nicki Ahearn ’16, Casey Niblett ’16, and Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano presented “The battle against bedroom boredom: Sexual novelty and sexual satisfaction in relationships.”
    • Michael Gallegos, Class of 2017, Marieke Visser ’16, Najmu Mohseen ’16, Deisy Gonzales ’16, Cameron Smeltzer ’16, and Assistant Professor of Psychology Erin Crockett presented “When the Pen becomes the Cure: The physiological impact of suppression and expression.”
    • Julie Swets, Class of 2018, Roanne Shoubaki ’16, and former Southwestern Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology Laura Hennefield presented “Feminism and Attractiveness: Feminist Speech Boosts Attractiveness in Females and Lowers Attractiveness in Males.”
  • Professor of Art History Thomas Howe will give a lecture to the Georgetown Women’s Club on recent work on the Stabiae project of Roma Villas near Pompeii, Italy on Feb. 8 at the Georgetown Public Library.

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth was appointed as DAAD Ortslektor. The  Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst, German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) recognized Berroth, also a DAAD alumna, for her work as resident expert/multiplier in German Studies, with local, regional, and national outreach through her work for the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) in the Texas AATG Chapters, at national conferences, and in her leadership roles on national committees. This appointment provides her with access to competitive DAAD funding including access to support from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research through grants for teaching and research materials. Berroth’s first materials grant recently arrived at Southwestern in two large boxes filled with books on:

    • Refugees and Migration (21 titles)
    • Foundations in teaching German as a Foreign Language (17 titles)
    • Games to be used in Teaching German as a Foreign Language (9 games/quizzes)
    • Selection of top literary publications in 2016 (24 titles)
    • Annual subscriptions for Der Spiegel and a Pedagogy Journals
  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 performed in “Ladies Who Lunch” with the Austin Chamber Ensemble Jan. 13–14. This innovative program weaves the lives of three women: a seasoned socialite, a business woman, and a young bride. An attentive, meddling and haughty waiter also delivers candid commentary on the “Ladies Who Lunch.” The ladies and the waiter articulate everything about their lifestyles and personas through a wide range of musical repertoire including operatic arias, art songs, and musical theatre. While their individuality shines through, their lives become gradually intertwined into a cacophony of sound reflecting the frivolities of life, joy, hope, promise, disappointment, regrets, insanity, mortality, and ultimately, peace.

  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa gave an invited presentation titled “The Javanese Gamelan and Its Influence on the Music of Debussy” at Pesta Indonesia, a multidisciplinary conference focusing on historical and cultural relationships between Indonesia and the West. The conference was held at the Institut Politécnico de Leiria (IPL), Leiria, Portugal, on Dec. 15, 2016.

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth has been appointed to serve on the American Association of Teacher of German’s Alle lernen Deutsch Committee by AATG President Hal Boland. This national committee fosters the recruitment of students and teachers from underrepresented groups to the teaching and learning of German. The committee disseminates information about underrepresented populations in the teaching and learning of German in the U.S. and creates materials for the German classroom that highlight the diversity of German-speaking countries.

  • Southwestern had a great showing at the Joint Mathematics Meeting, the largest meeting of mathematicians in the world, held Jan. 4–7 in Atlanta, Ga. Six faculty, eight students, and an alumna participated in multiple ways.

    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr was very active at this meeting.  As the Secretary/Treasurer of the IBL SIGMAA (Inquiry-Based Learning Special Interest Group of the Mathematical Association of America), she helped organize the MAA Session on Inquiry-Based Teaching and Learning; this topic needed five sessions because of its importance, relevance, and national attention. She also co-organized the MAA Panel “Perspectives on Inquiry-Based Learning: Novice, Experienced, and Master,” and helped run the first IBL SIGMAA business meeting. She also presented “Broadening the Net: Promoting Success in the Sciences for All Students” at the MAA Poster Session on Projects Supported by the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education. Poster co-authors include  Professor of Chemistry Emily D. Niemeyer, Associate Professor of Physics Mark Bottorff, Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony, and Director of General Chemistry Labs Willis A. Weigand. She was also a co-author on a paper, “Coprime and prime labelings of ladder graphs and complete bipartite graphs,” presented in the AMS Special Session on RE(UF)search on Graphs and Matrices.
    • Visiting Assistant Professor John Ross and Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton co-presented “Supermarkets, Highways, and Oil Production: Statistics and Social Justice.” This work began with participation in an ACS workshop, “Mathematics and Social Justice,” May 21–22, 2016 at Rollins College.
    • Ross and Visiting Assistant Professor Linda DiLullo participated in the workshop “Preparing Students for Success in Calculus: Aligning Placement, Curriculum, and Assessment” offered through the MAA under an NSF grant.
    • Shelton co-presented the MAA Minicourse on Teaching Modeling-First Differential Equations—Technology and Complete End Game Effort, attended the MAA Section Officers’ Meeting as Past Chair of the Texas Section, and organized funding and logistics for Southwestern’s student and alum presenters and attendees.
    • Professor of Mathematics Kendall Richards co-organized the AMS Special Session on Complex Analysis and Special Functions.
    • Alumna Julia R. Sykora ’16 presented “3D Mathematical Models For the Blind” in the MAA Session on Methods of Engaging Math Learners with Physical Impairments. This was based on her 2015–16 King Creativity Project with Allison K. Young ’16 supervised by Shelton.
    • Southwestern students also presented at the AMS Contributed Paper Session on Undergraduate Research:
      • William Soller, Class of 2017, and Kristen McCrary, Class of 2018, presented “Existence, Uniqueness, and Cost-Optimizing Results of Mathematical Trusses” based on their 2016 SCOPE work supervised by Ross.
      • Morgan Engle and Penny Phan, both Class of 2018, presented “Green Math: Models of Greenhouse Gasses” from the 2016 SCOPE work supervised by Shelton.
      • Oliver Sale, Class of 2017, presented “Investigation of Central Texas Surface Ozone Concentrations 1980–2015” on work that began in 2016 SCOPE supervised by Part-Time Assistant Professor of Physics Rebecca Edwards. In Fall 2016, Sale continued the work in his mathematics capstone; Edwards continued to primarily oversee the project, and Shelton oversaw the math capstone and prepared Sale for the presentation.
      • Victoria Gore, Class of 2017, presented “Extreme Precipitation: Changes in Rain Frequency from 1895–2015 in Central Texas” from the 2016 SCOPE work supervised by Edwards.
      • Beulah Agyemang-Barimah, Class of 2017, received funding from Southwestern’s Keck Foundation grant to attend sessions on mathematical and computational biology.
      • Emma Kathryn Groves, Class of 2017, also attended the meetings.
  • Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer and HHMI Inquiry Initiative Program Coordinator Katie McCance ’15 published an article titled “Influence of plant maturity on anthocyanin concentrations, phenolic composition, and antioxidant properties of 3 purple basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) cultivars” in the October 2016 issue of the Journal of Food Composition and Analysis. The article was based on McCance’s senior honors thesis with Patrick Flanigan ’12 and collaborators at the University of Texas at Austin as co-authors. The research was completed with support from HHMI, the Welch Foundation, and Southwestern’s Dishman Endowment and Faculty-Student Projects Fund.

  • Professor of English David Gaines presented “Tales from the Dylan Trade: Music, Literature, Teaching, and ‘Nobelity’” at the Williamson County Museum’s Jan. 11 Salon.

  • President Edward Burger was elected to the Board of Directors of the Council of Independent Colleges at their annual board meeting on Jan. 4 at the CIC’s President’s Institute held in Orlando, Fla. While in Orlando, he was invited to visit Lake Highland Preparatory School, where he met with college counselors, addressed math and science teachers, and taught an AP Calculus class.

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers presented “The Jewish Movies of Rob Epstein” at the annual meeting of the Association for Jewish Studies in San Diego, Calif. She also published “Celebrating 7 Jewish ‘Nasty Women’ of 2016” in Lilith Magazine’s blog.

  • Professor of Art History Kimberly Smith published an essay titled “Maria Marc’s Letters” in the anthology Marianne Werefkin and the Woman Artists in Her Circle (Brill Rodopi, 2017). The essay argues that the assemblage of texts by Maria Marc—letters, postcards, widow’s signatures, provenance notes, etc.— form the literary tissue against and within which Franz Marc’s art emerged, and thus should be recognized as a generative act central to the Expressionist aesthetic.

  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes debuted as an official contributor to the Lawyers, Guns, and Money blog. Her first post, “2016 – Year of Complacency,” is on the importance of remembering as a means to combat complacency.

  • Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci and a number of her students recently published an article titled “An Acute, Non-Therapeutic Dose of Methylphenidate Disrupts Partner Preference in Female Rats” in Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior describing the effects of a high dose of methylphenidate on sexual motivation in female rats. This research was supported by the HHMI program during the previous two years. Alexa Gomez, Class of 2017, and alumni Alex Petrucci ’16 and Jessica Morales Valenzuela ’15 are co-authors.

  • Head Football Coach Joe Austin and football student-athletes Bryan Hicks, Class of 2018, Zach Cole, Tyler Frisby, Matt Gillen, Dereck Harenda, Jacob Harton, Dante Smith and Dylan Wilburn, all Class of 2017, represented the United States in an international competition against Mexico at the 18th annual Tazon de Estrellas (Bowl of the Stars) All-Star Game, hosted by Centro de Enseñanza Técnica y Superior (CETYS) University in Mexicali, Mexico. The game pits all-stars from NCAA Division III against all-stars from Mexico’s La Comisión Nacional Deportiva Estudiantil de Instituciones Privadas (CONADEIP) Division I. Team Mexico won despite Hicks and Gillen connection for a touchdown pass in the third quarter. Austin has been invited to coach at this event seven times, including four as the offensive coordinator. In what is always a very competitive match-up, Austin has a 4–3 record over his seven years. This year, Southwestern tied Central College (IA) for the most represented players from a single school (with eight).

  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Howe gave an invited lecture “Further Thoughts on the Arrival of the Greek Monumental Orders and the Autodidact Polymath Architekton” at the conference Ex Ionia Scientia: ‘Knowledge’ in Archaic Greece at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens on Dec. 12, 2016. Howe was also invited to publish this lecture in The Acts of the Conference as well as contribute a book chapter on “How to Build the First Giant Ionic Temples.” Additionally, he was invited back to Athens to lecture at the German Archaeological Institute on Feb. 20, 2016. During his stay in Athens, Howe also visited the director of College Year in Athens with a view to developing collaboration in study abroad with the Vesuvian Institute of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation.

  • Assistant Professor of Economics Patrick Van Horn presented his paper “Leverage, Liability, and Commercial Banks: Evidence from the Booms before the Great Depression and Great Recession” at the Banking and Financial Crises—Lessons from History Conference held at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago on Dec. 16, 2016.

  • Associate Dean of the Sarofim School of Fine Arts and Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa was awarded 3rd place in the 2016 American Prize Competition in Piano Performance (Lorin Hollander Award—Concerto). The American Prize competitions are national awards adjudicated through submission of recorded performances. Tamagawa’s  performance was of the Mozart Piano Concerto in C major, K. 503 with the Austin Symphony Orchestra, Peter Bay, conductor, recorded live in November 2014.

December 2016

  • Professor of English David Gaines visited Stockholm for Nobel Week. On Monday, Dec. 5, he appeared with Sir Christopher Ricks of Boston University as a scholarly expert on Bob Dylan in the official Swedish documentary about this year’s recipient for Literature. Two of his reports about the week appeared in The Austin Chronicle Dec. 10 and Dec. 12. He reported more from Stockholm in his new blog “The Big Tent.” In addition, his chapter, “Teaching Dylan,” appeared in PROFESSING DYLAN (PhillipsMemphis Publishing), a volume about Dylan pedagogy edited by Frances Downing Hunter.

  • Associate Professor of Education Alicia L. Moore was interviewed by Tom Hall of National Public Radio’s “Midday” on Dec. 8. The conversation was broadcast that afternoon on Baltimore’s NPR station, WYPR 88.1 FM. Moore collaborated with New York Emmy-nominated documentary filmmaker Dr. Kaye Wise-Whitehead and Dr. Regina Lewis to develop the Trump Syllabus K-12: Lesson Plans for Teaching During this New Age of Resistance (#TrumpSyllabusK12). The lesson plans provide ideas for teaching about the 2016 presidential election.

  • Part-Time Assistant Director of Music and Director of the Southwestern Jazz Band David Guidi was recently invited to serve as the conductor of the Texas Music Educators Association (TMEA) Region 32 Jazz Band. This ensemble comprises high school students who went through a competitive selection process culminating in a concert held at Glenn High School in Leander. The program included:

    • Don’t Get Sassy by Thad Jones, arr. Mike Carubia
    • Mambo Inn by Grace Sampson, George Woodlen, and Mario Bauza
    • Big Heart Lament by David Guidi
    • Hooked by David Guidi
    • El Nino by Joey Calderazzo, arr. Vince Norman
    • Moanin’ by Charles Mingus, arr. Sy Johnson
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi won an Honorable Mention for Exceptional Repertoire in the 2016 American Prize Competition. Zenobi’s entry included recordings of art songs by Nadia and Lili Boulanger, Alma Schindler Mahler, Pauline Viardot-Garcia, and Barbara Strozzi, performed with pianist Chuck Dillard and bassoonist Kristin Wolfe Jensen. It also included a recording of Love While You May, a song cycle by Ashley H. Kraft ’14 which premiered at Southwestern with trombonist and retired Southwestern faculty, Eileen Meyer-Russell.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower delivered a pre-circulated paper titled “You’ve Come a Long Way—Maybe: Pay Equity, Public Workers, and the Transformation of American Labor, 1964–1985,” to the D.C. Labor Studies Seminar at George Washington University on Dec. 10.

  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair Michael Cooper discovered and edited an unpublished concert aria by Mendelssohn. The aria was performed on Nov. 26–27 in the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam by acclaimed soprano Lisa Larsson, accompanied by the Netherlands Chamber Orchestra conducted by Gordan Nikolic, who also serves as violin soloist.

  • Associate Professor of Theatre Kerry Bechtel designed the costumes for two professional holiday productions: Fancy Nancy’s Splendiferous Christmas—which opened at Main Street Youth Theatre in Houston, TX in early November, and Little Women—which opened at Unity Theatre in Brenham, TX in early December. Bechtel was assisted on both productions by current Southwestern theatre major Brandy Giordano, class of 2017. In addition, several Southwestern Theatre Costume Laboratory students participated in the construction of the costumes for both productions.

  • Seven Southwestern faculty members were awarded a prestigious Sam Taylor Fellowship Grant. The 2016 recipients include:

    • Professor of Physics Steven Alexander, “Creating a Wave-Powered Robot,” $1,200
    • Associate Professor of Music David Asbury, “Research at the Library of Congress and the University of South Carolina Related to the Correspondence of Andrés Segovia and Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco,” $1,100
    • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth, “Learning Arabic to Teach the Syrian Refugee Crisis: Inclusiveness and Diversity in the German Classroom,” $1,750
    • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky, “Examining Excavated Aztec Sculptures and Offerings in the Templo Mayor Museum and Museo Nacional de Antropología,” $1,220
    • Associate Professor of French Aaron Prevots, “Gestures Toward the Sacred: Guillevic, Vargaftig, Tellerman, Michel,” $1,500
    • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar, “Beyond the “Wicked Stepmother”: Representations of Stepmothers in Popular Culture,” $1,830
    • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross, “Immigration in Spain: The Cultural Effects of Otherness,” $1,500
  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones was the guest speaker of the History and Philosophy of Science Colloquium at the University of Texas, Austin, on Nov. 18. His talk titled “Medicine in Revolution: Mapping Homeopathy into the Landscape of Mexican Medical Science, 1861-1934” examined the tensions among several medical theories in the projects to bring European medical science to modernize national medical institutions and to provide scientific medical training to the Mexican population.

  • Professor of Art History Thomas Howe has been invited to present the lecture, “Further Thoughts on the Arrival of the Greek Monumental Orders and the Autodidact Polymath Architekton” at the conference Ex Ionia Scientia: ‘Knowledge’ in Archaic Greece at the National and Kapodistrian University in Athens, Greece from Dec. 11-14. The paper is a response to recent interest in his dissertation, The Invention of the Doric Order (Harvard, 1985).

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth and Part-Time Assistant Professor of German Michelle Reyes participated in the 2016 joint conference of the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) and the American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages (ACTFL) on Nov. 18-20 in Boston, Mass. Berroth organized and chaired a panel sponsored by the Coalition of Women in German. Reyes’ paper titled “Domesticity Reimagined: Shirts and Female Empowerment in The Six Swans” contributed to this panel, which was dedicated to showcasing feminist approaches to teaching fairy tales and integrating New Materialist theories. Berroth presented a paper titled “Empathy: Genres for Teaching and Learning Compassionately about Syria and Refugee Experiences” contributing to a series of two panels dedicated to “Teaching the Syrian Refugee Crisis in the DACHL Curriculum.” As an appointed member, Berroth also participated in the annual meeting of Alle lernen Deutsch, a committee representing AATG’s long-standing commitment to affirming diversity in the study of German language and German-speaking peoples and their cultures.

  • Director of Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship Julie Sievers co-presented on “Rhetorics of College Teaching: Teaching Statements and Disciplinary Discourses” at the Annual Meeting of the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Louisville, Ky. on Nov. 11. She also served on the conference team as co-chair for the interactive sessions.

  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony published an article on “How Well Do Doodle Polls Do” in the Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Social Informatics (SocInfo16).

  • President Edward Burger delivered the keynote address “Effective Thinking and Creative Puzzle-Solving” at the Annual Meeting of the South Carolina Council of Teacher of Mathematics on Nov. 10. He also gave the opening address at the Breakthrough Collaborative National Conference in Austin on Nov. 15. The conference promotes undergraduate education for first-generation students. His presentation was titled “A Vision for Education to Empower Individuals to Flourish.” On Dec. 5, he delivered an invited address in Atlanta, Ga. at the 2016 SACSCOC Annual Meeting on academic leadership and institutional change.

November 2016

  • Professor of Theatre John Ore served as the adjudicator for five Central Texas middle schools (District 25-2A) as they presented one-act plays and competed for three overall ”best production” trophies and eighteen acting awards on Nov. 16 at the Cultural Arts Center in Temple. Ore was delighted with the energy, commitment and talent evinced by the teachers and young thespians. Scenes from the following plays were presented: The Ransom of Red Chief, The Emperor’s New Clothes, The Curious Savage, The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, and Louder, I Can’t Hear You.

  • Professor of English David Gaines was interviewed on Nov. 17 by Robert Siegel of National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered.” Their conversation about Bob Dylan and the Nobel Prize was broadcast that afternoon on all NPR Stations. Gaines will be reporting from Stockholm, Sweden during the Nobel Prize ceremonies for NPR,The Austin Chronicle and The Chronicle of Higher Education.

  • Part-Time Instructor of Music Alisha Gabriel has written a biography for children titled Silentó: Breakout Rapper, to be published by The Child’s World in the fall of 2017.

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented her research in the Environmental Humanities at two conferences recently. At the South Central Modern Language Association (SCMLA) Annual Conference in Houston, TX, she presented her paper “Marica Bodrožić: Ecopoetics for the Anthropocene.” At the meeting of the European Association for the Study of Literature, Culture and Environment (ASLCE) in Brussels, Belgium, she presented her paper “Eco-poetics of Resilience: Slow Violence, Vibrant, Matter, Enlivenment, and the Affect of Material Kinship in the Work of Marica Bodrožić” and chaired a session on Climate Fiction in Northern Europe. Also, Monatshefte, a quarterly journal “at the forefront of American Germanistik,” invited Berroth to review the first comprehensive survey of ecocritical scholarship and approaches in German, Ecocriticim. Eine Einführung. Herausgegeben von Gabriele Dürbeck und Urte Stobbe. Köln: Böhlau, 2015.

  • Professor of Economics Emily Northrop presented “Citizens Building Political Will” at the online conference The World in 2050: Imagining and Creating Just Climate Futures. Northrop’s presentation describes the work of the Citizens’ Climate Lobby and the policy it promotes for putting a price on carbon. The conference was held Oct. 24-Nov. 21.

  • Visiting Professor of Creative Writing and English John Pipkin has agreed to join the Advisory Council for the new Pat Conroy Literary Center in Beaufort, SC. Conroy, who died in 2015, is best remembered for his semi-autobiographical novel, The Great Santini (1976), as well as The Prince of Tides (1991) and Beach Music (1995). The Center will be part museum and part classroom, and committed to developing and sustaining an inclusive reading and writing community.

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was part of a roundtable, “Ernesto Cardenal in Word and Action: Poetry, Politics, and Priesthood in 20th-Century Nicaragua,” including poet, priest, liberation theologian, and revolutionary Father Ernesto Cardenal and writer, revolutionary, and former Nicaraguan Vice President Sergio Ramírez. The roundtable celebrated the opening of the Ernesto Cardenal Papers at the University of Texas at Austin’s LLILAS Benson Latin American Studies and Collections.

  • Associate Professor of French Francis Mathieu delivered the keynote address at the biannual meeting of the American Association of Teachers of French - Central Texas Chapter, held at St. Edward’s University in Austin on Oct. 22, 2016. The title of his talk was “Teaching Intercultural Skills.”

  • For the first time in program history, the Southwestern volleyball team captured the NCAA Regional title, defeating No. 4 UT-Dallas on their home court 3-2 on Nov. 13. They advanced to the NCAA Quarterfinals, where they defeated Tufts University 3-2 on Nov. 17. The Pirates fell in the NCAA Final Four to Washington University-St. Louis, ending their historic run. Congratulations to Coach Don Flora and team on an outstanding season.

  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony published an article titled “Serve or skip: the power of rejection in online bottleneck matching” in the Journal of Combinatorial Optimization.

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “Shiva Ribbons, Not Safety Pins” in Lilith magazine’s blog. This essay for general readers, about the well-intentioned but problematic safety pin movement and her hopes for alliance politics, is informed by Meyers’ scholarship on difference, power, and resistance.

  • Associate Professor of French Francis Mathieu presented his paper titled “Confession as a Cure to Seduction in La Princesse de Clèves” at the 35th Annual Conference of the Society for Interdisciplinary French Seventeenth-Century Studies held at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H. Nov. 10–12.

  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 performed the role of operatic “Scare-rrator” in the Halloween spectacular,”’Twas All Hallows Eve” on Oct. 29, 2016 at the Austin Independent School District’s Performing Arts Center in Austin. The hour-long Halloween concert featured 150 choristers, a 75-piece symphonic band, and 50 dancers from the Austin area.  Proceeds went to the Arts and Fitness Program for Young Children.

  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross and Lauren Fellers ’14 presented the paper “From Mommyblogs to Blog-Books” as part of the conference of the Asociación Internacional de Literatura y Cultura Femenina Hispánica (AILFCH) in Houston on Nov. 11, 2016.

  • Professor of Music and Associate Dean for Fine Arts Kiyoshi Tamagawa had his article “Chopsticks, Golliwogs and Wigwams: The Need for Cultural Awareness in Piano Teaching Materials and Repertoire” accepted for publication in American Music Teacher, the journal of the Music Teachers National Association. The article explores how piano teaching materials that are still in use today can convey attitudes toward ethnic and cultural groups that do not reflect the progress being made in daily life.

  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal designed stage scenery for the new, Austin-based professional theatre company David Jarrott Productions in October. His design for Arthur Miller’s The Price was nominated for Best Scenic Design of a play by the BroadwayWorld Austin 2016 Awards Committee and also made the short list for the 2016-2017 B. Iden Payne Awards for Best Scenic Design. Austin Mueck, Class of 2018, served as Assistant Scenic Designer. All reviews applauded Roybal’s design. “Desiderio Roybal’s highly detailed set had an accurate scent. It was quite striking. Imagine any furniture-ridden attic or antique shop you’ve ever entered, and recall the nostalgic scent of old wood. That’s what filled the theater, and it laid the foundation for the recurring themes of age, time, and nostalgia that persist throughout The Price. Roybal clearly went the extra mile to ensure every square inch of the stage was utilized to some extent, decorating the intimate space with rugs, chairs, clothes, and walls of furniture that ensnare both the actors and the audience. And it remains the only set I’ve seen that offers a scent as part of the immersion,” Pearson Kashlak of Austin Entertainment Weekly said.

  • Visiting Professor of English and Creative Writing John Pipkin’s new novel, The Blind Astronomer’s Daughter, was reviewed by The New York Times on Nov. 6, 2016.

  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Communication Studies Lamiyah Bahrainwala will present her paper “Extracting the Construct of ‘Home’ from Domestic Labor Discourse” as part of the panel “Motherhood, Labor, and Agency Competitive Papers” at the National Communication Association’s Annual Convention held Nov. 10-13, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pa.

  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi was invited to present as a finalist in the Innovations in Teaching Competition at the Society of Marketing Advances conference held in Atlanta, Ga. on Nov. 2-5, 2016. Her talk was titled “Design and Deliver: Marketing Entrepreneurship.”

  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Philosophy Linda Cox presented on “Ethical Approaches to Women’s Incarceration” at an Austin Community College Philosophy Forum on Nov. 2, 2016.

  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 was a guest soloist in Living Paper Song Project’s “I, Too: The Voices of Langston Hughes.” She performed alongside three-time Grammy award-winning baritone Donnie Ray Albert, soprano Anitra Coulter Blunt, baritone/artistic director Tim O’Brien, and pianist Chien-Lin Lu. The music was paired with original stories, poems, and insights by poet and Langston Hughes scholar Philip Bryant as well as recordings of Hughes reading his own poems. The entire performance took place against the backdrop of a projected visual program comprising Hughes’ original manuscripts, typescripts, and photographs, as well as the art of Harlem Renaissance artists Archibald Motley and Aaron Douglas.

  • Professor of Spanish Laura Senio Blair presented the paper “From Pain to Pleasure: Sexual Awakenings and Revival in Contemporary Chilean Narrative” at the Mid-America Conference on Hispanic Literatures at the University of Kansas on Nov. 4, 2016. Earlier this semester, she attended the ACS workshop “Building Digital Foundations at Liberal Arts Colleges” at Centre College.

  • Professors of Biology Maria Todd and Maria Cuevas received a $15,000 grant from the Joe and Jessie Crump Foundation for Medical Research. The funds will support their research aimed at elucidating the role of tight junction destabilization in the development and progression of endometrial cancer. This project will offer research opportunities for undergraduate students majoring in Biology.

  • Mellon Fellow in Digital Scholarship Andrew Rechnitz delivered a presentation at the 2016 EDUCAUSE Annual Conference in Anaheim, Calif. on “Cup of Gold: Designing and Developing a Virtual Reality Learning Space” on Oct. 28, 2016. Cup of Gold introduces incoming students to the scale of academic libraries and teaches them basic research and information literacy skills.

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari has just been selected as a semi-finalist in the community orchestra conducting division of The American Prize national competition.

  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Howe lead a series of lecture presentations at the Vesuvian Institute in Castellammare di Stabia on the occasion of the visit of the Undersecretary of the Ministero dei Beni e le Attivita’ di Turismo (Cultural Ministry) of the Republic of Italy, Antimo Cesaro, on Oct. 28, 2016. The lectures summed up ten years of work by the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation on the site of the ancient Roman Villas of Stabiae in the fields of archaeology, education and cultural properties management. Howe is the scientific director and master planner for the site and the Foundation.  

  • Professor of Art and Art History Thomas Howe was invited to lead “La Villa di Arianna a Stabia: nuove conoscenze,” a session of lectures on recent work by members of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation, which he directs, at the site of Stabiae on Oct. 27, 2016. The session was part of the conference series Incontri con Archeologia (Encounters with Archaeology), at the Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Pompei, University of Maryland, Cornell University, State Hermitage Museum (St. Petersburg) and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics John Ross gave an invited talk at Baylor University on Oct. 27, 2016. The talk, “Stability Analysis and Curvature Estimates for Hypersurfaces in Euclidean and Gaussian Space,” was part of Baylor’s Mathematics Colloquium.

  • Professor of English David Gaines was featured in a CNBC News article, “‘Arrogant’ Bob Dylan angers Nobel authorities as he goes to ground over literature prize,” on Oct. 24, 2016. On Oct. 25, representatives of SVT Kultur & Samhalte (Swedish National Television) visited Georgetown to film Gaines for their annual documentary film regarding the Nobel Prize for Literature. Two days later, he was interviewed by and quoted on BBC Radio about more matters related to Dylan’s work and life.

  • Southwestern Outreach and Information Literacy Librarian Theresa Zelasko co-presented a session at the Internet Librarian 2016 conference in Monterey, Calif. on Oct. 16-19, 2016 titled “Social Media Hacks for the Busy Librarian.”

October 2016

  • Assistant Professor of Business Hazel Nguyen attended the Financial Management Association 2016 Annual Meeting in Las Vegas, Nev. from Oct. 19–22, 2016. She chaired a session on Stock Market Liquidity and discussed a paper titled “Liquidity on Exchange Traded Funds.”

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor was interviewed for a story in the Austin American-Statesman about the lack of competitive congressional races in Texas. The story was published on the front page of the Oct. 19th edition.

  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony presented a paper titled “A First Year Seminar’s Impact on Interest in Computer Science” at the 25th Annual Rocky Mountain Conference of the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges in Denver, Colo., held Oct. 14–15, 2016. Her paper will be published in the December 2016 issue of the Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges.

  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar co-authored a book chapter titled “The Wicked Stepmother Online: Maternal Identity and Personal Narrative in Social Media” in the book Taking the Village Online: Mothers, Motherhood, and Social Media.

  • Professor of Art History Thomas Howe gave an invited lecture “A Most Fragile Art Object: Interpreting and Presenting the Strolling Garden of the Villa Arianna, Stabia” at the 7th international research conference “Actual Problems of Theory and History of Art” conference, Актуальные проблемы теории и истории искусства, at the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia on Oct. 13, 2016. The conference is sponsored by Saint Petersburg State University, Lomonosov Moscow State University, and State Hermitage Museum.

  • Associate Professor of Spanish Angeles Rodriguez Cadena will be the keynote speaker for the opening of the seminar “Audiovisual Representations of the Past: The Construction of Historical Narrative and Identity through Cinema and Television” in Mexico and Ibero-America on March 24, 2017. The seminar is hosted by the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana in Mexico City, Mexico and sponsored by the International Association for Media and History (IAMHIST).

  • Professor of English David Gaines was featured on national and international media channels on Oct. 13. As a Bob Dylan expert, Al Jazerra News and ABC Radio News interviewed Gaines about his thoughts on Dylan’s Nobel Prize for literature. Iowa National Public Radio and the “San Antonio Express” also interviewed him the following day. Gaines wrote In Dylan Town: A Fan’s Life (University of Iowa Press, 2015) and speculated therein about Dylan eventually winning the Nobel Prize.

  • Associate Professor of Education Alicia L. Moore presented a teacher workshop to public school teachers and university historians at the Association for the Study of African American Life History (ASALH) 101st Annual National Conference in Richmond, Va. Moore continues to serve as Co-Project Manager for the Teacher Workshop. The mission of ASALH is to promote, research, preserve, interpret and disseminate information about African American life, history, and culture to the global community. Moore also served on two ASALH academic panels, Hallowed Grounds: Sites of African American Memory, and Activism and Mothering in the Age of Activism.

  • Associate Professor of Communications Studies Valerie Renegar received the 2016 Feminist Teacher Mentor award by the Organization for the Study of Communication, Language and Gender at their annual conference in Chicago, Ill.

  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi presented her co-authored project (with colleagues from Montclair State University and Trinity College Dublin) titled “Big Data: Diving In or Drowning Beneath? Perspectives and Insights from Marketing Managers” at the Direct/Interactive Marketing Research Summit in Los Angeles, Calif. held October 15-16, 2016.

  • Professor of Theatre Paul Gaffney directed a production of Noel Coward’s Blithe Spirit at the Unity Theatre in Brenham, Texas. Employing professional directors, actors and designers, primarily from the Houston area, the Unity Theatre is now in its 30th year of operation. In this production, recent theatre graduate Ally Oliphint ’16 made her professional acting debut in the role of Edith.

  • Part-time instructor of Applied Music Katherine Altobello ’99 was a guest vocalist for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur services at Congregation Beth Israel in Austin, Texas.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel took part in a visiting artist lecture series hosted by the School of Art at Louisiana State University Sept. 29-30, 2016. He presented a lecture concerning his artwork titled “Craft, Intimacy and Queer Theory,” and met with graduate students in the School of Art for Individual Critics.

  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti was invited to review two books related to her recently published book, Adorno and Democracy: The American Years. She reviewed Robyn Marasco’s The Highway of Despair: Critical Theory after Hegel, which will be published in the Cambridge Review of International Affairs. She also reviewed Gary A. Mullen’s Adorno on Politics after Auschwitz, which will be published in Symposium: a Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy.

  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer had a short essay published in the new issue of South Atlantic Quarterly. Her piece, “Other People’s Shit (and Pee!),” is part of a collection of essays edited by Kathi Weeks on “The Politics of the Public Toilet.”

  • Professor of Economics Emily Northrop presented “Fossil Fuel: Burn MORE or Burn LESS?” on how introductory economics instructors can pose pertinent economic and ethical questions raised by climate change. The presentation was on Sept. 30, 2016 at the EconED Conference sponsored by Macmillan Publishing and held in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi was named a national finalist for the 2016 American Prize Art Song Division (Professional Category). Southwestern alumna Kelsey Debner ’16 was selected as a national finalist for the 2016 American Prize Opera/Operetta Division (University Category).

  • Professor of Religion Laura Hobgood will present a lecture at Harvard University on Oct. 16, 2016. The invited lecture is part of the conference “Religion, Ecology and our Planetary Future.” Her talk is entitled “Critical Animal Studies Meets Religion and Ecology.”

  • Professor of Art and Herman Brown Chair Mary Visser will present “What Things May Come in 3D Printing for the Fine Arts, and Sciences” for the  “Fête de la Science 2016 : les modèles numériques dans l’art et la nature” in Verdun, France. Her artwork is being shown in the International 3D Printed Sculpture exhibition, also in Verdun. Additionally, Visser’s artwork was selected for the following art exhibitions: “3D Glitch at Ny Space” in Manchester, England from Nov. 28–Dec. 13, 2015, and “Virtually SOLID: Digital Fabrication as Sculpture” at Florida State College in Jacksonville, Fla. from Jan. 6–28, 2016.

  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer gave an invited lecture at St. Edward’s University in Austin on Sept. 26, 2016. Her talk, “Seeing Animals, Seeing Crips: Crip Reflections on the Work of Sunaura Taylor,” explores potential points of connection between disability studies and critical animal studies.  

  • Southwestern alumna Bianca Perez ’16 published her undergraduate research titled “First record of the Japanese Mystery Snail Cipangopaludina japonica (von Martins, 1861) in Texas” in the online, open-access journal Checklist. This work represented the first state record of this non-native mollusk and the first molecular ecology contribution from Professor of Biology Romi Burks’ lab. Alumna Averi Segrest ’16 and current student Sofia Campos, Class of 2017, co-authored the manuscript by contributing to the field work and molecular identification, respectively. Funds from the HHMI Inquiry Initiation and the Keck Foundation grant for molecular biology made the work possible.

  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal designed stage scenery for Jarrott Productions, the newest non-profit, professional theatre company in Austin, TX. The Price, by Arthur Miller, is now playing through Oct. 22 at 901 Trinity Street Theatre. The design explored the themes of regret/failure/success/dignity all revealed through interpersonal/intergenerational family dynamics of the early 20th century. Austin Mueck, Class of 2018, was scene design assistant and assisted Roybal with stage properties and technical organization. Roybal’s stage design was a collaboration with freelance stage director Mary (Fritz) Ketchum, freelance lighting designer Rachel Atkinson, St. Edward’s University costume designer Susan Branch Towne, and freelance sound designer Craig Brock.

  • Assistant Dean for Student Multicultural Affairs Terri Johnson has been asked to be a Conference Program Reviewer for the 2017 NASPA (National Student Affairs Professionals in Higher Education) Conference held March 11-15, 2017 in San Antonio, TX.

  • Professor of Art Mary Visser has been invited to give a presentation for the “Fête de la Science 2016 : les modèles numériques dans l’art et la nature” sponsored by the French Government to be held in Verdun, France Oct. 8-16. Visser will present “What Things May Come” and highlight the 37th Brown Symposium at Southwestern held in 2015. Her artwork will also be featured in an international exhibition of 3D printed sculpture.

  • Professor of Art History Kimberly Smith presented a paper titled “Becoming Human / Becoming Animal: Franz Marc and the Evolution of Perception” at the German Studies Association Annual Conference in San Diego on Oct. 1.

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari celebrated her 15th consecutive appointment as Music Director of the Austin Civic Orchestra (ACO) by opening the orchestra’s 40th season with a concert of classics, “The Three Bs.” The ACO performed Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms at the AISD Performing Arts Center on Sept. 25th. Seven ACO members are either current SU students or SU alums, including the orchestra’s assistant conductor Gus Sterneman ’06.

  • President Edward Burger was highlighted on KVUE (the Austin ABC-TV affiliate) in September. He also delivered the keynote address on Sept. 28 at the Forum for Excellence, an Illinois state-wide conference held at Illinois State University. He spoke on teaching the life-long practices of thinking, creating, and connecting as an intentional part of an impactful learning experience.

  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes gave the keynote address at the annual luncheon for the Seeds of Strength giving circle in Georgetown. She shared experiences, ideas, and open questions that came out of her First-Year Seminar, “Doing Good and Doing It Well.”

  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo presented a paper titled “Spiritual Activist Pedagogies and Methodologies: Oral History as Recovery, Healing, and Resistance” at the Mujeres Activas En Letras Y Cambio Social (MALCS) Conference in Laramie, Wyoming on Aug. 6, 2016. Sendejo also presented her work with students in the Latina History Project at the National Chicana Studies Conference April 6–9, 2016 in Denver, Colo.

  • Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo and alumna Tori Vasquez ’15 co-authored an article titled “‘Unboxing the Buried Seeds of My Belonging’: Latina/o History, Decolonized Pedagogies and the Politics of Inclusion” for the American Anthropological Association’s Anthropology News Column. The article is about their work on the Latina History Project at Southwestern. Project contributors include current students Stephanie Garcia, Class of 2018, Denise Ovalle, Class of 2017, alumna Adriana Romero ’16, and project co-director Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer.

September 2016

  • Professor of Biology Maria Todd and her co-authors, Dr. Thomas Langan and Dr. Robert Sclafani (both of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center), published an article in The Journal of Cancer titled “Doxycycline-Regulated p16MTS1 Expression Suppresses the Anchorage-Independence and Tumorigenicity of Breast Cancer Cell Lines that Lack Endogenous p16.” Their study demonstrated the mechanisms by which the p16 gene is inactivated in breast cancer and how replacement of the functional gene results in the suppression of breast tumor growth.

  • Professor of Art History Thomas Howe, Professor of Classics Hal Haskell and Instructor of Environmental Studies Anwar Sounny-Slitine participated in a seminar/workshop on adapting GIS technology for teaching and research Aug. 8-9, 2016 at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. The workshop was funded by a joint grant from the Associated Colleges of the South.

  • Professor of Art History Thomas Howe has multiple works previously presented at conferences appearing in publication:

    • “Creating a New Image of Antiquity in the 21st Century: The Archaeological Park at Stabiae near Pompeii,” presented at the conference Actual Problems of Theory and History of Art (Oct. 28 – Nov.1, 2014, St. Petersburg State University and The State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia), will be published in February in the Acts of the conference.
    • “Defining an Archaeological Park: The Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation Master Plan 2001 and Work Since 2007” was published in 2015 in Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Contemporary Problems of Architecture and Construction.The conference was held Nov. 19-21, 2015 in Florence, Italy.
    • “Stabiae: A Draught Sustainability Master Plan after the Model of Aerospace,” an invited lecture given in Italian at the conference Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, XXXIII Giornata dell’Ambiente: Resilienza delle città d’arte ai terremoti/Enhancing the Resilience of Historic Sites to Earthquakes (Nov. 3-4, 2015, The Lincei in Roma, Italy), will be published in September 2016 in the Acts of the conference. 
  • Professor of Art History Thomas Howe published an invitational book chapter titled “The Arrival of the Greek Monumental Orders and the Auto-didact Polymath Architect” in Festschrift for Manolis Korres, on the occasion of the retirement of the Parthenon Restoration architect. Howe also presented a peer-reviewed/invited paper titled “Strolling with Power: New Studies on Movement and Viewing from the Elite Roman Villas of Stabiae” at the conference, Fonte Aretusa: Second Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Hellenic Heritage of Southern Italy in Syracuse, Sicily, May 30-June 2, 2016. A version of the lecture was also presented at the Hong Kong Club in Hong Kong, China, on Sept. 3, 2016. This lecture will also be presented at the Art History Working Papers/“Representations” lecture at Southwestern on Sept. 21, 2016. Additionally, Howe conducted the tenth field season of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation on the site of the Roman villas of Stabiae in June and July of 2016. Southwestern students Chris Hernandez, Class of 2019, Sophia Anthony, Class of 2018, and Brenda Sanchez, Class of 2019, participated in the architectural field team with partial support from the Southwestern competitive faculty development fund.

  • Sports Information Director Megan Hardin was named the Vice-Chair of the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) Goodwill & Wellness Committee.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Ron Geibel will have his installation “Strike” featured in the exhibition CraftTexas at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft. The exhibition runs from Sept. 23, 2016 to Jan. 8, 2017.

  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger published an article in Palgrave Communications, as part of a special issue marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. The article, “‘Do not call them bastards’: Shakespeare as an invasive species,” draws from the work of Banu Subramaniam, who was the keynote speaker at the 2016 ACS Gender conference, of which Saenger was co-coordinator. Saenger also published a review of a cross-dressed performance of Merry Wives of Windsor on the website, Reviewing Shakespeare.

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented guidelines, examples, and curricular recommendations on integrating STEM and German at the annual meeting of the Texas Chapter of the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) in San Marcos, TX, on Sept.10, 2016. High school, college, and university teachers collaborated on coordinating curricular decisions and pedagogies to advance student learning outcomes. Berroth built her work from a 3-week curriculum development workshop she completed in Leipzig, Germany, sponsored by the German government and AATG.

  • Dean of Enrollment Services Christine Bowman will serve as the new Board Chair for Colleges That Change Lives. Her role will begin in 2017.

  • Professor of Theatre Paul Gaffney presented a lecture on Henrik Ibsen’s verse play Peer Gynt for the annual Georgetown Festival of the Arts on June 3, 2016, discussing its place as a source for Edvard Grieg’s beloved “Peer Gynt Suite.” He also performed the role of The Narrator in a festival performance of Lars-Erik Larsson’s lyric suite, “A God Disguised.”

  • Multiple Southwestern students, faculty and alumni presented papers at the August 2016 American Sociological Association (ASA) annual meeting in Seattle, Wash.

    • Kelly McKeon, Class of 2017, presented a research paper titled “Finding a Deficit in the Deficit Model: A Study of the Social and Academic Integration of First-Generation College Students.”
    • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron and Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe presented a paper titled “The Paradox of Colorblindness: Undergraduate Students’ Selective Perceptions about Race and Racial Diversity.” Nathan Tuttle ’14 and Brianna Billingsley ’14 are co-authors on the paper. Byron also served on the ASA Honors Program Advisory Council and Lowe served on the 2016 Outstanding Graduate Student Paper Award Committee for the ASA Race, Gender, and Class section.
    • Guillermo Alvarado ’15 presented a paper titled “‘That Gay Gangsta Shit’: Identity Construction and Community Membership in Queer Rappers’ Musical Careers.” Alvarado’s paper also received first place in the 2016 national Alpha Kappa Delta (AKD) undergraduate paper competition. For his achievement, Guillermo was honored at the AKD Distinguished Lecture.
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor presented a paper titled “Signaling Incivility: The Role of Speaker, Substance and Tone” at the Political Communication Pre-conference to the American Political Science Association (APSA) Annual Meeting on August 31 in Philadelphia, Penn. Grace Atkins, Class of 2017, is a co-author on the project. Her analysis was included at the conference.

August 2016

  • Director of Spiritual and Religious Life and Chaplain Megan Danner ’06 recently had a sermon included in the newly published book The Term: A Word for the Campus by the Campus. The book is a collection of resources for campus ministers and chaplains, and will be distributed widely across the country to campuses of many traditions and affiliations. This is Danner’s first published work.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus and her bilingual daughter, Sabrina Mateus, were recently interviewed by Telemundo-Austin to provide tips about what it has been like to raise bilingual children in Austin, and in Sabrina’s case, why she loves being able to use Spanish in her community.

  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower presented a paper titled “Utopia’s Empire: Thomas More, his Readers, and the Development of British Imperialism in the Tudor Century” before the Sixteenth Century Studies Conference in Bruges, Belgium, on Aug. 19, 2016. The paper was part of a special panel convened to mark the 500th anniversary of the publication of More’s Utopia (1516).

  • Part-time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis toured Texas and California with flute/harp duo Chaski for its “Oceans of Space” program in July. The concerts featured ocean-themed music and raised funds for ocean conservation. Chaski performed its own commission, Brandon Nelson’s “Manannán mac Lir” and Inglis’ “A Noiseless Patient Spider,” along with classical, Sephardic, Celtic, and Latin American folk music.

  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti published her book Adorno and Democracy: The American Years (University Press of Kentucky, 2016).

  • Associate Professor of Theatre Kerry Bechtel presented on a panel entitled “Laboring in the Dark: Invisibility and Insufficiency in Academic Theatre” at the Association of Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE) conference held this August in Chicago, Ill.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science John Ross and Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science Therese Shelton participated in an ACS workshop, “Mathematics and Social Justice,” May 21-22, 2016 at Rollins College. They also created course modules that will be implemented this academic year.

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science Therese Shelton published an article “Injecting Inquiry‐Oriented Modules into Calculus” in the journal PRIMUS. The article is based on HHMI-supported work.

  • Associate Professor of Spanish Carlos de Oro and Iris Klotz ’15 co-authored an article titled “Cine, pobreza y marginación en el Pacífico colombiano” in the journal Imagofagia, Revista de la Asociación Argentina de Estudios de Cine y Audiovisual. This article was the result of research that started during the 2015 Spanish Capstone. Klotz also presented a paper about this topic in the 2015 Undergraduate Research Symposium.

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin published an article “Queering Uncle Sam, the Caribbean, and the Academy: A Humanifesto for Us All” in Millennium: Journal of International Studies. The article was inspired and influenced in part by the excellent work of Southwestern alumna Dr. Meghana Nayak ’97 of Pace University.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi was selected as a national semi-finalist in the 2016 American Prize competition (Art Song Division). Details can be found here.

  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky was one of six international scholars invited by the Pre-Columbian Society of Washington, D.C., to present current research at their 23rd Annual Symposium, themed “Divine Kingship: The Political Ideology of Pre-Columbian Rulers,” on Sept. 17. His paper, “The Fifth Sun Also Rises: Hieroglyphs and Narratives in Aztec Tenochtitlan,” will explore the development of sacred iconography within changing environmental and political conditions under Moteuczoma.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of English and Writer-in-Residence John Pipkin’s forthcoming novel, The Blind Astronomer’s Daughter, received an early, starred review from Library Journal. Pipkin’s official book launch and reception will be held at the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin on October 18. A BookPeople reading and signing has also been scheduled for October 24. A full list of tour dates, press releases, and information about the novel can be found at www.johnpipkin.com.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Education Suzanne García-Mateus co-authored a Huffington Post article titled “Save CA Residents from a Language Drought: Vote ‘Yes’ This Fall,” which promotes California’s Proposition 58-LEARN (Language Education, Acquisition and Readiness Now). If passed, the proposition will repeal the ban on bilingual education that began in 1998, and provide a multilingual education for all students.

  • Five Southwestern faculty and two students participated in MathFest, a national meeting of the Mathematical Association of America, Aug. 3–6, 2016.

    • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura co-presented a MiniCourse, “Visualizing Projective Geometry through Photographs and Perspective Drawings”, with Dr. Annalisa Crannell, Franklin & Marshall College and Dr. Marc Frantz, Indiana University.

    • Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science John Ross served as a judge for a Student Paper Session.

    • Associate Professors of Mathematics Therese Shelton co-presented a MiniCourse, “Teaching Modeling First Differential Equations-Building Community in SIMIODE” with Brian Winkel, United States Military Academy; Patrice Tiffany, Manhattan College; and Rosemary Farley, Manhattan College. Shelton attended the Invited Paper Session in Mathematical Biology with support from the Southwestern Keck Foundation Grant.

    • Morgan Engle and Penny Phan, both Class of 2018, presented “Green Math: Models of Greenhouse Gasses” under the SU HHMI SCOPE program, supervised by Shelton.

    • Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science Gary Richter, Associate Professors of Mathematics Alison Marr, and Victoria Gore, Class of 2018, also attended MathFest.
  • Four Southwestern faculty attended mathematical conferences during the first week of August 2016 in Columbus, Ohio.

    • Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science John Ross co-organized multiple sessions for Project NExT.
    • Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science Gary Richter and Associate Professors of Mathematics Alison Marr and Therese Shelton were invited to participate in “Active Learning in Mathematics Instruction Symposium: Use and Assessment” from Aug. 2–3 through the Educational Advancement Foundation, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Sloan Foundation.

    • On August 4, Marr also co-organized “Expanding IBL Throughout Higher Ed”, an extension of the Legacy of R. L. Moore Conference on Inquiry-Based Learning. Richter presented a poster titled “Numbers and Algebra: Axioms and theorems for the Novice Mathematician” and Ross presented a poster titled “Experiences Using Group Proof-Writing and LaTeX in an IBL Topology Class” at the conference.
  • Professor of Spanish Laura Senio Blair attended the book release party at the Universidad de Chile Instituto de la Comunicación e Imagen for the book Nomadías: El cine de Marilú Mallet, Valeria Sarmiento y Angelina Vázquez on July 27, 2016. Blair contributed a chapter titled “Atravesando continentes y océanos: La obra fílmica de Angelina Vázquez.”

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower delivered a Brown Bag lunch talk titled “Pay Equity, Public Workers, and the Transformation of the American Labor Movement, 1972–1985” at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

  • Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long participated in a panel titled “Where are the Lines? Coexistence of Environmental Causes in a Conservative Texas” on July 14, 2016. The panel was sponsored by Earth Day ATX. Long was also featured in a Q&A interview with journalist Cody McCrary in the August edition of Community Impact (Georgetown).

  • Professor of Art and Herman Brown Chair Mary Visser was invited to deliver the keynote address at the 27th International Solid Freeform Fabrication Association Symposium on August 8th, 2016 at the University of Texas at Austin. The title of her presentation was “Cybersculpture and Its Pioneers.” Visser also created artwork that has been selected for the 3D Glitch exhibition taking place Sept. 7—Nov. 12, 2016 at the Arts Centre Washington in Sunderland, United Kingdom. This exhibition looks at imperfection in the digital world, in an age when “photoshopped perfection” is all too common. Lastly, Visser is featured in a Materialise.com blog titled “Meet Mary Visser: Artist, Academic and Feminist 3D Designer.” The blog focuses on Visser being one of the first to pioneer the use of 3D Printing in art and sculpture.

  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks co-authored a paper about developing oral communication skills in undergraduates in the July 2016 issue of The Journal of College Science Teaching with colleagues from the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation at the American Museum of Natural History and additional faculty from participating institutions. The paper titled “Think Before (and After) You Speak: Practice and Self-Reflection Bolster Oral Communication Skills” includes data collected from two years of student presentations and assessments conducted as part of a first year biology course in Biodiversity. The study revealed that self-reflection on the part of the student and intentionality on the part of the professor boosts skill acquisition and performance without loss of content. Such gains can readily occur within a semester when students get the opportunity to practice oral communication skills, much like revising written essays.

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr published an article titled “Coprime and prime labelings of graphs” in The Journal of Integer Sequences. This article was the result of work that started at the summer 2012 workshop, Research Experiences for Undergraduate Faculty.

  • Professor of Music Kenny Sheppard was awarded the Texas Choral Directors Association’s top honor at their July 2016 meeting attended by over 1,500 choral conductors. The Texas Choirmaster Award is “reserved for a TCDA member with clearly superior choral conducting and musicianship skill with many years of performance success.” 

  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower received a John Fell Research Fund Grant from Oxford University to present a paper entitled “Auld Enemies and Auld Empires: Scotland, England, and Early Modern British Imperialism” at a special two-day conference on “Imperial Comparison” at All Soul’s College, Oxford University, in Oxford, United Kingdom on July 8–9, 2016.

  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower attended the British Scholar Society’s Britain and the World Annual Conference at King’s College in London, United Kingdom, on June 22–24, 2016 where she presented the paper titled “A Whig in Wolf’s Clothing: Pop Culture, Historical Fiction, and British History from Geoffrey of Monmouth to Hilary Mantel.” The paper was part of the the conference’s very first pedagogy panel, and combined theory, teaching, and scholarly research.

July 2016

  • Vice President for Finance and Administration Craig Erwin participated in a panel with executive-level administrators at the EDUCAUSE Leadership Institute Conference, held at the AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center in Austin on July 18–22. The panel centered on helping program participants learn more about their goals, responsibilities and biggest challenges related to higher education administration.

  • Professor Emeritus of Sociology Edward L. Kain’s article “Does the Center Hold? Reflections on a Sociological Core” was published in the July 2016 issue of Teaching Sociology.

  • Assistant Professor of Economics Patrick Van Horn presented the paper “Bank Liquidity and Leverage: Trends and Cycles of New York State Banks During the National Banking Era” at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) Summer Institute in Cambridge, Mass. on July 11–29.

  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger published a review in Reviewing Shakespeare of The City Theater’s production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, directed by Southwestern alumna Lindsay McKenna ’06.

    Saenger also published a review of a new book, The Elizabethan Top Ten: Defining Print Popularity in Early Modern England, in Notes and Queries (Oxford University Press).

  • Professor of Classics Hal Haskell’s article “Central Crete’s Octopus Trademark” was published through the University of Crete (Rethymnon, Greece) in June. In this article, Haskell demonstrates that certain olive oil transport vessels imported to Cyprus (ca. 1400-1200 BCE) bore a decorative motif - the octopus - that indicated to Cypriot consumers not only “originated in Crete,” but also more specifically Central Crete. Central Cretan origins have been verified by Haskell through vase shape studies and by his colleagues at Glasgow University and Sheffield University through chemical and petrographic analyses. The publication is the written version of a paper delivered at a conference in Rethymnon in 2013.

  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa has been selected as one of four national semi-finalists in the 2016 American Prize Lorin Hollander Piano Concerto contest. The American Prize is a national competition that gives awards in various performing categories based on recordings submitted by individuals or ensembles.

  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer was invited to deliver a plenary lecture at the Decolonizing Critical Animal Studies, Cripping Critical Animal Studies Conference at the University of Alberta on June 21-23. Her talk, “Seeing Animals: Crip Reflections on the Work of Sunaura Taylor,” prefaced the opening of a show of Sunaura Taylor’s work at the FemLab Gallery on the University of Alberta campus.

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari hosted the 2016 SU Conductors’ Institute from Jun. 23 - 25. Associate clinician for the workshop was Peter Bay, Music Director of the Austin Symphony. Bay and Ferrari coached ten participating conductors, including recent alum Mattie Kotzur ’16, in Igor Stravinsky’s Octet and L’histoire du soldat. Performers included the following part-time faculty: Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis, Instructor of Applied Music Daniel Chrisman, Assistant Professor of Applied Music Jessica Gilliam-Valls, and Assistant Professor of Applied Music Kyle Koronka. Sir David Whitwell gave a lecture on score memorization. The Institute concluded with a public concert presentation in which all ten participants conducted movements from these two chamber works.

  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper presented a paper titled “Felix Mendelssohn’s English Countenance as Reflected in London Publications of His Vocal Chamber Music to Ca. 1850” on July 9 at the symposium Germanic Enthusiasms, Anglo-Saxon Attitudes: Conflict, Transfer and Assimilation in London’s Musical Life, c.1800–1850. The symposium was sponsored by the European Research Commission and hosted by King’s College, London.

  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron accepted a special invitation to present an overview of his employment discrimination research to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (E.E.O.C.) in Washington, D.C. from June 15-17. The title of his presentation was “Quantitative and Qualitative Analyses of Employment Discrimination Charge Data.” As a result of the conference, he has been invited to serve in a future position on the editorial board for the quarterly sociological magazine Contexts, a publication of the American Sociological Association.

June 2016

  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal recently designed scenery and stage properties for Penfold Theatre Company for the play Clybourne Park. The design and the acting were both credited as reasons for the play’s critically-acclaimed success. Southwestern Technical Director Justin Smith ’04 served as Technical Director for the play. His expertise and knowledge of scenic construction, rigging and installation were also important to the play’s achievements.

    Southwestern students were also involved with this production. Austin Mueck ’18 served as scenic design assistant; Noah Kopit ’16, Brock Boudoin ’16, Brenna Nelson ’16, Christian Aderholt ’19, Kolton Noreen ’18 all served as stage carpenters and load-in crew.

  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Applied Music Jessica Valls is organizing the 2nd annual Austin Bass Workshop at the Sarofim School of Fine Arts, June 27–30. Bassists from all over the country including New Mexico, New York, Nebraska, Kansas, and Texas are converging on Southwestern for a four-day event of masterclasses, public concerts, technique classes and bass orchestra. All ages, all levels and all styles are participating in the music activities.

  • Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts and Professor of Music Michael Cooper conducted a workshop at the University of North Texas on the source-critical editing of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century music.

  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis toured five counties in rural Texas with flute/harp ensemble Chaski in May 2016. This tour was made possible by a rural outreach grant provided by the Texas Commission on the Arts. Chaski presented six performances of the program “Exploring the Folk Music of Latin America” to audiences in Lampasas, Eastland, Mills, Brown, and San Saba counties.

  • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe has been invited to join the Editorial Board of the Journal of Undergraduate Ethnography. She has also been invited to serve on the Southern Sociological Society program committee for its 2017 conference.

  • Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore was the invited keynote speaker at Georgetown’s 64th annual Juneteenth Celebration on June 18. The Celebration was hosted by the Georgetown Cultural Citizen Memorial Association. Juneteenth celebrates June 19, 1865 when Union soldiers landed at Galveston, delivering the news that the Civil War was over and that slavery had ended.

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari led the Austin Civic Orchestra in a performance of Hector Belioz’s “Symphonie Fantastique” on May 24 at the Austin ISD Performing Arts Center. The guest artist for the concert was saxophonist Harvey Pittel who performed the “Ibert Concertino.” This was the final formal program of the ACO’s eight-concert season, in which Dr. Ferrari is finishing her 14th consecutively-appointed season as Music Director.

  • Associate Professor of Spanish Angeles Rodriguez Cadena edited a new book titled La ficción histórica en la televisión iberoamericana 2000–2012, and contributed the chapter “Memoria cultural y la construccion audiovisual del pasado.” The book focuses on historical fiction in television.

  • Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Mike Gesinski was awarded a grant from the Petroleum Research Fund and the American Chemical Society entitled “Development of a Novel and Versatile Method for the Synthesis of Substituted Cyclobutanes.” This grant will provide $55,000 over two years to support an undergraduate research program in organic chemistry at Southwestern.

  • Director of Special Collections and Archives Jason W. Dean chaired a panel titled “The View from the Director’s Desk: Managing Soft Skills in Special Collections” at the annual Rare Books and Manuscripts Section conference in Coral Gables, Fla.

  • Head Football Coach Joe Austin and Assistant Coach Tom Ross will be traveling to Mexico at the end of June to conduct an intensive four day clinic for football coaches at CETYS University in the CONADEP football conference.

  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller chaired a panel and presented the paper, “Jade Suits and Royal Power: Illuminating Artistic Production in the Regional Centers of the Western Han,” at the Seventh Worldwide Conference of the Society for East Asian Archaeology, held at Harvard University and Boston University on June 10th.

  • Professor of Biology Max Taub and Joshua Page ’15 co-authored an article in the journal Frontiers in Psychology titled “Molecular Signatures of Natural Selection for Polymorphic Genes of the Human Dopaminergic and Serotonergic Systems: A Review.”

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science John Ross presented an exhibit titled “Geometric Bubble Surfaces” at the Thinkery’s Strength in Numbers event. The presentation encouraged the audience to engage with mathematics through soap films. Southwestern alumni Christi Ho ’16, Robert Lehr ’15, and Julia Sykora ’16 also presented. Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura was a consultant for the event.

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers contributed a post titled “Re-Visioning Rich” to Ms. Magazine Blog.

  • Assistant Dean for Student Multicultural Affairs Terri Johnson was recognized by the University of Oklahoma’s College of Continuing Education and University Outreach for her dedicated service and contribution as a member of the National Advisory Council to NCORE. She received the award on May 31 at the National Conference of Race and Ethnicity in San Francisco.

  • Women’s soccer coach Linda Hamilton traveled to Shanghai, China with the U.S. State Department Sports Envoy to host on-field training sessions, share her story, and empower Chinese women to take up the sport. Hamilton’s return to China marks the 25th anniversary of her 1991 Women’s World Cup victory with the U.S. Women’s National Team in Guangzhou.

  • Assistant Professor of Economics Patrick Van Horn published an article titled “Bank Leverage and Regulatory Regimes: Evidence from the Great Depression and Great Recession” in the American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings. This article was coauthored with Christoffer Koch and Gary Richardson.

  • Professor of Art History Thomas Howe presented a lecture titled “Strolling with Power: New Studies on Movement and Viewing from the Elite Roman Villas of Stabiae” at the Second Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Hellenic Heritage of Southern Italy with a special emphasis on “Politics and Performance in Western Greece.” The Symposium was held at the SCIE Center in the Palazzo Borgia in Siracusa, Sicily on Thursday, June 2, 2016. Howe is also the Scientific Director for Master Planning and Archaeology of the Stabiae Project.

May 2016

  • Associate Professor of Theatre Desiderio Roybal designed “Clybourne Park” for the professional theatre company, Penfold Theatre. The show is now playing at the Long Center in Austin, TX. This is the second play Roybal has designed for Penfold Theatre in the last year.

  • Master Electrician Patrick Anthony won the 2015–2016 Austin Critics’ Table Award for Lighting Design for his work in “Year of the Rooster,” “Hunger,” “Terminus,” “Medea,” and “Marie Antoinette.”

  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper published two chapters (in German) in Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: Interpretationen seiner Werke, ed. Matthias Geuting (Laaber: Laaber-Verlag, 2016). The first of these chapters is on Mendelssohn’s concert arias “Infelice! / Ah, ritorna, età dell’ oro (MWV H 4, 1834)” and “Infelice! / Ah, ritorna, bell’ età (MWV H 5, 1843).” The second is on Mendelssohn’s two settings for soloists, chorus, and orchestra of Goethe’s ballad “Die erste Walpurgisnacht (MWV D 3, 1830-43).”

  • Professor of English and Director of National Fellowships and Scholarships David Gaines addressed juniors and seniors at Roosevelt High School in San Antonio on May 24 — Bob Dylan’s 75th birthday. His topic, “Why Dylan and What Passions?,” concluded the week-long “Dylan Days” celebration, jointly sponsored by the San Antonio Public Library and the San Antonio Independent School District.

  • Assistant Dean for Student Multicultural Affairs Terri Johnson is attending the 2016 Pre-Conference Institutes for the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity (NCORE) May 31 in San Francisco, Calif. This pre‐conference institute explores how race has shaped the development of student affairs as a professional practice.

  • Professor of Biology Romi Burks attended the Society for Freshwater Science meeting in Sacramento, Calif. from May 21–25 where she gave an invited talk entitled “Worldly Science: Developing Undergraduate Research and Mentoring Activities to Train Diverse Global Scientists: An NSF-IRES Case Study.” The talk featured her international research program involving Southwestern students and host scientists from Uruguay. It took place in a special session focused on broadening participation of undergraduates in freshwater science.

  • Associate Professor of Spanish Katy Ross published an article titled “The Failed Quest-Romance: Lucía Etxebarria’s Nosotras que no somos como las demás” in Symposium: A Quarterly Journal in Modern Literatures Volume 70, Issue 2.

  • Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Josh Long published “Hipster Hate and the Sabotage of Real Social Commentary” on EndOfAustin.com.

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin has the lead article in a special issue of the The Journal of the International Association of Inter-American Studies titled “Spaces and Places of (Im)Possibility and Desire: Transversal Revolutionary Imaginaries in the Twentieth Century Americas.”

  • The Mundy Award For Exemplary Service was created in 2002 as a memorial to the leadership of former Southwestern alumnus and trustee, Joe Mundy. The award is given to faculty and staff who have demonstrated exemplary service to Southwestern. This year, three recipients were presented a Mundy Award: Director of Administrative Computing Jennifer O’Daniel, Athletic Equipment Manager Michael Torres, and Assistant Director of Student Activities & Residence Life Jason Chapman.

  • Assistant Professor of Music Hai Zheng-Olefsky released her sixth CD on the Amatius Classics label titled Remembrance. Featured on the CD is Associate Dean and Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa. Zheng-Olefsky and Tamagawa celebrate their 20th season of performing together this year.

  • Professor of English David Gaines presented Bob Dylan: Spiritually, Politically and Aesthetically Speaking to an audience gathered by Front Porch Parable at Scholz Garten in Austin on March 15, 2016. His remarks were accompanied by a Dylan set performed by musician Dave Madden. The set list, selected by Gaines, consisted of “Blowin’ in the Wind,” “Mr. Tambourine Man,” “Tangled Up in Blue,” “Forever Young,” and “Wigwam.”

  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones presented the paper titled A Revolution in Medical Training: The Making, Remaking, and Enduring of the National School of Homeopathic Medicine in Mexico, 1895–1936 at the annual meeting of the American Association for the History of Medicine in Minneapolis on April 30, 2016.

  • Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long served as an invited panelist at Earth Day Texas in Dallas titled “Georgetown Goes Green.” Long took nine students to this event where they presented their capstone research on sustainability at Southwestern University.

  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti was invited to present a talk on her forthcoming book, Adorno and Democracy: The American Years, at the annual meeting of the Association for Adorno Studies Conference at the Université de Montréal.

  • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe’s co-authored article, “Who Looks Suspicious? Racialized Surveillance in a Predominantly White Neighborhood,” has been accepted for publication in the sociology journal, Social Currents. This paper is co-authored with Angela Stroud ’03, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Social Justice at Northland College, and Alice Nguyen ’14. It served as the foundation for Professor Lowe’s Paideia Connections lecture.

  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger published a review of The Oxford Handbook of English Prose 1500–1640, ed. Andrew Hadfield in Notes and Queries. Saenger also published a review of a recent production of Richard III in Austin. The review can be seen in Reviewing Shakespeare, a website hosted by the University of Warwick and the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.

  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper presented a paper titled “Mendelssohn contra Mendelssohn: The Pre-1848 British Editions of Felix [and Fanny] Mendelssohn’s Songs, Duets, and Partsongs” at ML75.UNT, a symposium celebrating the 75th anniversary of the University of North Texas Music Library. Cooper’s paper begins with Felix Mendelssohn’s oft-discussed third private audience in 1842 with Queen Victoria and the Prince Consort Albert, and explores the proliferation of English translations and editions of his vocal chamber music in the 1840s. This exploration reveals the construction of a distinctively English Mendelssohnian song persona that was not only distinct from that in his native Germany, but also dominated—unwittingly, surprisingly, and perhaps tellingly—by the music of Felix’s sister, Fanny, rather than his own works.

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton had a paper titled “Injecting Inquiry-Oriented Modules into Calculus” accepted for publication for a special issue in the journal PRIMUS-Problems, Resources, and Issues in Mathematics Undergraduate Studies.

April 2016

  • Assistant Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo presented a paper titled ‘The Space in Between’: Exploring the Development of Chicana Feminist Thought in Central Texas at the National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies Conference in Denver on April 7. Dr. Sendejo was also on a panel that consisted of contributors to the forthcoming anthology, ¡Chicana! New Narratives of Chicana Activism and Feminism in the Chicano Movement.

  • Professor of Philosophy Phil Hopkins’ chapter …As He Says in His Poetical Way: Empedocles and Anaxagoras on the Motive Forces of the Kosmos will appear in a new Companion to Ancient Philosophy, edited by Sean Kirkland and Eric Sanday which is under contract at Northwestern University Press. The volume gathers essays from international scholars and focuses thematically on the concept of “companionship,” offering new continental interpretations of ancient Greek texts.

  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes presented a paper, The View From Below: What We Learn From Local Migrant Histories, at the Council for European Studies (CES) International Conference in Philadelphia. She also chaired the committee that granted this year’s CES/Mellon Dissertation Completion Fellowships.

  • President of Southwestern and Professor Edward Burger delivered an Invited Address at the national conference of the Commission On Adult Basic Education in Dallas and the Plenary Address at the Association of American Medical Colleges’ Annual Southern Conference in Austin. At both, he shared his vision for impactful learning through creativity and effective thinking.

  • Director of First Year Biology Laboratories Stacie Brown, in collaboration with Dr. Richard Meyer of University of Texas, has secured a contract with American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Press to co-write a lab manual for sophomore/junior level introductory microbiology students. The lab manual will include guided-inquiry and inquiry-based modules that conform to ASM curriculum recommendations. The expected publication date is 2017.

  • Professor of Music Kenny Sheppard conducted a master class for the choirs at Texas A&M, Kingsville on February 22.

  • Head men’s basketball coach Janson Hightower was named to the National Association of Basketball Coaches 30-Under-30 Team. The National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) presented its major awards for the 2015-16 men’s basketball season Sunday night at the annual AT&T NABC Guardians of the Game Awards Show. The event was held at the Cullen Theater at Wortham Center in Houston during the annual NABC Convention held in conjunction with the 2016 NCAA® Men’s Final Four ®. Hightower was selected to receive the award on behalf of all honorees at the event and made brief remarks during his acceptance speech.

  • Associate Dean of Multicultural Affairs Terri Johnson will facilitate a workshop for Kansas State University student leaders on April 13. She will also deliver a public talk, “This is for Real: What’s Going on With Diversity” on April 14. The talk will cover critical issues of advocacy for social, political and economic equality. She will integrate personal and professional practices of diversity to discuss intersectionality and microaggression realities encountered or sidestepped in work on diversity.

  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky has been selected as a 2016–17 Residential Scholar at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, for its annual theme, “Art and Anthropology.” His project titled Currencies of Wealth and Fame: The Social Lives of Luxury Objects in Aztec Mexico will consider the social lives of Aztec personal luxury adornments (from production to exchange, display, and final interment) in relation to Aztec cultural values and economies of human and material sacrifice.

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers gave an invited talk titled “People of the Books and the Movies” to Congregation Havurah Shalom in Georgetown.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Sydnor was awarded the Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award by the American Political Science Association’s Political Communication section for her dissertation, “Fighting Words and Fiery Tone: The Interaction of Political Incivility and Psychological Conflict Orientation.”

  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi was selected as the Marketing Strategy Research Track Chair for the 2016 Society of Marketing Advances Conference. Earlier this spring, she was one of 28 faculty members invited to the Marketing Edge Professor’s Institute. This conference brings together practice leaders and academic experts in digital marketing to engage in discussions about pressing issues in this domain and lays the groundwork for future empirical work.

  • Professor of Spanish Katy Ross presented a paper on the representation of motherhood in the 2010 film “Biutiful” at the Kentucky Foreign Language Conference in Lexington, Kentucky.

  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa performed Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier, Book I, at the Belmont University School of Music in Nashville on March 31. He performs Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 22 with the Temple Symphony Orchestra on April 30 and May 1.

  • The Board of Trustees approved the following recommendations regarding promotion of faculty:

    Associate Professors promoted to the rank of Professor:

    • Dr. David Gaines, Professor of English
    • Dr. Katy Ross, Professor of Spanish

    • Dr. Maria Todd, Professor of Biology
  • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe attended the annual American Sociological Association (ASA) meeting in Chicago, where she presented a paper co-authored with Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron titled “The Specter of Gendered Aggression: Predicting Students’ Level of Comfort at Weekend Campus Parties.” She was also a presider at two sessions and has agreed to serve on the graduate student paper award committee for the Race, Gender and Class section during the 2015–16 academic year.

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers published “My Trumped Up Jewish Fantasy, from A to Z” in Tablet, a daily online magazine of Jewish news, ideas and culture.

  • Associate Professor of Theatre Kerry Bechtel worked with both Unity Theatre in Brenham, Texas and Main Street Theatre in Houston, Texas this Spring. Kerry designed the costumes for a production of Unity Theatre’s The Miss Firecracker Contest in February and designed the costumes for Main Street’s TYA production of Harriet the Spy, which opens on April 12, 2016. Both productions were completed under professional contracts with United Scenic Artists, Local 829.

  • On April 1 and 2, Professor of English David Gaines attended the American Writing Programs Conference in Los Angeles, California. He represented the University of Iowa Press and discussed as well as signed copies of his book “In Dylan Town: A Fan’s Life.”

  • Associate Professor in Mathematics Gary Richter presented “Numbers and Algebra: Axioms and Theorems for the Novice Mathematician” at the Texas Section Meeting of the Mathematical Association of America at Stephen F. Austin State University on April 1, 2016. Associate Professor in Mathematics Therese Shelton co-presented “SIMIODE: A Modeling Approach to Differential Equations” with John Sieben and Reza Abbasian of Texas Lutheran University. Shelton is the current Chair of the Texas Section.

  • Associate Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde was a featured composer at the University of Southern Mississippi’s New Music Festival, in Hattiesburg, Miss., on April 8–9. His work, Hollow, for clarinet was performed.

  • Mathematics major Charles Payne, Class of 2016, won a Best Student Presentation Award at the Texas Section Meeting of the Mathematical Association of America on April 1, 2016 for “Ay, Batter Batter!” Computational mathematics and art dual major Christi Ho, Class of 2016, presented “Adventures in Art: A Mathematical Analysis of Generative Line Drawings.” Each presentation was based on their Fall 2015 capstone work supervised by Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton. Payne has continued his work this semester in an Independent Study.

  • Professor of Anthropology, Environmental Studies, and Race & Ethnicity Studies Melissa Johnson presented a paper “Becoming Creole: Race and Nature in Belize” on March 30 at the Political Ecology Society/Society for Applied Anthropology 76th Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada. She also served as a discussant for the panel “More-than-Human, Part I: Interspecies Intersections: Reframing Conflict and Co-existence.”

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology Laura Hennefield and nine of her students presented research posters at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association in Dallas.

    • Marieke Visser, Class of 2016, presented “Childhood Competitiveness Predicts Social Anxiety In College Students.”
    • Issa El Hage, Class of 2017, and Roanne Shoubaki, Class of 2017, presented “Happiness In Past, Present, and Future: The Relationship Between Gratitude and Optimism.”
    • Abigail Wilson, Class of 2018, Marguerite Doran, Class of 2018, and Amy Goodman, Class of 2018, presented 
”What Makes a Leader? The Relationship Between Leadership, Optimism, and Social Anxiety.”
    • Kuhen Smith, Class of 2017, presented “The Relationship Between Academically Reckless Behavior and Optimism in College Students.”
    • Eric Blumenschein, Class of 2017, and Morgan Kelly, Class of 2018, presented “Generosity Within the American Political Sphere: The Relationship Between Liberalism and Generosity.”
  • Academic Success & Records Specialist Guillermo Alvarado’s latest work titled ‘”That Gay Gangsta Shit: Identity Construction and Community Membership in Queer Rappers’ Musical Careers” has been selected as the first place winner of the Alpha Kappa Delta Undergraduate Paper Competition.  

  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano and eight of her students presented papers at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association in Dallas this past weekend.

    • Sarah Matthews, Class of 2017, and Kayleigh Thomas, Class of 2018, presented “It’s All About Me: Narcissism as a Predictor of Love Languages,” and won a Psi Chi research award for their poster.
    • Aaron Garcia, Class of 2017, presented “Do As I Do: Expressions and Desires of the Five Love Languages.
    • Marissa Rosa, Class of 2018, and Delaney Dunn, Class of 2018, presented “Frisky Business: The Role of Self-Monitoring in Public Touch.”
    • Helena Lorenz, Class of 2018, Maddie Straup, Class of 2018, and Matt Gonzales, Class of 2018, presented “Be Yourself (Or Your Mom): Parents’ and Offsprings’ Love Languages.”
  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper gave a public lecture titled “Urtext as Empowerment: From Notation to Edition to Performance” at Colorado State University (Ft. Collins) on April 4, 2016. Using autographs and printed editions of works by J. S. Bach and Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, the paper explores how manuscript notation is capable of conveying important interpretive nuances that are difficult to capture in printed editions. It also explores techniques editors can use to capture at least some of this interpretive nuance, and offers suggestions as to how performers can best choose and use printed editions of music in order to best understand what the composer wrote.

  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller presented the paper, “Synthetic Purple in Early Han Royal Court Painting,” on a panel entitled, “Colors in East Asian Civilizations: Concept, Materiality, and Art,” at the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference in Seattle, Washington on April 2, 2016.

  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti presented a paper at the Western Political Science Association conference on March 26th. Her paper was titled “The Dispossession of the Commons and the Common Benefits Clause: Working Against Neoliberal Oligarchy in the U.S. Through State Constitutions.”

  • Visiting Professor of English and Creative Writing John Pipkin won a residential Fellowship at the MacDowell Colony in New Hampshire to support work on his third novel, tentatively titled The Bicycle Notebooks. Pipkin begins his residency in May 2016.

March 2016

  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis performed a world premiere performance of a work commissioned for Chaski. Brandon Nelson composed “Mannanán mac Lir” for flute and lever harp. Flutist Adrienne Inglis and harpist Shana Norton of Chaski performed the premiere March 3, 2016 in Austin, Texas. Chaski will include the piece in its Oceans of Space II tour this summer

  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar presented a paper titled “the New Feminist Citizen: Bad Feminists and the Need for Intersectionality” at Texas A&M’s 2016 Gender and Citizenship conference in College Station on February 18. The following weekend she participated in a roundtable discussion titled “Collaboration and Convergence: Writing Groups, Retreats, Coaches, and Accountability Circles” at the Western States Communication annual convention in San Diego.

  • Professor of Religion Laura Hobgood was invited to be and presented as the Dianne Collins and Alan K. Collins Distinguished Speaker Series at Florida International University in January 2016. Her lecture was titled “Becoming Human and Dog Together.”

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari conducted a performance entitled “On the 20th Century” with guest artist the Austin Civic Orchestra in the Alma Thomas Theater on February 6th. Featured on this concert were Sir David Whitwell, who conducted the world premiere of a piece he wrote especially for the ACO, and Anthony Lannaccone who commissioned Ferrari and the ACO to perform his composition, From Time to Time. The centerpiece for this concert was Igor Stravinsky’s groundbreaking and exciting Firebird Suite. 9 SU students or alums performed as members of the Orchestra, including Gus Sterneman ’06 who is the assistant conductor.

  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was named a Senior Member of the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery). The Senior Member Grade recognizes those ACM members with at least 10 years of professional experience and 5 years of continuous Professional Membership who have demonstrated performance that sets them apart from their peers.

  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum has had his article “Constructing Game Agents Through Simulated Evolution” published in the Encyclopedia of Computer Graphics and Games, which is a living encyclopedia that can be maintained and updated to avoid becoming obsolete. A pre-print is available here.

  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron was awarded an external grant from the Fund for Advancing the Discipline (FAD) of the American Sociological Association. His project is titled “Discriminatory Race and Gender Termination from Low Wage Work”. He will work with sociology majors, Deidra McCall, Class of 2018, and Madeline Carrola, Class of 2018, over two summers to complete this project

  • Associate Professor of English David Gaines conducted a reading of In Dylan Town: A Fan’s Life for a Road Scholar event with the Pacific Northwest Alumni Association on March 20 in Seattle. Revived in 2003, the Southwestern University Alumni Association’s Road Scholar program brings guest speakers to present a topic, and provides opportunity to interact with members of the Southwestern community in an informal academic setting. The Road Scholar program supports the University’s Core Value of lifelong learning.

  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper published a source-critical edition of Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy’s setting of Psalm 98 (MWV A 23) with Bärenreiter Verlag. Composed to inaugurate the politically important New Prussian Liturgy during Mendelssohn’s tenure as Director-General for Church and Sacred Music under King Friedrich Wilhelm IV, the work was first published posthumously, and all editions up to this one have included a number of significant errors. Cooper’s edition corrects these errors and is the first to include an English translation provided by Mendelssohn’s preferred English translator of his works, William Bartholomew.

  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron, Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe and Southwestern graduates Brianna Billingsley ’14 and Nathan Tuttle ’14 had a paper titled “Performativity Double Standards and the Sexual Orientation Climate at a Southern Liberal Arts University” accepted for publication in the Journal of Homosexuality.

  • Professor of Art Mary Visser exhibited work in the invitational exhibition Virtually Solid Digital Fabrication as Sculpture at the South Gallery in the Nathan H. Wilson Center for the Arts sponsored by Florida State College. The exhibit ran from Jan. 6–28, 2016. She was also interviewed for the online journal Women In 3D Printing by Nora Toure. The Interview also appears in the online print journal Fabbaloo that covers all things 3D.

  • Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Joshua Long had a chapter published in a newly released book by Springer titled Learner-Centered Teaching Activities for Environmental and Sustainability Studies. The chapter was titled “Helping Students Envision Justice in the Sustainable City.”

    Long will also present a paper at the Association of American Geographers conference titled “Hipster Hate and the Sabotage of Meaningful Social Commentary.” Additionally, he will serve on a panel at the Association of American Geographers conference. The panel is titled “Approaches to Teaching Sustainability: Towards Increased Understanding of the Economic and Social Pillars.”

  • Associate Professor of Education Alicia Moore recently co-authored a book titled, Borders, Bras and Battles: A Practical Guide to Mentor Undergraduate Women to Achieve Career Success. The book is an account of mentorship with heartfelt stories from students, and provides a valuable roadmap on how to conduct research with undergraduates from diverse populations.

  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer is serving as the 2016 McAndless Distinguished Chair in the Humanities at Eastern Michigan University. Over the course of the winter quarter, she contributed to a faculty seminar on disability studies, met with students, and participated in a women’s and gender studies class. She delivered a public lecture on disability and social justice on March 17, and will make her final visit to campus March 30–April 2.

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of History Joseph Hower’s article, “‘The Sparrows and the Horses’: Daniel Patrick Moynihan, the Family Assistance Plan, and the Liberal Critique of Government Workers, 1955–1977,” was published in the Journal of Policy History 28, no. 2.

  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum’s article “Solving Multiple Isolated, Interleaved, and Blended Tasks through Modular Neuroevolution” has been accepted to the Evolutionary Computation Journal. Additionally, his poster, “Automatic Evolution of Multimodal Behavior with Multi-Brain HyperNEAT,” was accepted into the Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference, which will take place in July 2016 in Denver, Colorado. Also, his previously accepted article, “Discovering Multimodal Behavior in Ms. Pac-Man through Evolution of Modular Neural Networks,” has finally appeared in print in the IEEE Transactions on Computational Intelligence and AI in Games.

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin spoke at the Eminent Scholar Panel honoring Cynthia Weber of Sussex University as a Distinguished Scholar. The panel was sponsored by the International Studies Association’s Feminist Theory and Gender Studies Section and the LGBTQA Caucus at the annual International Studies Association meeting.

  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer gave the opening keynote address at the Crip Futurities Conference at the University of Michigan in February. Her talk, “Blackness, Disability, and Trauma: On Methodological Haunting,” explored connections between race, disability, and death in the contemporary US

  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller published the article, “Jade, Imperial Identity, and Sumptuary Reform in Jia Yi’s Xin Shu” in Dao: a Journal of Comparative Philosophy.

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura was invited to lead a learning session on math and art at the Operation Math Girls Conference for high school girls interested in math at Sam Houston State University on February 20.

  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky presented a paper, “Moteuczoma’s Sculptures: Absence and Presence in Tenochtitlan,” at the Association for Latin American Art’s 4th Triennial Conference at the de Young Museum of Fine Art in San Francisco.

  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper had an article previously published in 19th-Century Music, the leading journal of musical scholarship concerning Romantic music, reprinted. Titled “‘Aber eben dieser Zweifel’: A new look at Mendelssohn’s ‘Italian’ symphony,” the article was reprinted in Benedict Taylor, ed., _Mendelssohn_ (Farnham: Ashgate, 2016).

  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer published her essay “Un/Safe Disclosures” in the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies (10.1, 2016). The essay uses the frame of the “trigger warning” to explore disability studies approaches to trauma and “safety” in academic spaces.

  • Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Faculty Alisa Gaunder had a chapter titled “Women in the 2014 Lower House Election” published in Japan Decides 2014: The Japanese General Election (Palgrave 2016). This volume was edited by Robert J. Pekkanen, Steven R. Reed, and Ethan Scheiner; and focused on the December 2014 election to the lower house of the Japanese Diet.

  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti and political science major Samuel Kim, Class of 2016, co-authored and co-presented a paper at the ACS Gender Studies conference at Southwestern University on February 20th, 2016. Their paper was titled “The ‘Common Benefits Clause’: An Alternative to Liberalism’s Equal Protection Clause.”

  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti has had two previously published articles reprinted. “Adorno on the Radio: Democratic Leadership as Democratic Pedagogy,” originally published in The Journal Political Theory, was reprinted in a volume that collects notable work on Adorno’s politics, titled “Theodor W. Adorno II.” An excerpt from Mariotti’s forthcoming book, Adorno and Democracy: The American Years is also being reprinted in Germany in a volume titled “Die Dialektik der Aufklärung in Amerika,” under contract and forthcoming from Leipzig University Press in 2017. Mariotti also recently accepted an invitation to present a paper, drawing from her forthcoming book, at the Association for Adorno Studies conference, at the Université de Montréal in April 2016.

  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes was part of a roundtable discussion on “Teaching Decolonization” at the Society for French Historical Studies Annual Conference in Nashville on March 4. Byrnes spoke about strategies to teach decolonization across an undergraduate history curriculum, with an emphasis on connecting the process of decolonization to other major developments.

  • Professor of Political Science Tim O’Neill’s article, “The Canucks, Brits and Yanks: Creative Anti-Terrorist Policy Making in the 21st Century,” has been accepted for publication by The Journal of Conflict and Security Law, the leading international journal on anti-terrorist policy.

  • Part-Time Instructor of Applied Music Adrienne Inglis performed a world premiere performance of a work commissioned for Chaski. Brandon Nelson composed “Mannanán mac Lir” for flute and lever harp. Flutist Adrienne Inglis and harpist Shana Norton of Chaski performed the premiere March 3, 2016 in Austin, Texas. Chaski will include the piece in its Oceans of Space II tour this summer.

  • On March 16, Associate Professor of English David Gaines spoke to the Dallas Alumni Association and prospective students about his teaching, writing, and Southwestern. He also spoke to alumni and prospectives in Seattle on March 20 before presenting “Bob Dylan, ‘Theme Time Radio Hour’ and the Big Tent” at the American Culture/Popular Culture Association annual meeting in Seattle on March 24. In between Dallas and Seattle he presented, by invitation, “The Protest Songs of Bob Dylan” to the Sun City Democrats in Georgetown on March 19.

February 2016

  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Valerie Renegar presented a paper titled “the New Feminist Citizen: Bad Feminists and the Need for Intersectionality” at Texas A&M’s 2016 Gender and Citizenship conference in College Station on February 18. The following weekend she participated in a roundtable discussion titled “Collaboration and Convergence: Writing Groups, Retreats, Coaches, and Accountability Circles” at the Western States Communication annual convention in San Diego.

  • Professor of Music Kenny Sheppard conducted a master class for the choirs at Texas A&M, Kingsville on February 22.

  • Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer gave the opening keynote address at the Crip Futurities Conference at the University of Michigan in February. Her talk, “Blackness, Disability, and Trauma: On Methodological Haunting,” explored connections between race, disability, and death in the contemporary US.

  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum has had his article “Constructing Game Agents Through Simulated Evolution” published in the Encyclopedia of Computer Graphics and Games, which is a living encyclopedia that can be maintained and updated to avoid becoming obsolete. A pre-print is available here

  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony was named a Senior Member of the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery). The Senior Member Grade recognizes those ACM members with at least 10 years of professional experience and 5 years of continuous Professional Membership who have demonstrated performance that sets them apart from their peers.

  • Professor of Music, Lois Ferrari, conducted a performance entitled “On the 20th Century” with guest artist the Austin Civic Orchestra in the Alma Thomas Theater on February 6th. Featured on this concert were Sir David Whitwell, who conducted the world premiere of a piece he wrote especially for the ACO, and Anthony Lannaccone who commissioned Ferrari and the ACO to perform his composition, From Time to Time. The centerpiece for this concert was Igor Stravinsky’s groundbreaking and exciting Firebird Suite. Nine SU students or alumni performed as members of the Orchestra, including Gus Sterneman ’06 who is the assistant conductor.

  • Associate Professor of English David Gaines presented “Bob Dylan, Spiritual Journeys, and Us” to the graduating class of St. Stephen’s Episcopal School in Austin on February 26.

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin helped lead a workshop on “Decolonizing the Teaching of International Relations” and was a participant in the “Inclusive Classroom” track the annual American Political Science Association Teaching & Learning Conference in February.

  • American Association for the History of Medicine awards Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones the prestigious Jack D. Pressman-Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Development Award for his project Medicine in a Revolution: Homeopathy and the Regulation of the Medical Profession in Mexico, 1853-1942.

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari conducted the WMEA All-State Band on February 11-14. The 150-member ensemble was comprised of premier Washington state high school music students. Dr. Ferrari rehearsed the group 7 hours each day and then presented a public concert at the conclusion of the bi-annual conference. This was Dr. Ferrari’s second invitation from WMEA in six years.

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers contributed an article to the Chronicle of Higher Education titled “Feeding English Majors in the 21st Century.” The article acknowledges the need for undergraduates in the humanities to market themselves for the new “economic normal.”

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers contributed a post titled “Holy and Unholy Tweets” to the Lilith Magazine blog.

  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger provided a review of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” by Shit-faced Shakespeare, from their January 22 performance at Spider House in Austin.

  • Associate Professor of English and Director of National Fellowships and Scholarships David Gaines was interviewed in a two part series on Expecting Rain, one of the pioneer sites on the web dealing with Bob Dylan, Dylan’s influences, lyrics, records and the latest concert reviews. Parts one and two can be found respectively.

January 2016

  • Professor of Religion Laura Hobgood was invited to be and presented as the Dianne Collins and Alan K. Collins Distinguished Speaker Series at Florida International University in January 2016. Her lecture was titled “Becoming Human and Dog Together.”

  • Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci’s research conducted over the past two summers as part of the HHMI SCOPE summer research program titled “Exposure to Methylphenidate during Peri-adolescence Affects Endocrine Function and Sexual Behavior in Female Long-Evans Rats” has been recently published in Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior. Co-authors include current student Christina Crandall as well as a number of Psychology and Animal Behavior alumni: F. A., Holifield, C. Morales-Valenzuela, J., Greene, K., Brown, J., Lopez, R., Crandall, C., Gibbs, N., Vela, R., Delgado, M.Y., Frohardt, R.J.

  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones presented a paper titled “Science, Professional Training, and Public Health: The Sanitation of the Medical Profession in Post-Revolutionary Mexico, 1920-1934” at the joint meeting of the Conference for Latin American History and the American Historical Association, in Atlanta, Georgia on January 9, 2016.

  • Four faculty from Southwestern’s Mathematics and Computer Science Department attended the Joint Mathematics Meeting in Seattle, WA, Jan 6-9, 2016: Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr, Associate Professor Mathematics Fumiko Futamura, Associate Professor Mathematics Therese Shelton and Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science John Ross.

    Marr presented a talk co-authored with Futamura, “Math and Study Abroad: Two Examples from a London Semester Program.”

    Futamura presented a talk co-authored with alumnus Robert Lehr, “Finding the Viewpoint at a Museum: A How-To Guide” on their collaborative research. Futamura was also a co-author with Annalisa Crannell and Marc Frantz on the presentation “The perspective image(s) of a square.”

    Ross presented “Incorporating emails and discussions into weekly assessments” and participated in Project NExT sessions.

    Shelton presented “Active DE with Inquiry and More,” participated in the Officer’s’ Meeting of the Mathematical Association of America, helped lead the SIMIODE reception, and took a Minicourse on “R and R Studio.”

  • Assistant Professor of Economics Patrick Van Horn chaired a American Economic Association web session “Historical Perspectives on Financial Crisis, Banks and Regulation” and coauthored one of the papers in the session. See webcast.

  • Associate Professor of Sociology Sandi Nenga published a co-edited book (with Allison Hurst of Oregon State University).  The book titled Working in Class: Recognizing How Social Class Shapes Our Academic Work and was published in January 2016 by Rowman & Littlefield.

December 2015

  • In December, Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin was an invited guest at a conference entitled “What’s the Point of IR” convened to celebrate 50 years of International Relations at the University of Sussex.

  • Assistant Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo presented a paper titled, “On Embodied Knowledge and Religious Transformations: Liminality and Nepantla in the Texas-Mexico Borderlands” at the 2015 American Anthropological Association annual meeting in Denver, Colorado in December. Her presentation was part of an invited session titled, “Diaspora, Dreams, And Embodiment: Reflections on Latina/o Migrations, Methods, and the Making of Familiar Roads of Survival” sponsored by the Association of Latina and Latino Anthropologists and The Society of Humanist Anthropology.

  • Michael Saenger, Associate Professor of English, published a review of Jewish Culture in Early Modern Europe: Essays in Honor of David B. Ruderman in Sixteenth Century Studies Journal.  The book is a wide-ranging study of Jewish life in Europe and the Mediterranean during the early modern period.

  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes contributed two pieces about the November Paris attacks to the influential Lawyers, Guns and Money blog. The first “Solidarity and ‘Je suis Paris’” emphasized the importance of global and local solidarity in the wake of the violence. The second “Saint Denis Solidarity and Security” cautioned against expansive police and security measures.

  • On December 12, Associate Professor of English David Gaines culminated his fall and winter of book-related activities by participating in the Texas Humanities Council Holiday Book Fair with a dozen writers from around the state. All proceeds from the sale of his “In Dylan Town: A Fan’s Notes” went to state libraries. Earlier in the fall, he met with approximately 40 alumni at Homecoming and read from his book on October 17. On October 19 he introduced Michael Gray, author of “The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia,” as the English Department’s Howard Crawford lecturer. On October 30 he gave an invited talk at the Marble Falls Public Library to hill country residents. He also accepted invitations to speak about “In Dylan Town” in Seattle, Los Angeles, Austin, and Dallas in the coming year.

November 2015

  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes gave a paper entitled “Living with ‘Our Algerian Brothers’: The Historical Effects of Space and Proximity on Community Relations with North African Migrants in the Parisian Suburbs” at the interdisciplinary conference, “Migrants in the City” hosted by the University of Sheffield (UK) in October.

  • Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony had an article published in the November 2015 issue of the journal Graphs and Combinatorics. The publication, “Complete r-partite Graphs Determined by their Domination Polynomial”, was joint work with Michael Picollelli from California State University San Marcos.

  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi presented her paper titled, “Lean In, Lean Out, or Both?:  Insights and Perspectives from Marketing Leaders” at the Society of Marketing Advances Conference held in San Antonio, Texas on November 4-7, 2015. She also chaired sessions on “Understanding Consumers’ Behaviors on Social Behavior” and “Market Orientation and Innovation.”

  • Assistant Professor of History Thomas Howe was invited to present a paper Wed., Nov. 4, at the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei (“Lynxes”) in the Villa Farnesina in Rome in the conference “Enhancing Reliance of Historic Sites to Earthquakes.” His paper suggested developing an unorthodox method of global management of designing and executing geotechnical stabilization of sites such as the Stabiae Roman villas by studying the highly successful aerospace industry and the key element of the “prime contractor.” The Lincei is the oldest scientific academy in Europe and remains one of the most prestigious. Galileo spoke there in 1617.

  • Assistant Professor of History Thomas Howe will present a paper at the international conference in Florence entitled: “Life Beyond Tourism”, 7TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 2015, International conference on contemporary problems of Architecture and Construction7 - The fruition of the heritage: cultural value-based travel, routes and landscape. New uses and enhancement of monuments.” Howe will speak on “Defining an Archaeological Park: the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Master Plan 2001 and Work Since 2007, and will trace the origins of archaeological parks from the Civil War battlefields, Yellowstone, and the Via Appia in Rome.”

  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper presented a paper titled “Music and Cultural Transfer in the Fourierist Community of La Réunion, Texas (1855-58), with a Little-Known Songbook” at the national convention of the American Musicological Society in Louisville, Kentucky, on November 14.

  • A still-unpublished concert aria by Felix Mendelssohn discovered by Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper was performed on Oct. 30 by one of the world’s oldest professional orchestras, the Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra, which celebrates its 250th birthday in 2015. The work featured renowned soprano soloist Lisa Larsson and was conducted by Jan Willem de Vriend.

  • Professor of Music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Michael Cooper published an article titled “Escape to – and from – Utopia: Fourierist Philosophy and Musical Life in the Colony of La Réunion, Texas” in the Summer 2015 issue of American Music (pp. 141-75).

October 2015

  • Assistant Professor of History Jessica Hower’s article “Under One (Inherited) Imperial Crown: The Global Origins of Britain and its Empire, 1603-1625,” was published in the journal Britain and the World (Edinburgh University Press) volume 8, no. 2 (September, 2015): pp. 160-180. The article is a revised and expanded version of her 2014 conference paper, which won the Wm. Roger Louis Prize at the British Scholar Society annual conference in Newcastle, UK.

  • Lois Ferrari, Professor of Music and Music Director of the Austin Civic Orchestra, conducted a cross-genre concert entitled “Spaghetti Western” at the Long Center for the Performing Arts on Sunday, September 20th. Ferrari and the ACO presented a Classical-Latino program with Latin rock star Rick Del Castillo and his band, in addition to a 100 voice choir. The first half of the program was a live performance of the Castillo’s award-winning soundtrack for the independent film “Killing Snakes.” The second half was all ACO with the 85-member orchestra performing music from classic spaghetti western films in addition to the Marquez Danzon No. 2. Prior to this concert, Ferrari and Del Castillo made an appearance on KTBC TV’s Good Morning Austin morning program.

  • Assistant Professor of Business Debika Sihi presented in and chaired a session on Interdisciplinary Marketing Education at the Fall 2015 Marketing Management Conference (September 16, 2015-September 18, 2015 in San Juan, Puerto Rico).

  • Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller’s article, “Emperor Wen’s ‘Baling’ Mountain Tomb: Innovation in Political Rhetoric and Necropolis Design in Early China,” was published in Asia Major, an international journal of Chinese Studies.

  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky was invited by the Université de Toulouse–Le Mirail to give a talk for a special congress on the sixteenth-century French royal cosmographer André Thevet on December 2-4. Hajovsky will discuss Thevet’s idea of truth as a traveler and eyewitness of the wonders of the New World, his construction of the engraved portrait of Moctezuma, and what this and other portraits reveal about the incorporation of Amerindians into European history.

  • Associate Professor of Communications Studies Bob Bednar presented a paper titled “Moving Pictures: Trauma, Affect, and Photography at Roadside Crash Shrines” at the Affect, Images, & Digital Media Conference at the University of Utah on September 4, 2015.

  • Helene Meyers, Professor of English and McManis University Chair, reviewed “Woman in Gold” for The Journal of Religion and Film.  Read the review.

  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger presented a paper on Shakespeare in multiple languages at the Blackfriars Conference, hosted by the American Shakespeare Center.  A blog of the panel can be found here.

  • Professor of Religion Elaine Craddock presented her paper “Kali Moves Into Tamil Country” for the Regional Bhakti Scholars Network’s day-long panel on “Who’s In, Who’s Out?” at the 44th annual South Asia Conference in Madison, WI, October 22, 2015.

  • At the recent European International Studies Association meeting, Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin presented a paper entitled “The Story in Our Eyes: The Implications of a Storied IR” and was part of roundtable on “Decolonizing the Teaching of International Relations.” In addition, he served as Chair and Discussant for a panel “Critiquing Eurocentric Representations: Voices/Perspectives from the Global South” as well as Chair and Discussant for a panel “Interrogating ‘Modernity’: Progress, Development, & Postcolonial Appropriations.

September 2015

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari was featured on Austin’s Fox 7’s Good Day program on Sept. 17. Watch the interview here.

  • Associate Professor of English David Gaines read from and signed copies of In Dylan Town: A Fan’s Life (University of Iowa Press, 2015) at Austin’s Book People on September 2. He did likewise at the Cedar Rapids, Iowa Barnes and Noble on September 25 and participated the next day in the program “Music is the Word” co-sponsored by the Iowa City Public Library, Prairie Lights Books, and the University of Iowa Press. The Austin American Statesman, San Antonio Express and Cedar Rapids Gazette all published articles related to In Dylan Town throughout the month.

  • Helene Meyers, Professor of English and McManis University Chair, contributed a post titled “Holy and Unholy Tweets” to the Lilith Magazine blog.  Read it here.

  • Professor and Brown Chair Mary Visser of the Art Department was honored by the selection of five artworks for the The Art Center of Corpus Christi’s new exhibit, “Celebrating Women in Art Education,” recognizing distinguished women in higher education across Texas. The exhibit showcased artwork of 20 women educators from 11 universities and colleges in the Meadows Fine Art Gallery, Corpus Christi Texas.

    Visser’s 3D printed sculptures are featured in the books 3D Technology in Fine Art and Craft: Exploring 3D Printing, Scanning, Sculpting and Milling, by Bridgette Mongeon, Additive Manufacturing by Prof. A. Bernard and C. Barlier of France, and 3D Printing for Artists, Designers, and Makers by Stephen Hoskins Bloomsbury 2015.

  • Associate Professor of History Melissa Byrnes presented a paper titled “Harnessing Religion in the Service of Empire: French Laicite v. British Laissez-Faire?” at a colloquium on “Translating Secularism/Traduire la laicite,” hosted by the University of Southampton and the Insitut Francais Du Royaume Uni in London on September 18. She also chaired a panel on “Laicite and Religion.”

  • Associate Professor of Philosophy Michael Bray’s article, “Rearticulating Contemporary Populism: Class, State, and Neoliberal Society” appears in the most recent issue of the journal “Historical Materialism” (23:3). Bray will present a paper, “What if ‘the Party’ is Populist? - Thoughts on Parliamentary Cretinism and Socialist Strategy,” at the Historical Materialism conference in London in November. 

  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky released a new book through University of Texas Press, “On the Lips of Others: Moteuczoma’s Fame in Aztec Monuments and Rituals.” A review excerpt: “Dr. Hajovsky’s scholarship is careful and rigorous, and it deftly balances detailed analysis of evidence, physical and textual, with interpretation and speculation.” http://utpress.utexas.edu/index.php/books/hajovsky-on-the-lips-of-others

  • Professor of Economics Emily Northrop published an entry, “The Economic Cost of the Western Diet,” in The SAGE Encyclopedia of Food Issues, edited by Ken Albala, SAGE Publications, 2015.

  • Professor of Economics Emily Northrop published a book review on The Climate Casino: Risk, Uncertainty, and Economics for a Warming World by William Nordhaus, Yale University Press: Review of Political Economy, 27 (Issue 1, 2015) 86-89.

  • Professor of Economics Emily Northrop published a book chapter titled “Food, the Environment, and A Good Standard of Living” in the book A Brighter Future: Improving the Standard of Living Now and for the Next Generation, edited by Richard P.F. Holt and Daphne T. Greenwood, M.E. Sharpe, 2014.

  • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe attended the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA) meeting in Chicago, where she presented a paper co-authored with Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron titled “The Specter of Gendered Aggression: Predicting Students’ Level of Comfort at Weekend Campus Parties.” She was also a presider at two sessions and has agreed to serve on the graduate student paper award committee for the Race, Gender and Class section during the 2015-2016 academic year. 

  • Barbara Anthony, associate professor of computer science, and Rick Denman, professor emeritus of mathematics and computer science, had an article published in the August 2015 “Journal of Combinatorial Mathematics and Combinatorial Computing” titled “Conditions for the Bicolorability of Primitive Hypergraphs.”

  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones was awarded the Hans-Walz prize by The Hans Walz Foundation at the Robert Bosch Stiftung for his doctoral dissertation titled “Revolutionary Medicine: Homeopathy and the Regulation of the Medical Profession in Mexico, 1853-1942”. The institute awards the best monograph on the history of homeopathy every other year, receiving in this occasion submissions from Germany, Spain and Brazil. 

  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger published a review of a bilingual adaptation of Shakespeare in San Marcos. Find it here.

  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti has completed a co-edited volume of essays titled “A Political Companio to Marilynne Robinson.” It is forthcoming from the University Press of Kentucky and will be published in fall 2016. 

  • In August 2015, Patricia Schiaffini, part-time assistant professor of Chinese, along with Adrienne Dodd ’15 and Hunter Jurgens, class of 2017, did field-work in Tibetan areas in China. This research was funded with a generous grant from the Asia Network and the Freeman Foundation. Collaborative papers based on their research findings will be presented at the Southwest Conference on Asian Studies (SWCAS) in Fort Worth in November 2015 and at the Annual Meeting of the Asia Network in St. Petersburg, Fla. in March 2016. 

  • Associate Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde received two performances of his vocal composition, Voy a Dormir, from the Chorus Austin Chamber Ensemble, on May 16-17.

  • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe attended the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA) meeting in Chicago, where she presented a paper she co-authored with Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron, titled “The Specter of Gendered Aggression: Predicting Students’ Level of Comfort at Weekend Campus Parties.” She was also a presider at two sessions and has agreed to serve on the graduate student paper award committee for the Race, Gender and Class section during the 2015-2016 academic year. 

  • Associate Professor of Spanish Katy Ross recently signed a book contract with Bucknell University Press for her book “The Changing Face of Motherhood in Spain: The Works of Lucía Etxebarria.” This interdisciplinary work focuses on how the representation and construction of motherhood has changed in recent films and fictional works by Spanish author Lucía Etxebarria.

August 2015

  • Associate Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron had a teaching exercise titled “Teaching the Sociological Imagination with SAT Data” published in TRAILS, The American Sociological Association’s Teaching Resources And Innovations Library for Sociology and had a co-authored methodological paper titled “Patterns of Local Segregation: Do They Matter for Crime?” accepted for publication at the journal “Social Science Research.” Additionally, Reggie has been invited to serve on the editorial boards for the journals “Work and Occupations” (a leading international sociological journal) and “Social Currents” (a new journal affiliated with the Southern Sociological Society). Finally, he recently gave a presentation titled “From Boston to Belfast: The Rhetoric of Racism in Employment Discrimination Cases in the U.S. and the U.K.” at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland and two presentations at the Annual Meetings of the American Sociological Association in Chicago. One was an invited paper titled “Organizational Legitimation of Sex Discrimination” and one was a paper co-authored with Maria Lowe titled “The Specter of Gendered Aggression: Predicting Students’ Level of Comfort at Weekend Campus Parties.”

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton participated in two workshops within the Professional Enhancement Program (PREP), which is partially funded by the National Science Foundation. “Advanced Techniques in the Implementation and Creation of Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) Activities” was held in Tampa, Fla. in July. “Building Community in SIMIODE - Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations” was held in Helena, Mont. in July. Shelton created inquiry-oriented modules for her classes based on these workshops and the HHMI Inquiry Initiative. She also participated in a workshop on Inquiry-Oriented Differential Equations (IODE) in August in Washington, D.C.; the workshop was supported by the National Science Foundation.  

  • Associate Professors of Mathematics Therese Shelton, Fumiko Futamura and Alison Marr, and Visiting Assistant Professor John Ross attended MathFest, the August 2015 meeting of the Mathematical Association of America. Marr participated in a minicourse on “Creating Flipped Learning Experiences in the College Mathematics Classroom.” Shelton participated in a minicourse on “The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning,” and was invited to serve on the panel for the Project NExT Workshop (New Experiences in Teaching) on Aug 3, 2015, prior to MathFest. Ross is a NExT Fellow.  

  • Professor of Political Science Bob Snyder had his paper titled, “The Arab Uprising and the Persistence of Monarchy,” accepted for publication in the journal “International Affairs,” and his paper titled, “The United States and Nicaragua: Understanding the Breakdown in Relations,” (with Robert Hager) was accepted for publication in the “Journal of Cold War Studies.”

  • Assistant Professor of Economics Patrick Van Horn published the article “Did the Reserve Requirement Increments of 1936-1937 Reduce Bank Lending? Evidence from a Quasi-Experiment” with Haelim Park in the August 2015 issue of “Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking.”

  • Assistant Professor of Economics Katie Grooms has an article forthcoming in the “Journal of Environmental Economics and Management” titled “Enforcing the Clean Water Act: The Effect of State-level Corruption on Compliance.”  

  • Switchboard Operator Evelyn Rossi and Becky Gregory, wife of Head Soccer Coach Don Gregory, checked off one item on their “bucket list” by hiking the Grand Canyon Trail in Oct. 2014.

  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger’s recent blog post, “Political Correctness, Academic Relevance and Israel,” was published by the Times of Israel. In addition, his recent article, “Interlinguicity and the Alchemist,” was reprinted in the edited volume, Multilingualism in the Drama of Shakespeare and his Contemporaries, edited by Ton Hoenselaars and Dirk Delabastita and published by John Benjamins in the Netherlands.

  • Assistant Professor of History Jess Hower attended three conferences this spring and summer.

    (1) The Trans-Atlantic Dialogues on Cultural Heritage: Heritage, Tourism and Traditions Conference in July, which was sponsored by the Ironbridge International Institute (University of Birmingham, UK) and University of Illinois, where she presented a paper titled “The Afterlives of John Cabot: The History, Heritage, and Memory of England’s First Trans-Atlantic Encounters, 1496-1707.”

    (2) The Cannibalism in the Early Modern Atlantic Conference at the University of Southampton in June, where she presented a paper titled “’… And greedily devoured them’: The Cannibalism Discourse and the Creation of a British Atlantic World, 1536- 1612.” The research she presented has since been selected for publication in an edited volume on Cannibalism in the “Early Modern Atlantic,” under contract with the University of Arkansas Press.

    (3) The British Scholar Society’s annual Britain and the World Conference in Austin in April, where she chaired two panels and presented a paper titled “The First Scottish Empire: Scotland, Britain, and the Early Modern Imperial World.” 

  • Professor of Art Mary Visser was selected to exhibit her sculptural works in “Celebrating Women in Art Education” at the Art Center of Corpus Christi in July, featuring 21 female educators from 11 Texas universities who teach as well as pursue personal art careers. Visser’s art work is also featured in the book “3D Technology in Fine Art and Craft: Exploring 3D Printing, Scanning,” published 2015 by Bridgette Mongeon.

  • Associate Professor of Theatre Kerry Bechtel designed a three-show summer repertory season of Chicago, Ring of Fire and Big Fish with the Alpine Theatre Project, Montana’s premiere regional theatre company in Whitefish, Montana. 

  • Professor of English and McManis University Chair Helene Meyers contributed a post to the “Lilith Magazine” blog on Rainbow Jews and the Jerusalem Pride Parade.

  • Stacie Brown, director of first year biology laboratories, has been selected to participate in the Prevalence of Antibiotic-Resistant microbes in the Environment (PARE) project, a program through Yale University that provides undergraduates the opportunity to do research and contribute data to a national database. This is in alignment with the Biology Department’s efforts to transform the laboratory exercises into research, which has been partially supported by the HHMI grant.

  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger’s blog post about the Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage was published by the “Times of Israel” 

  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti recently signed a contract with the University Press of Kentucky to publish her second book, “Another Adorno: Democracy in America.” The book explores Adorno’s theory of democratic leadership as democratic pedagogy to inform the practice of citizenship in the U.S. and will be published in spring 2016. 

July 2015

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, contributed a post to the “Lilith Magazine” blog on the Charleston massacre. Read it here.

  • Professor of History Thomas McClendon attended the biennial meeting of the Southern African Historical Society in Stellenbosch, South Africa, where he presented a paper titled “Restraining Apartheid’s Whip Hand: Reforming Judicial Corporal Punishment in the 1960s and 1970s.”

  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones gave a talk, “Scientific Medical Training for the Working Class: Homeopathic Medical Schools and the Centralization of Medical Education in Mexico City, 1895-1940,” in Spanish at the Department of Educational Research, Center of Research and Advanced Studies (CINVESTAV), National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) and at the Department of the History of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), both in Mexico City in June. 

  • Five faculty from Southwestern’s Mathematics Department attended the Texas Section Meeting of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) in San Antonio, April 17-18, 2015: Associate Professor Alison Marr, Associate Professor Gary Richter, Associate Professor Therese Shelton, Professor Kendall Richards, and President Ed Burger.

    Richter presented “Limits and Composition of Functions in Calculus.” Shelton was presented with The Ron Barnes Distinguished Service to Students Award; President Burger regaled attendees with his introduction of the award. Shelton participated in the Executive Committee Meeting of the Texas Section of the MAA, moving from Chair-Elect to Chair, and participated in the Meeting of the Texas Association of Academic Administrators in the Mathematical Sciences. 

  • President Ed Burger was an invited principal speaker at the 18th Annual R.L. Moore Inquiry-Based Learning Conference, “Empowering with Inquiry-Based Learning,” co-sponsored by the Educational Advancement Foundation and the Mathematical Association of America on June 25-27, 2015 at The University of Texas at Austin. His talks was titled “The Southwestern Experience: An Institutional Commitment to Engaged Student Learning.” Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr was part of the conference’s program committee.

    Associate Professor Gary Richter presented two talks: “R.L. Moore’s Geometry–Summer 1968” and “When IBL is not Enough.” Associate Professor Therese Shelton presented a poster on “Injections of IBL.” Shelton’s and Burger’s talks highlighted IBL across the Natural Sciences and beyond under the Howard Hughes Medical Institute funded Inquiry Initiative at Southwestern. 

  • While attending the 2015 Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference in Madrid, Spain, Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum won an award for best paper within the Digital Entertainment and Arts track. Nominations for best paper awards are chosen by conference track organizers based on peer reviews, and award winners are voted on by conference attendees after all competing papers are presented, of which there were two competitors. The paper, titled “Solving Interleaved and Blended Sequential Decision-Making Problems through Modular Neuroevolution,” can be found here.

June 2015

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin presented the opening keynote lecture “Revolutionary Imaginaries Across Time, Place, and Space: Mining Myth and Memory and Manufacturing Meaning” and chaired the concluding panel “Adapting Myth” at the conference “Heroic Narratives and the Reshaping of History: A Comparative Perspective.” The conference, inspired by Selbin’s work, was held at The University of Copenhagen June 11-12, 2015.

    Selbin also presented a paper titled “Spaces and Places of (Im)Possibility and Desire: Transversal Revolutionary Imaginaries in the 20th Century Americas” at the Latin American Studies Association meeting in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari collaborated with soloists from the Butler School of Music at The University of Texas to present the 3rd annual Texas Rising Stars concert. As Music Director of the Austin Civic Orchestra, Ferrari and assistant conductor Gus Sterneman ’06 conducted concerti for the four talented soloists in addition to Mozart’s Marriage of Figaro Overture, and the rarely programmed, jazz-influenced Creation du Monde by Darius Milhaud. The concert took place on May 10.

  • Assistant Dean for Student Multicultural Affairs Terri Johnson gave a presentation about self expression and empowerment titled “If Only My Voice Could Be Heard: Using Poetry to Create Dialogue About Racism and Sexism,” at the 28th annual National Conference on Race & Ethnicity in American Higher Education (NCORE 2015), May 26-30 in Washington, D.C.

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, reviewed the film “Felix and Meira” for Lilith Magazine’s blog. Read her review.

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura was invited to join the panel of advisors for NPR’s Studio 360 Science and Creativity Series for 2016. She will advise the national radio program on their coverage of math and creativity. In addition, Futamura’s co-authored article, “Dürer: Disguise, Distance, Disagreements, and Diagonals!” in Math Horizons will re-appear in the 2015 edition of the annual anthology, The Best Writing on Mathematics edited by Mircea Pitici.

May 2015

  • Stacie Brown, director of first year biology laboratories, is a co-author for a paper published in Microbiology titled “Indole inhibition of N-acylated homoserine lactone-mediated quorum signaling is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria.”

  • Associate Professors of Biology Maria Cuevas, Maria Todd and Rebecca Sheller have an article in press in the International Journal of Oncology titled “Estrogen-dependent expression and subcellular localization of the tight junction protein claudin-4 in HEC-1A endometrial cancer cells.” This work was done in collaboration with Jonathan King, associate professor of biology at Trinity University, and two former SU biology students: Jenna Gaska ’13, currently pursuing a Ph.D. at Princeton, and Dr. Andrea Holland Gist ’11, currently doing her residency in family medicine.

  • Associate Professors of Biology Maria Cuevas, Maria Todd and Rebecca Sheller published a paper in Oncology Letters titled “Overexpression and delocalization of claudin-3 protein in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-415 breast cancer cell lines.”

  • In April 2015, Associate Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer gave a talk titled “Breath, Skin, Fog: Disability and Environmental Justice” at Middlebury College, and led a workshop on social justice and cross-movement activism while there. She was also invited to share a work-in-progress with the Disability Studies Seminar at the University of Kansas, where she workshopped her essay “Un/Safe Disclosures: Scenes of Disability and Trauma” with an interdisciplinary group of faculty and graduate students. Also during the month she gave a reading from her book “Feminist Queer Crip” at Western Kentucky University as part of the Social Justice and Coalition-Building series. 

  • Associate Professor of Political Science Shannon Mariotti will have an article that was first published in the journal “Political Theory” reprinted in a definitive two-volume study of the politics of the critical theorist Theodor Adorno. Her article, “Adorno on the Radio: Democratic Leadership as Democratic Pedagogy,” will be reprinted in “Adorno,” edited by Espen Hammer and forthcoming from Routledge in October 2015. 

  • Assistant Professor of History Jethro Hernandez Berrones presented a paper titled “The Sanitary Dictatorship and the Criminalization of Medical Practice in Post-Revolutionary Mexico, 1920s and 30s” at the Rocky Mountain Conference for Latin American Studies in Tucson in April. 

  • Instructor of Environmental Studies M. Anwar Sounny-Slitine, along with students Brandee Knight and Dakota McDurham, presented the results of their faculty-student research project titled “The Effects of Virtual Environments on Spatial Awareness in Adolescents” at the annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers in Chicago. Read the abstract.

  • This spring, Associate Professor of Math Fumiko Futamura gave two invited talks on “How to Mathematically Immerse Yourself in a Work of Art”—at Sam Houston State University and at the Infinite Horizons Lecture Series at Kennesaw State University.

  • Associate Professor of Math Fumiko Futamura co-authored an article in the Dec. 2014 issue of “Journal of Mathematics and the Arts” on a mathematical analysis of Dürer’s solid in his engraving, Melencolia I for its 500th anniversary. The cross ratio as a shape parameter for Dürer’s solid. 

  • Assistant Professor of History Melissa Byrnes presented at the Society for French Historical Studies annual conference in April. Her paper, “Mediterranean Crossings: Over the Border or Along the Boulevard?,” was partly inspired by her involvement in the Mediterranean Mingling Paideia cluster.

April 2015

  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Bob Bednar’s article, titled “Placing Affect: Remembering Strangers at Roadside Crash Shrines” was published in the book “Affective Landscapes in Literature, Art and Everyday Life: Memory, Place and the Senses.” (Ashgate Press, 2015).

  • Michael Cooper, professor of music and holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair, presented a paper titled “Music and Cultural Transfer in the Fourierist Community of La Réunion, Texas (1855-58), with a Little-Known Songbook” at the Southwest Chapter meeting of the American Musicological Society on April 11, 2015. The paper is the first to connect the philosophical and musical ideas of the utopian socialist Charles Fourier (1772-1837) and his disciple Victor Considerant (1808-93) with the community of Belgian, French and Swiss immigrants established near the village of Dallas in 1855. It also discusses a previously unrecognized songbook held in the library of The University of Texas at Arlington as a thematizing of the issues that led to the community’s formation. 

  • Professor of English Eileen Cleere delivered a paper and chaired a panel at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Association (INCS) annual meeting in Atlanta, April 16-19. Her talk, “Going Downtown: The Adolescent Afterlife of *Lady Audley’s Secret*,” is part of a new project on adolescent literature, public libraries and the private reading habits of American teenagers. Cleere also presented her research at the “Experience Southwestern” event in Houston on April 19. The lecture was attended by alumni, trustees and prospective students from the Houston area.

  • Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Josh Long has been interviewed for or mentioned in three recent publications: The New York Times, Inc. Magazine, and Exame (a large Brazilian magazine). 

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth received a nationally competitive grant to participate in a faculty development summer seminar sponsored by the American Association of Teachers of German. Her participation is made possible through funding from the Transatlantik-Programm der Bundesrepublik Deutschland through funds of the European Recovery Program (ERP) of the Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft und Energie. The seminar, held June 13 - July 4, 2015, at the Herder-Institute at the University of Leipzig, will explore the integration of MINT/STEM subjects in the German curriculum. In addition to observing classroom instruction, experiencing numerous workshops, and designing instructional materials, participants will visit the Deutsches Hygiene-Museum in Dresden and enjoy a two-day excursion to Wolfsburg for a hands-on experience with leaders in the German auto industry.

  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum and Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth hosted a campus-wide lecture on March 6, 2015, funded through their Associated Colleges of the South Blended Learning Grant. The presenter was Mohamed Esa, professor of German at McDaniel College and President of the American Association of Teachers of German. Esa taught two German classes, featuring Rammstein’s “Ich will” and the Grimm fairytale “Der goldene Schlüssel.” He engaged with students and faculty during lunch, discussing neue deutsche Härte – Germany’s heavy metal scene – and gave a thought-provoking lecture titled “Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum – CLAC – Integrating STEM and Languages.”

  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky’s first book on Aztec sculpture and the concept of fame in Montezuma’s world will be published in June with the University of Texas Press. 

  • Michael Cooper (Professor of Music and holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair) presented a paper titled “Music and Cultural Transfer in the Fourierist Community of La Réunion, Texas (1855-58), with a Little-Known Songbook” at the Southwest Chapter meeting of the American Musicological Society on April 11, 2015. The paper is the first to connect the philosophical and musical ideas of the utopian socialist Charles Fourier (1772-1837) and his disciple Victor Considerant (1808-93) with the community of Belgian, French, and Swiss immigrants that was established near the village of Dallas in 1855. It also discussed a previously unrecognized songbook held in the library of the University of Texas at Arlington as a thematizing of the issues that led to the community’s formation. 

  • Associate Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer will speak at West Kentucky University in The Institute for Citizenship and Social Responsibility. 

  • Associate Professor of Sociology Sandi Nenga published a book chapter with students Guillermo A. Alvarado ’15 and Claire S. Blyth ’16. The chapter, titled “I Kind of Found My People: Latina/O College Students’ Search for Social Integration on Campus,” was published in “College Students’ Experiences of Power and Marginality: Sharing Spaces and Negotiating Differences.” 

  • Christine Bowman ’93, interim dean of admission and enrollment Service, presented twice at the 35th Annual Texas Association of College Admission Counseling Conference in Houston, April 9-11. The first presentation addressed “The Importance of Fine Arts in College Readiness and Admission.” The second presentation, made with other ICUT members, was titled “Committed to Access: Attaining Affordability in a Private Education” and promoted private college education in Texas.

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, was invited to participate in a round table on recent scholarship in critical theory at the Western Political Science Association conference in Las Vegas, April 1-3. She presented a paper titled, “Another Adorno: After Despair?,” drawing from her book manuscript “Another Adorno: Democracy in America,” currently under review with a university press. 

  • Associate Professor of Sociology Sandi Nenga presented a paper titled “Defining Effective Teaching at Two Private Liberal Arts Colleges” at the annual meetings of the Southern Sociological Society in New Orleans on March 26. The paper was co-authored with Kathryn G. Hadley of Hanover College.

  • M. Anwar Sounny-Slitine, instructor of environmental studies and GIS lab manager, along with environmental studies students Brandee Knight and Caitlin Schneider, published a paper in “The Southwestern Geographer” titled “On Making and Becoming a Graduate,” a reflection piece about approaches in learning and teaching for better undergraduate education. 

  • Associate Director of University Relations - University Events Xan Koonce was one of five national and international artists featured in the “Color” exhibit which ran Fab. 21 - March 27 at Mary Tomas Gallery in Dallas. Xan is also one of four featured artist at Cerulean Gallery in Amarillo. The “Radius” exhibition took place March 6 - April 18, and a portion of the proceeds from sales benefited the Texas Panhandle Independent Futures Foundation - a non-profit organization helping young adults with physical disabilities to live independent lives.

  • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe was the invited keynote speaker at Texas State University’s symposium titled “Democracy’s Promise: Deisolating Gender Experiences,” on March 27. She discussed her current research on the surveillance of African American men in a liberal predominantly white neighborhood. 

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari collaborated with Austin Symphony Orchestra Music Director Peter Bay on the Austin Civic Orchestra’s annual Pearl Amster Youth Concerto Festival concert on March 28. As ACO Music Director, Ferrari conducted two concerti with the winners of the 2015 concerto contest in addition to Wagner’s Elsa’s Procession to the Cathedral. ACO Assistant Conductor Gus Sterneman ’06 led one of the concerti and performed Rossini’s Barber of Seville overture.

  • Associate Professor of English and Director of National Fellowships and Scholarships David Gaines presented the opening lecture at the Delta Symposium launch of “Professing Dylan” on April 11 in Jonesboro, Ark. He was invited as one of the contributors to a volume about teaching the works and lives of Bob Dylan. The presentation titled “Dylan Days” touched upon his contribution to the volume and the research involved in his forthcoming book “In Dylan Town: A Fan’s Life” (University of Iowa Press, Fall 2015).

  • Director of Special Collections & Archives Kathryn Stallard was awarded a $20,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Texas State Library and Archives to create a Digital Texas Heritage Resource Center. The project is underway and digitized collections may be viewed at the Portal to Texas History. The first collection digitized includes letters from Thomas Falconer, a British citizen caught up the disastrous 1841 Santa Fe Expedition.” http://texashistory.unt.edu/

  • Senior Director of University Relations-Gift & Estate Planning April Hampton Perez ’89 is currently serving as the President of the Planned Giving Council of Central Texas and is Chair of the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) District IV Conference.

  • Librarians Theresa Zelasko and Joan Parks had a poster presentation accepted for the 2015 Texas Library Association Annual Conference in Austin, April 14-17. The poster titled, “Wednesday Night Lights: a Coach, a team, and a Librarian,” will showcase data gathered from SU football players regarding library instruction that Zelasko and Parks provided. The instruction is part of campus outreach efforts provided by Information Services’ Research & Digital Scholarship (RADS) team.

March 2015

  • At the recent International Studies Association meeting, Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin served as discussant for a panel titled “When Peace Meets Resistance: An Exploration Of Theoretical And Empirical Intersections” and chaired another panel titled “Pedagogies Of The ‘International’: Displacement, Emancipation, Reification?” In addition, he co-chaired the annual editorial meeting of the book series he co-edits, “New Millennium Books in International Relations,” and co-chaired the annual meeting of the journal “International Studies Perspectives,” where he is one of two associate editors.

  • Assistant Professor of History Melissa K Byrnes has published an op-ed titled “Racism, not religion, is at the root of European attacks” in the “Austin American Statesman.”  

  • A proposal written by Chinese minors Adrienne Dodd and Hunter Jurgens, along with Assistant Professor of Chinese Patricia Schiaffini, has been accepted by the AsiaNetwork/Freeman Foundation collaborative research program. This proposal is to conduct summer field work and research on environmental issues in Tibetan populated areas in China. As part of the grant, Schiaffini will present at the Asia Network conference in April in St. Louis, Missouri.

  • Associate Professor of Physics Mark Bottorff has had published the observation work he did three years ago on a large international ground and space satellite monitoring project in the “Astrophysical Journal.” Vince Estrada-Carpenter ’13 and Botorff are listed as co-authors on the paper.

  • Professor of Political Science Eric Selbin had his article, “If You’re Not Part of the Solution, You’re Part of the Problem,” published in the “International Feminist Journal of Politics.”

  • Professor of History Thomas McClendon co-authored “The South African Student Exchange Program: Anti-Apartheid Activism in the Era of Constructive Engagement,” published in “The Journal of South African and American Studies, (Jan. 2015).”

  • Professor of Anthropology Melissa Johnson’s article, “Creolized Conservation: A Belizean Creole Community Encounters a Wildlife Sanctuary,” has been published in “Anthropological Quarterly.”

  • Professor of Chemistry Maha Zewail-Foote and Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci have an article currently in press called “Sexual Attractiveness in Male Rats is Associated with Greater Concentration of Major Urinary Proteins Biology of Reproduction.”

  • Alisa Gaunder, professor of political science and dean of the faculty, will have her article, “Quota Nonadoption in Japan: The Role of the Women’s Movement and the Opposition,” published in an upcoming issue of “Politics and Gender.”

  • Professor of Physics Steve Alexander and Curran Johnston ’14 had their article “Naturally Occuring Heavy Radioactive Elements in the Geothermal Microcosm of the Los Azufres (Mexico) Volcanic Complex” published in the “Journal of Environmental Radioactivity.”

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari was interviewed by KMFA radio in regard to Women’s History Month. The classical music station’s focus was on Austin women musicians, and Ferrari spoke about her experiences as a female conductor in what is generally regarded as a “man’s profession.”

  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum’s dissertation research on the discovery of multimodal behavior in complex computer simulations using neuroevolution will be published in two upcoming articles that deal with automatic discovery of intelligent behavior in the classic video game of Ms. Pac-Man. The first, titled “Discovering Multimodal Behavior in Ms. Pac-Man through Evolution of Modular Neural Networks,” is slated to appear in the IEEE Transactions on Computational Intelligence and Artificial Intelligence in Games later this year. The second, titled “Solving Interleaved and Blended Sequential Decision-Making Problems through Modular Neuroevolution,” will appear in the Proceedings of the Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference after being presented at the conference this July in Madrid, Spain. 

  • At the March meeting of the American Physical Society in San Antonio, Professor of Physics Steven Alexander gave a talk titled “Calculating Properties of Finite Mass Atoms.”

  • Professor of Religion Elaine Craddock received a Fulbright grant to fund her research on transgender communities and Hindu temples in Tamil Nadu, India, during her spring 2016 sabbatical.

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, was recently awarded a $27,691 grant from the Williamson County Conservation Foundation to carry out research on the ecology of the Georgetown salamander. In the past five years, Pierce has received a total of $131,557 for his research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, was invited to give a reading from her book “Feminist Queer Crip” at New York University on February 25, 2015. While on the campus, she met with graduate students to discuss their work.

  • Phil Hopkins, professor of philosophy, published a book, “Mass Moralizing: Marketing and Moral Storytelling,” with Lexington Books (an academic imprint of Rowman & Littlefield) in March.

  • The Southwestern women’s basketball team won the 2015 SCAC Championship; they will now go on to play in the 64 team Division III National Tournament beginning March 6. Head Coach Kerri Brinkoeter also was named SCAC Coach of the Year. 

February 2015

  • Dr. Patrick Hajovsky co-hosted a panel with Dr. Kimberly Jones, Ellen and Harry S. Parker III Assistant Curator of the Arts of the Americas, at the College Art Association in New York on February 13. The title of the panel was “Divine Impersonators: Substance and Presence of Pre-Columbian Embodiment.” Read more.

  • Therese Shelton, associate professor of math, will be presented with The Ron Barnes Distinguished Service to Students Award by the Texas section of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) at their April 2015 Meeting. The award represents both a teacher’s commitment to students and the respect from the teacher’s peers. For more than 20 years, Shelton has been preparing students to give math presentations, including seven recent national presentations, one of which won a national award. 

  • Professor of Music Lois Ferrari and the Austin Civic Orchestra performed a concert of Russian music in the Alma Thomas Theater on February 7. Featured were Assistant Professor of Music Hai Zheng on cello and ACO’s new assistant conductor Gus Sterneman ’06. Professors Emeriti Ellsworth Peterson and Bob Horick gave a pre-concert talk on the program’s main work, Symphony No. 5 by Dmitri Shostakovich.

  • On January 26, Assistant Professor of Computer Science Jacob Schrum presented his research at an event held in conjunction with the 29th annual conference of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence. His interactive demo, “BotPrize 2012 Champion: A Human-like Bot for Unreal Tournament,” allowed participants to play the game Unreal Tournament 2004 while trying to determine which opponent was human-controlled, and which was Schrum’s software bot that had previously won an international competition by fooling human judges into thinking it was human. 

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, delivered the annual School of Interdisciplinary Studies Distinguished Lecture at the University of Toledo on February 19. She was invited to speak about her book Feminist, Queer, Crip (Indiana University Press, 2013). 

  • Professor of Psychology Traci Giuliano co-authored two articles (with alumni Kevin Hutzler, Sarah Johnson and Jordan Herselman) that were recently accepted for publication in the journal Psychology & Sexuality: “Three’s a crowd: Public awareness and (mis)perceptions of polyamory” and “Development of a brief measure of attitudes towards polyamory.”

  • Joshua Long, assistant professor of environmental studies, authored an article titled “Constructing the narrative of the sustainability fix: Sustainability, social justice and representation in Austin, TX,” that appeared in the journal Urban Studies. He was also was interviewed Computerworld for a story about the changing landscape of Information Technology employment in Austin and the Southwest, and by the European News magazine Der Spiegel for an article that explores Austin’s commitment to green energy and electric cars.

  • Assistant Professor of Music and Artist in Residence Hai Zheng-Olefsky has been invited to perform her 5th Asia concert tour. She will bring her long time pianist Kiyoshi Tamagawa, associate dean of the Sarofim School of Fine Arts and professor of music, to celebrate their 20th season performing together. They will give one master class and two concerts in Bangkok at Siam Ratchada Music School Auditorium on March 12, and at Hua Hin’s Hyatt Regency in Thailand on March 13; one master class and one concert at Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music at National University of Singapore on March 17 and 18. They will finish their concert tour with one master class and one recital at the China Conservatory in Beijing on March 19 and 20.

  • Associate Professor of Communication Studies Davi Thornton’s article “Transformations of the Ideal Mother: The Story of Mommy Economicus and Her Amazing Brain” was published in Women’s Studies in Communication 37(3) 2014. In addition, this article was awarded the Top Article Award of 2014 by the Organization for Research on Women and Communication. 

  • Associate Professor of Art History Patrick Hajovsky was selected to be on the editorial board for the Grove Encyclopedia of Latin American Art and Architecture, which will be part of the Oxford Art Online project and will appear as finished print 3-volume printed set with approximately 1350 entries.

  • Professor of Sociology and University Scholar Edward L. Kain co-authored an article titled, “The Coordinated Curriculum: How Institutional Theory Can Be Used to Catalyze Revision of the Sociology Major,” with Stephen Sweet and Kevin McElrath of Ithaca College, which was published in the October 2014 issue of “Teaching Sociology.”

  • In January, 2015, the annual Joint Mathematics Meetings were held in San Antonio. At the conference, Associate Professor of Computer Science Barbara Anthony gave a talk titled “Complete r-partite graphs determined by their domination polynomial” in the MAA General Contributed Paper Session on Research in Graph Theory.

    Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura gave a talk titled “Harmonic ratios: music and art in an inquiry-based Geometry course” in the MAA Session on Mathematics and the Arts.

    Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr gave a talk titled “Some recent results on magic-type labelings of directed graphs” in the Pure and Applied Talks by Women Math Warriors presented by EDGE (Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education) session. Professor of Mathematics Kendall Richards gave a talk titled “On the Modulus of the Grotzsch Ring” in the AMS Special Session on Inequalities and Quantitative Approximation.

    Associate Professor of Mathematics Therese Shelton gave a talk titled “POGIL Flu for Calculus: Influenza Data to Help Students Investigate Antiderivatives, Accumulations, and FTC” in the MAA Session on Inquiry-Based Learning in First-Year and Second-Year Courses. Marr and Shelton also gave a talk titled “Working to Improve Student Success in Calculus I Through Pre-calculus Support” in the MAA General Contributed Paper Session on Research in Teaching or Learning Calculus.

    Southwestern student, Matthew Miller, presented a poster titled “Scoring Cardiac Health: A Model of the Relationship between Diet and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease” in the undergraduate poster session. Southwestern student Robert Lehr and President Edward Burger also attended the meeting.

January 2015

  • Michael Seanger, professor of English, was interviewed by McGill-Queens University Press about his new collection of essays that explore the hybridity of languages that Shakespeare embraced in his writing.

  • Allison R. Miller, assistant professor of art history, gave an invited lecture on January 8 at Palacký University in Olomouc, Czech Republic. The talk titled, “A Retreat from Naturalism: Re-thinking the Terracotta Warriors of the Han” was financed with funds from the European Social Fund and the Czech Ministry of Education.

  • Assistant Professor of Religion Molly Hadley Jensen wrote an article, “Cultivating a Sense of Place in Religious Studies,” for the January issue of “Teaching Theology and Religion.”   

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, published “Keeping the Sabbath Post-Hyper Cacher” in Lilith Blog. 

  • Assistant Professor of Psychology Erin Crockett co-authored “Facebook official: Using the Overlap in Facebook Profiles to Predict Relationship Outcomes,” which has been accepted for publication in the “Journal of Social Psychology.” 

  • Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci presented at the Williamson Museum Salon monthly meeting in January 2015, “Let’s Talk about Sex.”

  • Professor of Psychology Fay Guarraci, Professor of Chemistry Maha Zewail-Foote, and a group of scientists in Singapore have a new manuscript accepted for publication in the journal, “Biology of Reproduction.” 

  • Michael Cooper, professor of music and Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts, published a chapter titled “Music History as Sermon: Style, Form, and Narrative in Mendelssohn’s ‘Dürer’ Cantata (1828)” in the book “Mendelssohn, the Organ, and the Music of the Past: Constructing Historical Legacies”

  • Instructor of Environmental Studies M. Anwar Sounny-Slitine presented at the American Geophysical Union annual meeting in San Francisco about current research on remote sensing and GIS database development in defining Alluvial Megafan, or large fan-shaped bodies of sediment that form from lateral migrations of a river as it exits a topographic front. He has also co-authored an article published in the Journal of Geography titled “The Use of Web-Based Video for Instruction of GIS and Other Digital Geographic Methods,” in which he highlights the benefits and limitations of Web-based video in GIS labs, and how these teaching tools can be used to “flip” classrooms.

    He also presented a current faculty-student research project at the 2014 Williamson County GIS Day, an event about the practice of GIS, where users and vendors open their doors to schools, businesses, and the general public to showcase real-world applications and research. The talk, co-authored with Southwestern students Brandee Knight, Dakota McDurham, and Jen O’Neal, was titled “The Effects of Virtual Environments on Spatial Thinking,” and outlined virtual environments, or reconstructions of reality in 3D GIS platforms like Google Maps Streetview. They presented results of a experiment with grade school children who explored Southwestern campus virtually and physical and then tested for understanding of place and navigation of campus. Results were also presented at the 2014 annual meeting of the Southwestern Association of American Geographer in Albuquerque, NM.

  • Kimberly Smith, professor of art history, edited a critical anthology titled, “The Expressionist Turn in Art History,” published by Ashgate in December 2014. Smith’s anthology includes a cross-section of art history texts from the early 20th century that have been described as expressionist, along with critical commentaries by an international group of scholars. Translated here from the German for the first time, these examples of an expressionist turn in art history, along with their secondary analyses and Smith’s substantial introduction, offer a productive lens through which to re-examine the practice and theory of art history in the early 20th century. http://www.ashgate.com/isbn/9781409449997

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Alison Marr was recently invited to deliver two talks in India. The first, delivered on Dec. 2 at Manonmaniam Sundaranar University in Tirunelveli, India, was part of the 10th Annual Professor S. Arumugam Endowment Seminar on Graph Theory, and was titled “Three of my favorite graph theory questions.” The second was given on Dec. 4 at Kalasalingam University as part of the 8th International Workshop on Graph Labeling. It was titled “Sparse semi-magic squares and labelings of directed graphs.”  

December 2014

  • Barbara Anthony, associate professor of computer science, published a paper on “The Power of Rejection in Online Bottleneck Matching,” co-authored with Christine Chung (Connecticut College), in Springer’s Lecture Notes in Computer Science series. The paper was presented at the 8th Annual International Conference on Combinatorial Optimization and Applications (COCOA 2014). 

  • Charlotte Nunes, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Scholarship in the Department of Research and Digital Scholarship, spoke on a panel discussing “Archives and Digital Humanities” at the Coalition for Networked Information in Washington, D.C. December 8-10. Nunes discussed her role as an intermediary between the library and academic departments for the Latina History Project, co-directed by Assistant Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo and Associate Professor of Feminist Studies Alison Kafer.

  • Assistant Professor of Economics Patrick Van Horn had a research article titled, “Did the Reserve Requirement Increases of 1936-1937 Reduce Bank Lending? Evidence from a Quasi-Experiment” (coauthored with Haelim Park) accepted for publication at Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking.

  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Applied Music Jessica Gilliam-Valls was invited to perform at the 2015 International Society of Bassists Convention, at the University of Colorado at Ft. Collins, June 1-6. She will also be presenting at the Vivo el Bajo! South Texas Bass Symposium, Feburary 27-March 1, 2015.

  • Flute instructor Adrienne Inglis toured with Chaski to Hot Springs, Ark., November 20-23, to perform Latin American folk music as well as two of Inglis’ compositions. Chaski and the Hot Springs Music Festival Chorus, under the direction of Lynn Payette, presented the Arkansas premiere performances of Inglis’ “Misa trinitaria” and “In Heaven and on Earth” and received a standing ovation.

  • Part-time Assistant Professor of Chinese Patricia Schiaffini presented a paper on filmmaker and writer from Tibet, Pema Taeden, from Hong Kong Baptist University.

  • Associate Professor of Mathematics Fumiko Futamura celebrated Albrecht Dürer’s mathematical and artistic prowess for the 500th anniversary of his etching, St. Jerome in his Study, in the November issue of “Math Horizons.” Her article, titled “Dürer: Disguise, Distance, Disagreements, and Diagonals!” was co-written with Annalisa Crannell and Marc Frantz and mathematically analyzes Dürer’s perspective drawing.

  • Assistant Professor of History Melissa Byrnes served as discussant for a panel titled “Contested Visions of Metropole and Colony: From France to French West Africa in the 20th Century” at the Western Society for French History’s Annual Conference in San Antonio this November. She also chaired a panel, “Conquering Science and the Science of Conquest.”

  • Professor of Sociology Maria Lowe, Assistant Professor of Sociology Reggie Byron and Sue Mennicke, associate dean for international programs at Franklin and Marshall College published an article titled, “The Racialized Impact of Study Abroad on U.S. Students’ Subsequent Interracial Interactions,” in “Education Research International,” (Dec. 2014), doi:10.1155/2014/232687. This project was carried out with funds from Associated Colleges of the South Faculty Mellon Grant awarded to Lowe, Byron and Mennicke.

  • Associate Professor of German Erika Berroth presented her research on eco-pedagogy as feminist praxis at the annual convention of the American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages / American Association of Teachers of German in San Antonio, Texas, November 20-23. Berroth mentored Lauren Brooks, Ph.D. candidate at Pennsylvania State University in co-organizing the conference panel, which was sponsored by the Coalition of women in German, and invited her to present her dissertation research on connections of Kafka and Seinfeld to students of German at Southwestern University.

  • Part-Time Assistant Professor of Music Dana Zenobi presented a lecture titled “Funding Strategies for Performers” at the 2014 Texoma regional conference of the National Association of Teachers of Singing. Zenobi was one of nine artists selected from the Texas/Oklahoma/New Mexico region this year. 

     

  • Associate Professor of Biology Maria Cuevas and Tracey Lindeman ’09 published an article in the January 2015 issue of the journal “Oncology Reports.” The article, titled “In vitro cytotoxicity of 4’OH-tamoxifen and estradiol in human endometrial adenocarcinoma cells HEC-1A and HEC-1B.

  • Professor of English Eileen Cleere has published a review essay titled “Relations” in “Victorian Review: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Victorian Studies.” The essay reviews three new books in Victorian family studies in the context of ongoing scholarly conversations in the field.

  • Receiving Sam Taylor Fellowship awards from the Division of Higher Education of the Board of Higher Education and Ministry of the United Methodist Church this year were Associate Professor of Music David Asbury, Professor of English Eileen Cleere, Professor of Biology Maria Cuevas and Instructor of Environmental Studies Anwar Sounny-Slitine

  • Professor of Music Kiyoshi Tamagawa performed with the Austin Symphony Orchestra in two subscription concerts at the Long Center in Austin on Nov. 21 and 22. He played the Piano Concerto in C major, K. 503, by Mozart as part of “A Night with Mozart and Schubert,” and participated in pre-concert lectures on KMFA before each performance.

  • Southwestern Jazz Band Director David Guidi was recently selected to serve as the director for the TMEA Region 26 Honors Jazz Band. The ensemble made up of public school students selected through an intensive audition process, performed at East View High School in Georgetown on December 13.

  • Desiderio Roybal, Associate Professor of Theatre, designed the stage scenery for the play, “Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Jersey Lily” at the Austin Playhouse in Austin Texas. The show runs November 21 through December 21, 2014. He is also designing the stage scenery for “She Stoops to Conquer” at the Austin Playhouse in Austin, Texas. The show runs February 13 through March 15, 2015. 

November 2014

  • Associate Professor of English David Gaines had his article “Tangled Up in Bob,” published in “The Chronicle of Higher Ed” on Nov. 24, 2014. 

  • Associate Professor of English Michael Saenger had a short article accepted in “Notes and Queries” (published by Oxford University Press) on the connection between Shakespeare’s “The Winter’s Tale” and one of Shakespeare’s contemporaries, Thomas Nashe. The piece is a condensed version of Saenger’s keynote lecture at a conference held at the University of London last summer. In addition, Saenger wrote a review of an Austin production of “Antony and Cleopatra,” directed by Joseph Falocco, that was accepted for publication in “Texas Theatre Journal.”

  • Professor of Chemistry Emily Niemeyer and Patrick Flanigan ’13 published an article in the December 2014 issue of the journal “Food Chemistry.” The article, titled “Effect of cultivar on phenolic levels, anthocyanin composition, and antioxidant properties in purple basil (Ocimum basilicum L.)”, was based on Flanigan’s chemistry honors project research.

  • Professor of Religion Laura Hobgood-Oster was one of the guests on HuffPost Live on Nov. 13. 2014

  • Professor of Art Victoria Star Varner presented five prints at the “Midwest Matrix Continuum,” conference and exhibition celebrating some of the most influential printmakers since mid-century in the field of fine art printmaking and their influence on programs around the nation. The exhibit was held at the Grunwald Gallery in the School of Fine Arts at Indiana University, Bloomington, and was on view August 29 – October 1. 

  • Abby Dings, associate professor of Spanish, had an article published in the fall 2014 edition of “Modern Language Journal.” The article, “Interactional Competence and the Development of Alignment Activity,” draws from research conducted on second language learners in the study abroad setting. Dings also had an article published in the fall 2014 edition of “Foreign Language Annals.” The article, co-authored with Tammy Jandrey Hertel of Lynchburg College, is titled “The Undergraduate Spanish Major Curriculum: Realities and Faculty Perceptions” and presents quantitative and qualitative results of a nationwide survey of Spanish department faculty on the undergraduate Spanish major curriculum. 

  • Assistant Professor of Anthropology Brenda Sendejo was invited to do a reading of her recent publication, “Methodologies of the Spirit: Reclaiming Our Lady of Guadalupe and Discovering Tonantzin Within and Beyond the Nepantla of Academia” published in the anthology, “Fleshing the Spirit: Spirituality and Activism in Chicana, Latina, and Indigenous Women’s Lives.” The reading took place on Nov. 22 at 2 p.m. at Alma de Mujer Center for Social Change in Austin.

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, published “Tribal Television: Viewing Native People in Sitcoms.“ 

October 2014

  • Associate Professors of Biology Maria Todd and Maria Cuevas were awarded $10,000 from the JP Morgan Crump Foundation to support their collaborative cancer research project with Associate Professor of Biology Rebecca Sheller. The aim of the project is to study the deregulation of tight junction proteins in female reproductive cancers. 

  • On Nov. 14, President Edward Burger will speak and participate in a panel discussion at a Texas STEM summit, “Harnessing Human Energy for STEM Success,” sponsored by Chevron. Only President Burger and two other academics - from Rice University and the Rochester Institute of Technology - were chosen to speak to this important topic.

  • Professor of Art History Thomas Howe spoke on Oct. 31 in St. Petersburg, Russia, on master planning a major archaeological park. He was a principal speaker at an international conference hosted by and at the Hermitage State Museums and the University of St. Petersburg. His talk is titled, “Actual Problems of Art History and Theory” and presented the approach which he developed in shaping and executing the Master Plan of the large Stabiae archaeological site near Pompeii, one of the largest planned archaeological projects of modern Europe. His presentation of this active project will be the principle topic of discussion at this conference on the theories of planning and presenting archaeological sites. 

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, presented “Post-Holocaust Jewish Geography: Enemies, A Love Story” at the 2014 Film and History conference, held in Madison, WI.

  • Stephen Marble, associate professor of education and Michael Kamen, professor of education, presented at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland, on Oct. 30. 

  • On Oct. 23 and 24 Professor of Art History Thomas Howe gave lectures for the third consecutive year on the Archaeological Institute of America National Lecture Tour to the AIA Societies of Eugene and Portland Oregon. He will again be presenting the results of recent excavations and studies on his site of the large Roman villas of Stabiae near Pompeii. 

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, delivered a talk titled, “The Linguistic Materiality of Perspective in The Spanish Tragedy,” at the Sixteenth Century Studies Conference in New Orleans, October 19, 2014. He was also an invited chair of the panel, “Dramatic Tragedy in 16th-century England,” and the organizer of “Theater of Perspective in the Renaissance” at the same conference.

  • In May, Thomas Howe, professor of art history and coordinator general of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation in Italy, delivered a book-length manuscript of the publication of one of the most important ancient Roman gardens ever found - the Villa Arianna of Stabiae.

    Howe assumed personal direction of the excavation from 2007 to 2010 and study afterward, and worked with more than a dozen authors and specialists to produce a model interdisciplinary study of the first garden to provide archaeological proof of the kind of “fictive thicket” garden, long known through the famous garden fresco of the Villa of the Empress Livia at Prima Porta outside Rome (pictured). The volume will be published as a monograph in the Quaderni of the Rivista di Studi Pompeiani, both in Italian and English. 

  • Thomas Howe, professor of art history, recently delivered the manuscript of an article he contributed to the “Festschrift” (honorary volume) to be delivered upon the retirement of the long-serving restoration architect of the Parthenon in Athens Greece, Monolis Korres, who retired in June 2016.

    In the article, Howe makes the bold argument that the first real architects did not rise from the building professions, but were imposed on it from a class of men just like the first philosophers: self-taught “gentlemen” polymaths, who traveled to Egypt and were experienced in politics, war, applied geometry and work-crew management. This was the beginning of the first true “liberal arts” training (called “paideia”) for creative professionals. 

  • The Austin Civic Orchestra and its Music Director, Lois Ferrari, both finished as finalists in the 2014 American Prize national competition. Both orchestra and conductor competed on a national scale in the civic orchestra division by submitting both video and audio recordings of recent performances. The ACO has within its ranks nine members with SU connections, either as alumni, current students or faculty.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German, presented research on transnational and multicultural European film at the 71st Annual South Central Modern Languages Association Conference in Austin, Texas, on Oct. 20, 2014. Showcasing her curricular innovations in the German program at the 39th conference of the Coalition of Women in German in Shawnee on Delaware, PA, Oct. 23-26, 2014, she spoke on “Teaching German in the Anthropocene” on the Pedagogy Panel titled Sustainability as Feminist Practice.

    Her poster presentation “Innovations in a Small German Program” highlighted the impact of an ACS Blended Learning Grant in the development of our new short-term embedded study abroad program for student-athletes: Global Players: Leadership, Football, Intercultural Learning, first implemented this summer. Berroth also organized and chaired the session “Feminist Embodiment and Empowerment,” and, as Chair of the 2014 WIG Dissertation Prize Committee, introduced and honored this year’s winner.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and Lucy King Brown Chair, published (2014) “If You’re Not Part of the Solution, You’re Part of the Problem,” in the International Feminist Journal of Politics, 16(3).

  • Barbara Anthony, associate professor of computer science, and Natalia Rodriguez, senior computer science major, attended the 2014 Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing in Phoenix, Arizona. Both were awarded funding to attend (an Anita Borg Institute Faculty scholarship, and a GHC Scholarship grant). At the conference, Anthony was a judge in the Association for Computing Machinery Student Research Competition.

  • Flutist and flute instructor Adrienne Inglis, with mezzo-soprano Shaunna Shandro and harpist Shana Norton, performed the American premiere of three works by British composer Rosemary Duxbury on May 4, 2014, in Austin, Texas: The Nightingale, Songs of the Mysterious, and The Dawn Princess. The world premiere of Inglis’ composition, In Heaven and on Earth for SATB chorus, flute, and lever harp, was presented September 28, 2014, by the Westminster Presbyterian Church Sanctuary Choir with director Rick Colvin, flutist Adrienne Inglis, and harpist Norton, in Austin, Texas.

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, contributed the essays on Henry David Thoreau as well as Ralph Waldo Emerson for The Encyclopedia of Political Thought, published by Wiley Blackwell Press. The essays provide the political significance of each thinker’s writings, scholarly approaches and current research, as well as biographical information. The Encyclopedia of Political Thought assembles experts in the field to analyze key topics, themes, and theorists in the history of political thought, contemporary political theory, and political philosophy. 

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, published “Jewish Calendar Talk” in Lilith Blog.

  • In the summer of 2014 Professor of Art History Thomas Howe, for the fourth year, lead a team of architecture students in developing a system of high-precision 3D recording of upstanding ancient architecture using reflectorless theodolite and CAD. The CAD processing was done by advanced students and alumni of the School of Architecture, Preservation and Planning of the University of Maryland; students from SU participated in 2012 and 2013 (Katy Nave ’15 and Chandler Johnson ’15). 

September 2014

  • Kimberly Smith, professor of art history, gave a talk entitled “Maria Marc’s Letters” at the conference “Crossing Borders: Marianne Werefkin and the Cosmopolitan Women Artists in Her Circle.” This international conference took place on September 11-12, 2014 at the Paula Modersohn-Becker Museum in Bremen, Germany, and was held in cooperation with Jacobs University, Bremen. Maria Marc is little known even in German art history, and even less so in Anglo-American scholarship. Smith’s talk addressed Maria Marc’s writing, from letters to provenance notes, as a generative act that should be considered crucial to our understanding of Blaue Reiter Expressionism. 

  • Laura Hobgood-Oster, professor of religion and environmental studies, had an article titled “Dog Eat Dog World” published in the July issue of Crufts magazine.

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, has published her second book. The book, titled The Sanitary Arts: Aesthetic Culture and the Victorian Cleanliness Campaigns, was released by Ohio State University Press in late July. Read more here.

  • Reginald Byron, assistant professor of sociology, and Maria Lowe, professor of sociology, presented a paper titled “Performativity Double Standards and the Sexual Orientation Climate at a Southern Liberal Arts University” at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association in San Francisco Aug. 16-19. Recent graduates Brianna Billingsley and Nathan Tuttle were co-authors of the paper. Lowe and Angela Stroud, a 2003 graduate who is now an assistant professor of sociology and social justice at Northland College, also presented a paper titled “‘Suspicious Person or Neighbor?’: Heightened Surveillance of Black Men on a Predominantly White Neighborhood Listserv.” Recent graduate Alice Nguyen was a co-author of the paper. Billingsley participated in the ASA Honors Program and presented a paper from her 2013 sociology capstone research that won first place in the undergraduate paper competition sponsored by Alpha Kappa Delta, the sociology honor society. Billingsley received a $500 cash award for winning the national paper prize, along with $1,000 in travel funds to present her research at the meeting, and an opportunity to submit her research for publication in the peer-reviewed journal Sociological Inquiry.

  • An article by Fred Sellers, associate professor emeritus of business, has been published in volume 14(2) of theJournal of Accounting and Finance. The article is titled “Dynegy Corporation: Inflating Operating Cash Flow.”

  • Rick Roemer, professor of theatre, has been hired as a guest artist actor for the regional premiere of “Love and Information,” which will be performed at St. Edward’s University Sept. 25-Oct. 5. The play, which was written by Caryl Churchill, just had a smash hit run at the highly acclaimed New York Theatre Workshop. Read more here.

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, published an article titled “The Unmarked Chains of Paper Clips” in the spring issue of Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies. The essay discusses the 2004 documentary made about the Children’s Holocaust Memorial in Whitwell, Tenn., and, more broadly, Holocaust education in the 21st century. Read the article here.

  • Fay Guaracci, professor of psychology, has an article in the September issue of Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior. The article, titled “Endocannabinoid influence on partner preference in female rats,” was co-authored by 2014 graduates Nicoletta MemosRebekah Vela and Courtney Tabone.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German, has been selected to participate in a faculty seminar on Meeting Student Needs in College German Programs that will be held at Georgetown University Oct. 10-12. The seminar is sponsored by the American Association of Teachers of German and made possible through funding from Netzwerk Deutsch of the Sonderprogramm zur Förderung von Deutsch in USA und Kanada. Only 28 participants were selected to attend the seminar. Read more here.

September 2014

  • Jessica Hower, assistant professor of history, won the 2014 Wm. Roger Louis Prize, which is awarded annually to the author of the best paper delivered at the annual international Britain and the World Conference. This year’s conference was held June 19-21 at Newcastle University in England and Hower presented a paper titled “Under One (Inherited) Imperial Crown: The Tudor Origins of Britain and its Empire, 1603-1625.” The prize is worth $1,000 and entitles the winners to publication of their articles in a future issue of Britain and the World: Historical Journal of The British Scholar Society, which is published by Edinburgh University Press. 

  • Erin Crockett, assistant professor of psychology, co-authored an article titled “LifeWorks Resolution Counseling Program: The effectiveness of a non-punitive violence rehabilitation program” that has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Family Violence.

  • Barbara Anthony, associate professor of computer science, attended the POGIL (Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning) Southwest Regional 3-Day Workshop in Colorado Springs, Colo., in July. As part of the workshop, she presented a poster on “Community-Engaged Projects in Operations Research,” which was based on the four projects done by students in her Spring 2014 class.

  • Four faculty members have been selected to be Community-Engaged Learning Fellows for the 2014-2015 academic year and will receive special mentoring from the Office of Civic Engagement on how to integrate community-engaged learning into their classes. The new fellows are Erin Crockett, assistant professor of psychology; Abby Dings, associate professor of Spanish; Katherine Prater, assistant professor of education; and Carl Robertson, associate professor of Chinese. Read more about the program here.

  • Mary Visser, professor of art and holder of the Herman Brown Chair, had two new sculptural works 3-D printed by The University of Texas for the 2014 International Digital Sculpture Exhibition, which was held at UT-Austin in August. Read more about the exhibition here

  • Kiyoshi Tamagawa, professor of music, presented a session titled “Playing Together: Chamber Music for Beginning and Intermediate-Level Pianists” at the annual convention of the Texas Music Teachers’ Association, which was held in Houston June 16-19.

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, was the first keynote speaker at a conference on Adapting, Performing and Reviewing Shakespearean Comedy in a European Context that was held at Kings College, London, June 12-13. Listen to a podcast of his talk here. Saenger also published two reviews on the Reviewing Shakespeare website, which is maintained by the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and the University of Warwick. Read his review of  Twelfth Night as performed by The City Theatre in Austin here. Read his review of All’s Well That Ends Well as performed by the 7 Towers Theater Company of Austin here. Saenger also has been given a blog by The Times of Israel. His first published piece, “The Shylock Lens: Shakespeare and the Myth of Jewish Brutality,” was published on July 21. Read the piece here.

  • Gulnar Rawji, associate professor of chemistry, published an article earlier this year that was co-authored by two former Southwestern students and a colleague at UT-Austin. The paper is titled “An acetonitrile solvatomorph of dichlorido(1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-d​ione)platinum(II) and was published in the journal Acta Crystallographic. The Southwestern graduates who were co-authors on the paper are Amanda H​amala and Carissa Fritz.

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, published an article in Herpetological Conservation and Biology titled “Population size, movement, and reproduction of the Georgetown salamander,Eurycea naufragia.” The paper was co-authored with 2013 graduate Kira McEntire and 2012 graduate Ashley Wall.

  • President Edward Burger was the guest speaker for the Texas Leadership Forum in May. In July, President Burger spoke to high school students attending the Honors Summer Math Camp at Texas State University and to students attending the Phi Theta Kappa Texas Honors Institute, which was held at Southwestern. He also delivered the keynote address at a July 29 event honoring teachers who participated in the Texas Regional Collaboratives for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Teaching and spoke to groups of educators in Michigan and Florida.

  • Five faculty members from Southwestern participated in the annual meeting of the Association for Environmental Studies and Sciences that was held at Pace University in New York June 11-14. The theme for the conference was “Welcome to the Anthropocene: From Global Challenge to Planetary Stewardship.” Faculty members Erika BerrothLaura Hobgood-OsterMelissa Johnson and Emily Northrop participated in a panel titled “Collaboration in Teaching the Anthropocene Across Disciplines.” Berroth presented a paper titled “Shades of Green: Reflection on the Role of Modern Languages and Literature Programs within Environmental Humanities and the Anthropocene Studies.” Hobgood-Oster presented a paper titled “How Does the Anthropocene Fit into a Religion Classroom?” Johnson presented a paper titled  “Reframing an Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Course around the Anthropocene.” Northrop presented a paper titled “The Competing Goals of Economic Growth and Climate Stability in the Introductory Economics Course.” Molly Jensen, assistant professor of religion, introduced conference participants to Southwestern’s new Paideia Cluster on The Anthropocene and presented a paper at the meeting titled “Cultivating a Sense of Place in a Religious Studies Course: Teaching for Ecological Care.”

  • Three faculty members from Southwestern attended the 17th annual Mediterranean Studies Congress held May 28-31 at the University of Malaga in Marbella, Spain. Melissa Byrnes, assistant professor of history, presented a paper titled “Ramadan on the Rhone: Muslims and Christians in Secular France.” Sergio Costola, associate professor of theatre, presented a paper titled “London’s Venice and Shylock’s Rialto” and Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, presented a paper titled “Mediterranean Mishpocha: The 2010-14 Uprising(s) of the Mediterranean Peoples.”

  • Lois Ferrari, professor of music, is a finalist for the 2014 American Prize in Community Orchestra Conductingand the Austin Civic Orchestra, which she conducts, is a finalist in the Community Orchestra Performance category. Dana Zenobi, assistant professor of applied music, is a finalist in the Professional Art Song division, and senior Melissa Krueger is a finalist in the College/University Opera division.

May 2014

  • Eileen Meyer Russell, associate professor of music, presented two recitals with Don McManus, organist at Grace Episcopal Church in Georgetown. The recitals were in Lufkin, Texas, at St. Cyprian’s Church, and in Georgetown at Grace Episcopal Church. Both recitals featured Meyer Russell on alto and tenor trombones and euphonium. The repertoire included several original arrangements created by Meyer Russell and McManus. In addition, Meyer Russell presented two recitals by invitation from the Georgetown Symphony Society as part of the GISD Music Enrichment Program. More than 1,600 students attended the recitals, which were presented at the Klett Center for the Performing Arts. Meyer Russell collaborated with Southwestern faculty members Kiyoshi Tamagawa and Kyle Koronka on these recitals, as well as Round Rock Symphony member Reese Farnell. 

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology, served as the scientific advisor for an Eagle Scout project that earned a Texas Environmental Excellence Award from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. Pierce advised high school student Connor Crowe on how he could help restore Georgetown Salamander habitat around Twin Springs Preserve, which was damaged by a storm in September 2010. A video about the project can be seen here. The research that Pierce and Southwestern students and have been doing on the Georgetown Salamander was mentioned at the May 7 award presentation.

  • The Austin Civic Orchestra premiered a new composition by Jason Hoogerhyde, associate professor of music, during an April 26 concert on The University of Texas campus. The piece is titled “A Quiet Constellation.” Lois Ferrari, professor of music, conducted the orchestra and students Mattie Kotzur and Michael Martinez performed with the orchestra on this program.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, published an invited article titled “Revolution: a Source of Insecurity and a Thing of the Past?” on the International Relations and Security Network (ISN) website. The article, which can be read here, is part of an analysis of whether revolutions are a thing of the past and today represent sources of insecurity and disorder. The ISN is a project of the Center for Security Studies at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) jointly funded by the Swiss Federal Department of Defence, Civil Protection and Sport (DDPS) and ETH Zurich. (Note: “The views expressed in this piece are his own. The ISN does not endorse the opinions of any individual or institution, other than those expressed by an ISN staff member acting in an official capacity.”)

  • Alisa Gaunder, professor of political science, presented a paper titled “Quota Non-Adoption in Japan: The Role of Party Competition and the Women’s Movement” at the Associated Colleges of the South Gender Studies Conference at Furman University April 4. Gaunder also was the chair and discussant of a panel titled “Populism, Leadership, and Institutions” at the Western Political Science Association Meeting in Seattle, Wash., April 17-20. 

  • Omar Rivera, assistant professor of philosophy and chair of the Race and Ethnicity Studies Minor, presented a paper titled “Cataclysmic Potency in Inka Stonework” as part of the Mike Ryan Lecture Series in Philosophy at Kennesaw State University in Atlanta, Ga., April 24.

April 2014

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, has been invited by the National Endowment for the Humanities to serve as a reviewer in its Digital Humanities Implementation Grants program in Washington, D.C. Tahmahkera will review proposals for the use of innovative technologies in indigenous communities and sound studies.

  • Josh Long, assistant professor of environmental studies, presented a paper at the Association of American Geographers conference that was held in Tampa, Fla., April 8-12. His paper was titled “Smart Growth and the Neoliberal Sustainability Narrative: The Case of Austin.”

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, co-edited a special issue of Disability Studies Quarterly with Michelle Jarman from the University of Wyoming. The issue, titled “Growing Disability Studies: Politics of Access, Politics of Collaboration,” features 12 essays on the future of the field from undergraduates, graduate students, faculty and independent scholars. The table of contents is available here and Jarman and Kafer’s introduction is available here.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, was an invited participant on a “Race and the Cold War” State of the Field round table session at the Organization of American Historians conference in Atlanta April 11. The session was one of only seven State of the Field panels at the conference, which was attended by thousands of historians.

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, gave an invited lecture titled “Reel and Novel Jews: A Feminist and Queer Renaissance” at Vassar April 3. Read more here.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, spoke to the United States Embassies in Armenia, Azerbaijan and Ukraine about “The Power of Story and Social Change” as part of the U.S. State Department Virtual Lecture Series. 

  • Emily Northrop, associate professor of economics, presented a paper titled “Promoting Economic Growth and Climate Change in ECON 100” at a meeting of the Association for Institutionalist Thought, which met under the auspices of the Western Social Science Association Annual Conference held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, April 2-5.

  • Thomas Howe, professor of art history, was the lead presenter at a lecture titled “The Rebirth of a Roman Luxury Resort: Recent Archaeological Discoveries at The Seaside Villas at Stabia”that was held at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia April 8. The lecture was held in conjunction with the institute’s exhibit titled “One Day in Pompeii,” which runs through April 27. Read more here.

  • Mary Visser, professor of art and holder of the Herman Brown Chair, has work in the exhibition “Momentum: Women/Art/Technology,” which will be on display at Arizona State University’s Night Gallery April 4-27. The exhibit features the work of 20 contemporary women artists and is being held in conjunction with Momentum: Women/Art/Technology, a global community of women who embrace technology as their mode of expression.

  • Bob Snyder, professor of political science, presented two papers, “The Arab Uprising and the Persistence of Monarchy” and “Ideology and International Conflict” at the International Studies Association’s annual conference in Toronto last week. He also participated on a roundtable that discussed the book Lessons from the Northern Ireland Peace Process, in which he has a chapter.

  • Laura Senio Blair, associate professor of Spanish, has earned a place in the 2014 NEH Summer Seminar on Jewish Buenos Aires, to be held in Buenos Aires between July 7-24. The seminar will focus on major texts in 20th century Jewish culture as it has played out in the context of immigration and assimilation in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the major center of Jewish culture in Latin America. Through a detailed examination of these works as literary texts that interpret the Jewish experience in Buenos Aires, the seminar will provide participants with an important grounding in this important dimension of ethnic culture in Argentina and, by implication, in other Latin American societies.

  • Brenda Sendejo, assistant professor of anthropology, had an essay titled “Methodologies of the Spirit: Reclaiming Guadalupe and Discovering Tonantzin Within and Beyond the Walls of Academia” published by the University of Arizona Press this month in the anthology, Fleshing the Spirit: Spirituality in Chicana/Latina/Indigeous Women’s Lives.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science & University Scholar, participated in a roundtable at the International Studies Association titled “Resistance as a Strategy for Peace and Justice?” He also co-chaired the annual Editorial Board meeting of the book series he co-edits for Rowman & Littlefield, New Millennium Books in International Relations.

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, has been invited to deliver the first keynote address at an international Shakespeare conference hosted by the Institute of Modern Languages Research at the University of London. The conference, titled “Adapting, Performing & Reviewing Shakespearean Comedy in a European Context,” will draw attendees from across Europe and beyond. His talk will concern the role of language and genre in mediating Shakespeare in the modern world.

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communication studies, was one of the spotlight scholars at Texas State University’s 26th Annual Communication Week March 24-28. Renegar gave a talk on March 24 titled “Rhetoric and Social Criticism: Imagining the Future.”

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, is giving a talk at Ohio State University April 3. The talk, titled “Un/Safe Disclosures,” offers a disability studies reading of safe space, “trigger warnings,” and trauma. While at OSU, she will lead a workshop on incorporating disability and disability studies into course syllabi and developing accessible pedagogy. 

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, chaired two panels and delivered a paper at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Conference in Houston March 27-30. Her talk, “Resuscitating Ruskin: Race Culture as Aesthetic Culture at the fin de siècle,” was drawn from the final chapter of her forthcoming book, The Sanitary Arts: Aesthetic Culture and the Victorian Cleanliness Campaigns. Cleere also served on the Program Committee for the conference.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German, was invited to write the introduction to Gernot Blume’s new volume of poetry, Redewendungen, Gedichte aus den Jahren 2012/13. Blume,a contemporary German poet, ethnomusicologist, composer, singer, musician, multicultural improviser and multi-instrumentalist has gained international recognition for his complex body of work. Germanists are particularly delighted with his Dichterlieder compositions that breathe new life into German classics like Friedrich Hölderlin, Heinrich Heine, Rainer Maria Rilke, Hermann Hesse and Hildegard von Bingen. The volume is scheduled for publication in fall 2014.

March 2014

  • Melissa Johnson, associate professor of anthropology, has had her article titled “Creolized Conservation: A Belizean Creole Community Encounters a Wildlife Sanctuary” accepted for publication in Anthropological Quarterly. It will appear in an issue in late 2014 or early 2015.

  • A paper written by Romi Burks, professor of biology, and seven others who have been involved with the SMArT program was published in Science Education and Civic Engagement: An International Journal. The paper is titled “Staying SMArT: Introduction, Reflection, and Assessment of an Inquiry-based Afterschool Science Program for Elementary School Students.” Other authors of the paper were Anna Frankel, Meredith Liebl, Megan Lowther, Amanda Mohammed, Erica Navaira, Kate Roberts and former staff member Suzy Pukys. The paper is available here.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, presented a paper on March 15 at the American Society of Environmental History conference in San Francisco. The paper is titled “The Garbage Ladies of the Settlements: Environmental Health in Progressive-Era Chicago.” 

  • Eric Selbin, University Scholar and professor of political science, was one of three scholars interviewed by the Iranian journal Andisheh Pouya (Dynamic Thought) for their March year-end review. The article is titled “Protest, it’s my business: To which direction are social movements rising from the new middle class going?” 

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, delivered the inaugural Longmore Lecture at San Francisco State University March 11. Kafer’s talk, “Crip Relations: Critical Disability Studies Now,” marked the opening of the Paul K. Longmore Papers at the SFSU library and was sponsored by the Longmore Institute for Disability Studies. While in the Bay Area, she also gave a reading from her book, Feminist, Queer, Crip at the University of California-Berkeley. On March 13, Kafer delivered the keynote address at the University of Redlands’ undergraduate women’s and gender studies conference. Her talk, “Future Coalitions,” was based on findings from her book.  

  • Alisa Gaunder, professor of political science, participated in a Feb. 25 webinar titled “Connected Classrooms: Bringing Students Together Through Small Group Videoconferencing” that was organized by the Associated Colleges of the South. The webinar and a written summary of it can be found here.

  • Erin Crockett, assistant professor of psychology, co-authored a paper that was published in a recent issue of the journal Infancy. The paper is titled “Maternal Disrupted Communication during Face-to-face Interaction at Four Months: Relation to Maternal and Infant Cortisol Among At-Risk Families.

  • Michael Bray, associate professor of philosophy, had an article titled “El Estado Somos Todos, El Pueblo Soy Yo? − On Chavismo and the Necessity of the Leader,” published in the new issue of Theory & Event.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German, is the recipient of the 2014 Coalition of Women in German (WIG) Faculty Research Award. The award recognizes and supports projects that address a significant topic with demonstrated relevance to German Studies informed by a feminist perspective. Preference is given to projects that engage the intersections of gender with other categories such as sexuality, class, race, ethnicity, religion and citizenship. Berroth is working on a book about the contemporary German author Marica Bodrožić, winner of the European Union Prize for Literature in 2013. Hester Baer, president of WIG, notes the relevance of Berroth’s research project to feminist work in the context of transnational aesthetics, representations of economic transformations in East-Central Europe, and environmental implications in the literature of migration.

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communication studies, co-authored a piece titled “‘When God Give you AIDS…Make Lemon-AIDS’: Ironic Persona and Perspective by Incongruity in Sarah Silverman’s Jesus is Magic’” that was published in the January/February issue of the Western Journal of Communication.

  • Traci Giuliano, professor of psychology, and three of her students are presenting a paper titled “Three’s a Crowd…Or is it? Examining Public Perceptions of Polyamorous Relationships” at the 2014 meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association in Boston March 13-16. The current and former students who worked with Giuliano on the paper are Kevin Hutzler, Jordan Herselman and Sarah M. Johnson.

February 2014

  • Eric Selbin, University Scholar and professor of political science, was on the Steering Committee for the 2014 Lozano Long Conference titled “Archiving the Central American Revolutions” that was held Feb. 19-21 at the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies (LLILAS) at The University of Texas at Austin. The conference brought together scholars, activists, filmmakers, photographers and graduate students interested in Central America’s “revolutionary decades” (1970 through 1990). Selbin also moderated the conference’s closing panel on “Human Rights and Revolution in El Salvador.”

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communication studies, presented a co-authored paper at the Western States Communication Association’s annual convention in Anaheim, Calif., Feb. 14-18. The paper, titled “Transferring Visual Ideographs of Abuse: A Critical Examination of Representations of Domestic Violence,” was named the Top Paper of the conference by the Organization for Research on Women and Communication. Senior communication studies major Danielle Ezzell presented a paper titled “New Masculinity, New Girl” at the Western States Undergraduate Research Conference that was held in conjunction with the convention. The paper was based on research conducted for her Communication Studies capstone project.

  • President Edward Burger is participating in a “polylogue” on digital dementia that will be held at the Texas A&M University Health Science Center College of Medicine in Round Rock on Wednesday, March 5 at 6:30 p.m. Other participants in the event include Dr. Manfred Spitzer, who is giving a March 6 talk at Southwestern on the same topic. Read more here.

  • Kerry Bechtel, professor of theatre, designed the costumes for Unity Theatre’s production of “Almost Maine,” which runs through March 2.

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, has been contracted to be the educational curriculum writer for the forthcoming PBS documentary “LaDonna Harris: Indian 101,” which will directed by Julianna Brannum. The documentary will focus on the life and work of Comanche elder and activist LaDonna Harris.

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, Skyped with graduate students in Rosemarie Garland-Thomson’s seminar in feminist disability studies at Emory University Feb. 19. Students in the seminar read her book Feminist, Queer, Crip as one of their course texts. 2011 graduates Siobhan Cooke and Jordan Johnson are among the students in the class. On Feb. 26, the LGBTQ/Sexualities Research Cluster at UT-Austin will host a reading and discussion of Kafer’s book with her. 

  • Alisa Gaunder, professor of political science, had a comparative book review of The Evolution of Japan’s Party System: Politics and Policy in an Era of Institutional Change edited by Leonard J. Schoppa (Toronto University Press, 2011) and Welfare Through Work: Conservative Ideas, Partisan Dynamics, and Social Protection in Japan by Mari Miura  (Cornell University Press, 2012) published in the December 2013 issue of Perspectives on Politics. Gaunder and Sarah Wiliarty, associated professor of government at Wesleyan University, are putting on a Feb. 25 webinar to discuss their successful collaboration on a course called “Germany and Japan: Losers of World War II?” The webinar is sponsored by the Associated Colleges of the South as part of its ongoing initiative to help faculty members develop “blended learning” courses that combine the best of classroom and online experiences. The course included a co-authored syllabus and lectures, paired with a series of class discussions and activities supported via Google Hangouts.

  • Lois Ferrari, professor of music, conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra in a sold-out performance of “The Planets” in the Alma Thomas Theater Feb. 1. Mark Bottorf, associate professor of physics, gave a pre-concert lecture on the planets in our solar system. Dana Zenobi, part-time assistant professor of applied music, and Nicholas Simpson, part-time instructor of applied music, sang operatic arias with the orchestra. Ferrari also supports an ongoing collaboration with music majors Mattie Kotzur and Lai Na Wang, who are both members of the ACO.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German, presented a poster titled “Global Players: Leadership – Football – Intercultural Perspectives” at the 15th Annual Texas Foreign Language Education Conference held Feb. 14-15 at The University of Texas at Austin. The poster outlined the process and components of an upcoming summer experience in Germany that integrates athletic competition with intercultural learning. The conference topic, “Shaping the Future of Foreign/Second Language Education to Cross Cultural Boundaries: Integrating Theory and Practice,” provided opportunities for engaging discussions of the innovative collaboration between the football and German programs at Southwestern. At the conference, Berroth also contributed to discussions on addressing foreign language anxiety, best practices on using technologies in second language culture learning, and  teaching writing for international students.

  • Willis Weigand, associate professor and director of general chemistry labs, was profiled by the American Chemical Society as part of its series on “Chemists in the Real World.” Read the profile here.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, moderated a panel on “Pedagogy of Revolution” that was part of a conference on “Illustrating Anarchy and Revolution: Mexican Legacies of Global Change” sponsored by the Center for Mexican American Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Students Carly Dennis, Annie Emswiler and Kevin Lentz attended parts of the conference.

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, gave a talk at UC San Diego Feb 5 titled “Un/Safe Disclosures: On Trauma, Tragedy, and Other Taboos.” The talk was sponsored by the English and Communication Studies departments as well as the LGBT Center. While at UCSD, she also met with Michael Davidson’s graduate seminar in cultural studies, which was reading her book Feminist, Queer, Crip (Indiana University Press, 2013) as one of their course texts. 

  • Traci Giuliano, professor of psychology, recently presented a poster titled “Strategies for writing effectively in a first-year seminar” at the National Institute for the Teaching of Psychology in Tampa, Fla.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, gave a talk at Austin Community College’s Eastview Campus Feb. 5 titled “Spaces and Places of (Im)Possibility and Desire: Transversal Revolutionary Imaginaries” as part of the school’s series on revolution.

  • Barbara Owens, professor emeritus of computer science, has been invited to speak at the ACM Women’s Day program that is being held as part of the ACM India conference Feb. 13-15. The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) is the world’s largest educational and scientific computing society for the computer science/IT community. ACM India was started in 2010 to increase the focus on the country. 

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, has an article in the edited volume A Political Companion to Herman Melville, which was recently published by the University Press of Kentucky. Her essay is titled “Melville and the Cadaverous Triumphs of Transcendentalism” and examines how Thoreau and Emerson influenced Melville’s writings, including his enigmatic short story “Bartleby, the Scrivener.”

January 2014

  • Michael Cooper, professor of music and holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts, published the first source-critical edition of Mendelssohn’s setting of Psalm 42 (Kassel: Bärenreiter, 2014). The Psalm is one of Mendelssohn’s most popular choral works, but Cooper’s is the first edition to attribute the English translation (which was prepared by the composer and a close friend) and to draw on the latest editorial techniques and findings of performance-practice research. The edition includes both the full choral/orchestral score and Mendelssohn’s own version for chorus with piano accompaniment. 

  • Melissa Byrnes, assistant professor of history, published an article titled “Liberating the Land or Absorbing a Community: Managing North African Migration and the Bidonvilles in Paris’s Banlieues” in the Winter 2013 special issue of French Politics, Culture & Society, “Algerian Legacies in Metropolitan France.”

  • Bob Bednar, associate professor of communication studies, presented a public lecture titled “Remembering Strangers: Roadside Shrines and Public Memory” on Jan.  29 as part of the Community Lifestyles Lecture Series at Querencia Barton Creek in Austin.

  • Edward Kain, professor of sociology and University Scholar, is leading a Jan. 24 webinar for the American Sociological Association on “MCAT Changes as Department Opportunity.” Representatives from more than 50 sociology departments from across the country are expected to participate in the webinar.

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, is giving at talk at the University of California at Berkeley Jan. 30 on “Tremors and Remedies: Images, Intercessions and Ritual Efficacy in Colonial Cuzco.” Read more here.

  • Fay Guarraci, professor of psychology, has had an article titled ““Sexy stimulants”: The interaction between psychomotor stimulants and sexual behavior in the female brain” accepted for publication in Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior. The article was co-authored by 2010 graduate Jessica Bolton, who is now pursuing graduate studies in neuroscience at Duke University.

  • Reggie Byron, assistant professor of sociology, is the lead author on a co-authored article that was recently accepted for publication at Gender & Society, the leading scholarly journal in women’s studies. The article is titled “Relational Power, Legitimation, and Pregnancy Discrimination” and should appear in a 2014 volume of the journal.

  • Bob Bednar, associate professor of communication studies, had an article titled “Killing Memory: Roadside Memorial Removals and the Necropolitics of Affect” published in the winter 2013 issue of the journal Cultural Politics. The article is available here.

  • Barbara Anthony, assistant professor of computer science, had a paper on “Online bottleneck matching” published in the January 2014 issue of the Journal of Combinatorial Optimization. The paper was co-authored with Christine Chung from Connecticut College. 

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, assisted in the translation of program notes from Russian to English to accompany Igor Kazakov’s ongoing production of “Hamlet” at the Mogilev Regional Puppet Theater in Belarus. The production has been a popular success, and won praise from critics

  • Reggie Byron, assistant professor of sociology, had a teaching exercise he developed titled “Teaching Tokenism with Occupational Sex Segregation Data” published in the American Sociological Association’s Teaching Resources and Innovations Library for Sociology. The exercise can be found here. Byron also has been appointed to a three-year term on the American Sociological Association’s Honors Program Advisory Panel. Serving on this panel will allow Byron to mentor some of the most exceptional undergraduate sociology majors from across the country.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, chaired a panel on “Catholics, Racial Justice, and Reassessing Religion in the Long Civil Rights Movement,” at the American Historical Association conference in Washington, D.C., in early January.

  • In December, Tuba-Euphonium Press published an arrangement of “Salve Maria” created by Delaine Leonard, part-time instructor of applied music, and Eileen Meyer Russell, associate professor of music. The arrangement of Saverio Mercadante’s composition is set for harp and low brass (trombone or euphonium).  Fedson and Meyer Russell first performed the arrangement in recital at Southwestern, and the arrangement is recorded on their 2011 CD, Unique Conversations.

  • Lois Ferrari, professor of music, conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra in a Nov. 9 concert that featured a work by American composer Anthony Iannaccone called “Dancing on Vesuvius.” Iannaccone attended the concert and gave a pre-concert talk with Ferrari. Southwestern students Mattie Kotzur and Lena Wong are current members of the orchestra, along with Southwestern graduates Bob Brockett, Laura Gorman and Jennifer Coyle.

  • Abby Dings, associate professor of Spanish, presented two talks at the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages conference that was held in Orlando, Fla., in November. In “Learning about Spanish Oral Proficiency Evaluation: An Online Resource,” a joint presentation with colleagues from The University of Texas, the University of Iowa and Purdue University, she presented a project piloting a series of Open Badges for the Spanish Corpus Proficiency Level Training website. Her talk on “The Undergraduate Spanish Major Curriculum: Faculty, Alumni, and Student Perspectives,” which was co-presented with Tammy Jandrey Hertel of Lynchburg College, focused on the results of a nationwide survey of Spanish faculty members, current students and alumni.

  • Sergio Costola, associate professor of theatre, and Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, co-authored an essay titled “Shylock’s Venice and the Grammar of the Modern City,” that was accepted in a forthcoming collection of essays, Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance: Appropriation, Transformation, Opposition, edited by Michele Marrapodi, to be published by Ashgate in late 2014 or early 2015. Their essay suggests that Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice shows how Jews and other foreigners − such as John Florio, a contemporary of Shakespeare − were alienated in London, as well as in Venice.    

  • Barbara Anthony, assistant professor of computer science, presented a paper at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Global Communications Conference in Atlanta, Ga., Dec. 12. The paper, titled “Data Plan Throttling: A Simple Consumer Choice Mechanism,” was co-authored with Christine Chung, assistant professor of computer science at Connecticut College, and published in the conference proceedings and IEEE Xplore.

December 2013

  • Thomas McClendon, professor of history, attended the annual meeting of the African Studies Association Nov. 21-24 in Baltimore. He presented a paper, co-authored with Professor Pamela Scully of Emory University,  on “South African Students and the U.S. Anti-Apartheid Movement in the 1980s: Activism and Opportunity,” as part of a panel on “Apartheid Migration and Anti-Apartheid Activism in Southern Africa.” He also served as discussant for a panel on “Scholars, Photographers and Chiefs: The Uses and Constructions of Zuluness.”

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communication studies, presented a co-authored paper at the National Communication Association annual conference in Washington, D.C., in November. The paper, which was titled “Unmasking the Football Fraternity: A Burkean Analysis of the Penn State Sex Crimes,” was named one of the Top Four papers by the Kenneth Burke Society division of the conference.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, gave a talk at Bielefeld University in Germany titled “Spaces and Places of (Im)Possibility and Desire: Transversal Revolutionary Imaginaries in the 20th Century Americas” and led a faculty/graduate student workshop on his work, “Local Stories−Global Impact? The Role of Stories and Imaginaries in Revolutions since the 19th Century.”

November 2013

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, recently received a $25,927 grant from the Williamson County Conservation Foundation for research on the ecology of the Georgetown salamander. Over the past four years, Pierce has received a total of $104,069 for his research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Anwar Sounny-Slitine, instructor of environmental studies and GIS lab manager, co-authored an article titled “A new longitudinal approach to assess hydrologic connectivity: Embanked floodplain inundation along the lower Mississippi River” that was published in a recent issue of the journal Hydrological Processes. The article looked at hydrologic connectivity in the lower Mississippi floodplain. Sounny-Slitine and his colleagues utilized GIS and LiDAR to create hydrological models which estimated the longitudinal channel bank profile, enabling a detailed examination of embanked floodplain hydrologic connectivity. The results of the investigation shed new light on the topic of hydrologic connectivity for an important embanked fluvial system that has previously received little attention concerning its physical floodplain processes. Read more here.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, reviewed Hal Brands’ book, Latin America’s Cold War, for the Bulletin of Latin American Research. Read the review here.

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, gave a lecture on “Moteuczoma’s Fame in Three Dimensions: Sign, Speech and Portrait in Tenochtitlan” at UT-Austin Nov. 13. Hajovsky is giving the same lecture at Southwestern Nov. 18 at noon in the Merzbach Room. Read more here. Hajovsky is the author of an upcoming book tentatively titled Moteuczoma, On the Lips of Others: Sculpture, Ritual and Fame in Tenochtitlan that will be published by UT Press.

  • Romi Burks, professor of biology, and Therese Shelton, associate professor of mathematics, had an article titled “Count Your Eggs Before They Invade: Identifying and Quantifying Egg Clutches of Two Invasive Apple Snail Species (Pomacea)” published in the online journal PLOS ONE. Former students Allyson Plantz and Colin Kylewere co-authors on the paper. Read the article here.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, participated as an invited reviewer at the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Collections and References Resources Grant Program in Washington, D.C.

  • Feminist, Queer, Crip, the new book by Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, will be highlighted during this weekend’s National Women’s Studies Association conference in Cincinnati. Kafer’s work will be the focus of an “Authors Meet Critics” session, which is designed to bring authors of recent cutting-edge books deemed to be important contributions to the field of women’s studies together with discussants chosen to provide a variety of viewpoints. Read more here. Earlier this week, Kafer spoke about the book with Professor Matt Richardson’s graduate seminar on queer theory at UT-Austin. 

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, presented a paper titled “Moteuczoma-Tezcatlipoca-Xiuhtecuhtli: Invisibility and Visibility in Aztec Sculpture and Ritual,” at the 4th Annual South Central Conference on Mesoamerica, which was held at the University of Houston Nov. 1-3.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German, participated in the 38th annual conference of the Coalition of Women in German (WIG) in Shawnee on Delaware, Pa., Oct. 24-27. Berroth led three professional development workshops, organized and moderated a panel on “Erlkönigs Töchter: Witches and Ghosts in German Literature and Film,” and collaborated in selecting the 2013 winner of the Women in German Dissertation Prize. She was appointed to chair the Dissertation Prize Committee in the coming year. The WIG membership also voted to sponsor Berroth’s proposal to organize and moderate a panel on “Eco-Pedagogy and Feminist Praxis in Modern Languages and Literatures” at the 2014 conference of the American Council for Teaching Foreign Languages  (ACTFL) and the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) that will be held in San Antonio next November.

  • Three Music Department faculty members were featured at the College Music Society National Conference held in Cambridge, Mass., Oct. 30-Nov. 2. Jason Hoogerhyde, associate professor of music, had his piano trio, Canopy of Night, performed by the Trio Florida on one of the CMS New Music Concerts. Kiyoshi Tamagawa, professor of music, presented a paper titled “The Sing-It-Yourself Messiah: A Particular Kind of Community Engagement,” and Eileen Meyer Russell, associate professor of music, presented a paper titled “Civic Engagement and the Applied Music Studio.” 

October 2013

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, has been named a Research Fellow at the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies at The University of Texas at Austin.

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communications studies, authored an article titled “Critical/Cultural Scholarship and the Responsibility for Building Theory: Enduring Criticism Revisited” that appeared in a recent special issue of the Western Journal of Communication.

  • Alison Marr, associate professor of mathematics, co-authored an article titled “Minimal Pancyclic Graphs” that appeared in a recent issue of the Journal of Combinatorial Mathematics and Combinatorial Computing.

  • Josh Long, assistant professor of environmental studies, co-authored an article titled “Toward Sustainable Educational Travel” that appeared in a recent issue of the Journal of Sustainable Tourism. He also co-authored an article titled “A Broad Spectrum: Sustainability in Educational Travel” that appeared in a recent issue of theJournal of Sustainability in Higher Education.

  • Michael Kamen, associate professor of education, co-authored a chapter titled “Exploring Innovative Schools with Preservice Teachers,” which appears in The Routledge International Handbook of Innovation Education. Kamen wrote the chapter with Debbie Shepherd from the Meridian School in Round Rock.

  • Michael Cooper, professor of music and holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts, published hisHistorical Dictionary of Romantic Music with The Scarecrow Press.

  • Davi Thornton, associate professor of communication studies, had an essay titled “The Rhetoric of Civil Rights Photographs: James Meredith’s March Against Fear” published in the fall 2013 issue of the journal Rhetoric & Public Affairs.